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By DAN BERGER | March 21, 1991
If we won the war, why aren't we happier?Rebuilding is something the Kuwait government, whatever it was doing in exile from August to March, never thought about.President Walesa will find that Americans can forgive anything but debt.Howzat again? A mayor at war with City Council redistricted for ** minimum inconvenience to any of its members, who substituted a plan of maximum anxiety for most.Football is a dangerous sport. Bo knew that.
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NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2006
A Well-Paid Slave: Curt Flood's Fight For Free Agency in Professional Sports Brad Snyder Viking / 472 pages / $25.95. In 1969, after 12 years as an outstanding outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, Curt Flood learned from a sportswriter that he had been traded to the Philadelphia Phillies. The next day a form preprinted on an index card made it official. "If I had been a foot-shuffling porter," Flood fumed, "they might have at least given me a pocket watch." With roots in St. Louis, including a portrait and photography business, Flood opted to forgo his $90,000 salary and retire.
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NEWS
By Rafael Medoff | September 23, 2005
The passing of Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal is a moment to pay tribute to his relentless pursuit of justice - and to consider that while today it is a given that such criminals should be punished, there was a time when Nazi-hunting was not politically correct. Soon after the United States entered World War II, the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt began formulating its policy on postwar treatment of Nazi war criminals. Even at that early stage, the Allies knew enough about Nazi atrocities against Jews and others to know that if and when they won the war, they would have many war criminals on their hands.
NEWS
By Rafael Medoff | September 23, 2005
The passing of Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal is a moment to pay tribute to his relentless pursuit of justice - and to consider that while today it is a given that such criminals should be punished, there was a time when Nazi-hunting was not politically correct. Soon after the United States entered World War II, the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt began formulating its policy on postwar treatment of Nazi war criminals. Even at that early stage, the Allies knew enough about Nazi atrocities against Jews and others to know that if and when they won the war, they would have many war criminals on their hands.
NEWS
By Peter Tarnoff | February 26, 1991
IT IS difficult to understand why the United States-led coalition needed to launch a large-scale ground campaign again Iraq forces. In fact, President Bush failed to understand that America already had won the war in the Persian Gulf.Saddam Hussein had been forced to give up what he most wanted and vowed never to return -- Kuwait. Virtually all of Iraq's advanced weapons manufacturing capabilities have been destroyed, and damage to the civioolian and military infrastructure has been considerable.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Solarz | January 21, 1992
THE HISTORICAL revisionists are already at work. Last year's triumph in the war against Iraq, they claim, has turned to ashes. We won the war only to lose the peace. But the naysayers who make this argument too cavalierly dismiss the strategic and diplomatic benefits produced by Operation Desert Storm.To be sure, the fact that Saddam Hussein remains in power is deeply disturbing. But this hardly constitutes an argument against the war, particularly since he would still be comfortably ensconced in Iraq and Kuwait if we had not moved against him.Perhaps the war's most significant achievement has been the extent to which we have substantially set back Iraq's efforts to obtain nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 31, 1995
WINSTON Churchill's take on what would have happened had Robert E. Lee won the Battle of Gettysburg occupied this space last Monday. As I reminded readers, he wasn't the only writer to ponder such an "if."Martin H. McKibbin teaches at McDonogh School. A few years ago he proposed to his 11th grade U.S. history students that they research historical events and write essays about "what might have happened."Over the next six years almost 300 students collaborated to produce 51 essays covering events from Plymouth Rock (what if the Mayflower had turned around before reaching America?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 16, 2003
The North may have won the Civil War, but in Hollywood, the South reigns triumphant. That was certainly true in 1915, when D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation portrayed the conflict as a war of Northern aggression where order was restored only by the arrival of the Ku Klux Klan. It was true in 1939, when Gone With the Wind looked back on the antebellum South as an unrivalled period of grace and beauty never to be seen again. It was true when Clint Eastwood played The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 2004
The nation's top military officer came to Baltimore last night to say that the war on terrorism would take patience, commitment and will, and that "steady progress" was being made in rebuilding Afghanistan and Iraq. Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, called the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and the likelihood of additional terrorist incidents "the biggest threat our nation has faced since the Civil War, perhaps ever." And he said "our government is absolutely committed to winning this war."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 6, 1990
ASK PEOPLE what they thought of the Civil War as depicted on the PBS series, and they say, "great!" "terrific!" "wonderful!" They should say "awful!" "horrible!" "sickening!"More Americans died in the Civil War than in World War II, and our population was only a fifth as large. There were about a million casualties in a nation of 31 million.But the war was inevitable, some say. And its goal was so noble! And the long-range outcome was to save the world for democracy! So it was worth the carnage!
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 24, 2004
The nation's top military officer came to Baltimore last night to say that the war on terrorism would take patience, commitment and will, and that "steady progress" was being made in rebuilding Afghanistan and Iraq. Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, called the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and the likelihood of additional terrorist incidents "the biggest threat our nation has faced since the Civil War, perhaps ever." And he said "our government is absolutely committed to winning this war."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2004
The most influential thinker in 20th-century American foreign policy completed his own century this week. As George Frost Kennan quietly celebrated his 100th birthday Monday at home in Princeton, N.J., scholars were still debating whether his doctrine of containment, which guided eight U.S. presidents through a treacherous Cold War, applies to new threats and a new global ideology as implacably hostile to the United States as Soviet communism. "Kennan is a remarkable figure - there's no one of comparable influence," says Steven David, a political scientist at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | September 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - John Kerry, the junior senator from Massachusetts who would be president, wants us to know that he's a war hero and George W. Bush isn't. This week, Mr. Kerry formally announced his bid for the Democratic nomination using the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown as his backdrop. Mr. Kerry surrounded himself with some of the men he served with in Vietnam, where he earned a Silver Star, Bronze Star and three Purple Hearts. He then used the occasion to launch an all-out assault on the integrity of the present commander in chief.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 16, 2003
The North may have won the Civil War, but in Hollywood, the South reigns triumphant. That was certainly true in 1915, when D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation portrayed the conflict as a war of Northern aggression where order was restored only by the arrival of the Ku Klux Klan. It was true in 1939, when Gone With the Wind looked back on the antebellum South as an unrivalled period of grace and beauty never to be seen again. It was true when Clint Eastwood played The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)
NEWS
By Jeff Nesmith and Bartosz Weglarczyk and Jeff Nesmith and Bartosz Weglarczyk,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 6, 2000
WASHINGTON - London newspapers are up in arms over the movie "U-571" because it changes history and has U.S. commandos capturing a German submarine and a priceless encoding machine, when in fact the feat was performed by British sailors. Ignored in the trans-Atlantic tempest is the fact that it was neither Britons nor Americans who swiped Hitler's famous "Enigma" encoding machine, but Poles. More than a half-century after the end of World War II, the crucial involvement of Polish intelligence in breaking the Enigma code is still largely unknown to the public.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber, and Bill Glauber,,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 2000
BELA CRVKA, Yugoslavia -- The father cannot forget the photographs rescued from a shallow grave. In his leathery hands, he carefully holds a precious album of pictures retrieved from an undeveloped roll of film discovered in his youngest son's clothing. He sees his two teen-age boys, alive and well, in the days before war came to this isolated Kosovo village and Serbian gunners killed 64 people. "I think, every day, it gets harder for me," says the father who buried two sons twice, on a moonlit spring night and a sweltering summer day -- first, right after a massacre, and the second time after the bodies were exhumed for war crimes investigators.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | September 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - John Kerry, the junior senator from Massachusetts who would be president, wants us to know that he's a war hero and George W. Bush isn't. This week, Mr. Kerry formally announced his bid for the Democratic nomination using the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown as his backdrop. Mr. Kerry surrounded himself with some of the men he served with in Vietnam, where he earned a Silver Star, Bronze Star and three Purple Hearts. He then used the occasion to launch an all-out assault on the integrity of the present commander in chief.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Ambrose | July 3, 1998
THEY were an extraordinary generation of Americans, the men and women of World War II. They won the war, planned for postwar peace and led the country through the second half of this century. They were children of the Depression, tempered by hardship but imbued with ideals of service and sacrifice. Some had fathers who had gone to France with Gen. John J. Pershing's American Expeditionary Force, to fight a war some said was to make the world safe for democracy. But with the onset of a second, more horrible world war, their generation was forced to fight to uphold American ideals.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 8, 1999
PARIS -- The war for Kosovo was first described as a triumph of air power, a revolution in warfare and the first humanitarian war. President Clinton, during his trip to the Balkans, seemed to promise more such wars -- proposing what amounts to a Clinton Doctrine of intervention on behalf of the persecuted peoples of the world.More sober voices will be heard before that comes about. The argument can be made that this war was the last, as well as the first, of its kind, at least so far as NATO is concerned.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Ambrose | July 3, 1998
THEY were an extraordinary generation of Americans, the men and women of World War II. They won the war, planned for postwar peace and led the country through the second half of this century. They were children of the Depression, tempered by hardship but imbued with ideals of service and sacrifice. Some had fathers who had gone to France with Gen. John J. Pershing's American Expeditionary Force, to fight a war some said was to make the world safe for democracy. But with the onset of a second, more horrible world war, their generation was forced to fight to uphold American ideals.
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