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By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 16, 2009
Forecasters say there's a good chance thunderstorms will water the Preakness this evening. But the rain could hardly compare with the weather in Baltimore the last time a filly won the race. Nellie Morse ran and won in 1924 in what The Sun described as "six inches of waffle batter. It was as much a regatta as a horse-race." Her owner predicted she would win "in a walk, or shall we say, a breast-stroke."
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 16, 2009
Forecasters say there's a good chance thunderstorms will water the Preakness this evening. But the rain could hardly compare with the weather in Baltimore the last time a filly won the race. Nellie Morse ran and won in 1924 in what The Sun described as "six inches of waffle batter. It was as much a regatta as a horse-race." Her owner predicted she would win "in a walk, or shall we say, a breast-stroke."
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SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1992
Bryan Townsend of Atholton said he didn't expect much out of yesterday's Class 3A cross country championship meet at Western Maryland College.Said Townsend: "I thought I had a chance [to win], but I didn't think it was a very good one."The senior started the race as just another hopeful. Sixteen minutes, 7 seconds later, he was a state champion.Townsend sprinted across the finish line five seconds ahead of second-place Tim Billo of Walt Whitman. Though Whitman captured the team title, it did little to dampen Townsend's moment.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
Hours before the first of the multimillion-dollar yachts in the Volvo Ocean Race crossed the finish line in Goteborg, Sweden, yesterday, seven months and five days after they started, race organizers removed any doubt about the competition's future. Not only will there be another global circumnavigation, but it will also return in three years, a break in the traditional four-year cycle, and include new ports of call. "This is an exciting time in the long and proud history of the Volvo Ocean Race," said Glenn Bourke, chief executive of the race, as he unveiled the outline for a bigger, bolder competition.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski | October 27, 1994
This time, Gilman's Ted Lord would not be denied.After being nipped by Calvert Hall's Jonathan Dietrich in last year's Maryland Scholastic Association Individual Championships, Lord got some revenge yesterday by taking 32 seconds off the Cardinals' 3.1-mile course in a record time of 15 minutes, 43 seconds."
NEWS
By Staff report | April 5, 1992
Staff report Several Carroll County racers roared to success last Sunday at the 75-80 Dragway:* Joe Mayne of Mount Airy was the runner-up to Dan Householder of Marriottsville in Class I competition.Mayne, in his Dragster, lost to Householder in his Duster. Also in that class, Ray Lewis of Woodbine went three rounds of competition.Westminster's Mike Hoff used his Mustang to roll to the final of Class II action and split first-place money with Chris Hruska of Mount Airy. Hruska also used a Mustang.
SPORTS
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | June 24, 1991
Almost everyone agreed that the best man didn't win the Bud Light Triathlon yesterday.Brett Rose, who won last week's tour race in San Jose, was a full 90 seconds in front of the pack and just four miles from the end of the middle bike portion of the race. That lead, coupled with Rose's strong history in the 10K finale, should have been enough to give him an easy win and the $1,000 first prize.L But it was that long lead that inevitably cost him the race.So far in front that he raced for miles without a motorcycle police escort, Rose was hit just after one arrived and made a U-turn after leading him the wrong way on the course near Maryland Avenue.
SPORTS
By DAVE HYDE and DAVE HYDE,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 20, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- Her legs began to tighten on the second lap. That's really when it ended. That's when Jennifer Rodriguez knew it wouldn't be her day and probably her Olympics. That's how it goes in the sport of speed skating. All those years, all that sacrifice, all the hours spent training on the ice, and it came to something as simple as her legs sending the wrong signal early yesterday evening. Rodriguez had skated a slow first lap in the 1,000-meter race, the clock on the ice underlining what her mind was telling her. But she figured another gear was there to be found on the second lap. Instead, her legs were tightening.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | May 17, 1992
When you have only a couple of minutes of actual horse race, but 90 minutes of broadcast time to fill, you have to make some choices and do some inventing.ABC's solution yesterday in its telecast of the Preakness was to craft story lines loaded with much exaggeration and overcommit to them.The network used almost none of its air time, though, to try to give viewers a sense of the pageantry, the crowd or what it felt like to be at Pimlico Race Course. The lack of racetrack atmosphere was a disappointment.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Run Alden took a step toward a possible start in the May 21 Preakness yesterday when he demonstrated his quality against Maryland-breds and won the Goss L. Stryker Stakes at Laurel Race Course by seven lengths over Invincible Sue."The race was self-explanatory," said jockey Allen Stacy. "Jerry [Robb, the trainer] told me he'd win, and he did." Said Robb: "I think Allen was impressed. He looked bug-eyed afterwards."The horse immediately took the lead, relaxed, opened up when horses came to him on the turn and drew off in the stretch of the seven-furlong race.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY AND SAM SESSA and ANNIE LINSKEY AND SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTERS | April 30, 2006
Standing aboard the Volvo Ocean Race yacht movistar yesterday morning, crew member Jonathan Swain looked up at the clear skies, considered the prediction for light winds and said, "It is going to be a beautiful day -- just not for sailing." He was right. Sort of. The perfect spring day drew an estimated 1,000 spectator boats to the Chesapeake Bay. Those aboard eagerly watched the seven Volvo Ocean boats compete in a round-the-buoys race. The wind conditions -- shifty and 10 knots -- were not ideal for the 70-foot yachts, which are designed for windier conditions.
SPORTS
By DAVE HYDE and DAVE HYDE,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 20, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- Her legs began to tighten on the second lap. That's really when it ended. That's when Jennifer Rodriguez knew it wouldn't be her day and probably her Olympics. That's how it goes in the sport of speed skating. All those years, all that sacrifice, all the hours spent training on the ice, and it came to something as simple as her legs sending the wrong signal early yesterday evening. Rodriguez had skated a slow first lap in the 1,000-meter race, the clock on the ice underlining what her mind was telling her. But she figured another gear was there to be found on the second lap. Instead, her legs were tightening.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | October 27, 2002
When Winston Cup driver Bill Elliott arrived at Atlanta Motor Speedway for today's NAPA 500, his head was full of memories. It was 10 years ago that he won this race. Ten years ago that the late Alan Kulwicki won the Winston Cup championship. Ten years ago that Jeff Gordon made his series debut. And, 10 years ago that Richard Petty drove his last race. "It was a big day," Elliott said. "Going into that race, Davey Allison was in the [Winston Cup] points lead, and it was his to lose. I was within striking distance, and I did all I could do. I won the race.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
The joy was there to be heard in Michael Andretti's voice. The veteran CART driver is coming back to the Indianapolis 500 for the first time since Championship Auto Racing Teams and the Indy Racing League went their separate ways in 1995. "I'm tickled to death to be back at Indy," Andretti said. Say what you will about the Indianapolis 500 and its perceived loss of prestige since the split - it is still a Siren. All by itself, the race is putting an end to the boycott that has kept CART teams and drivers away from Indianapolis.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 26, 1999
Hannah, a "retired" greyhound who helped save Baltimore's Greyhound bus terminal on Howard Street, died suddenly on Tuesday. She was 13 1/2.After a year of racing under the name "Stakerunner," Hannah began a second career as a preservation advocate in 1987, when she was adopted by two local preservationists who were waging a campaign to save the 1941 bus terminal from the wrecking ball.Her owners, Fred Shoken and Donna Beth Joy Shapiro, began bringing her to the building with them to call attention to the need for preserving it.City officials eventually found a developer to convert the building to offices for the Metropolitan Planning Council and other agencies, retaining its distinctive Art Moderne lines.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 30, 1997
COMPUTER GAMES are quickly replacing bikes and baby dolls under the Christmas tree, and grown-ups are resolving to finally hook up to the Internet in the New Year. The personal computer has supplanted the VCR and the microwave oven as the big-ticket electronic toy no family can do without.And it scares us, I think.Far more than the toy guns we feared to give because they might make our sons violent, or the Barbie dolls that might make are daughters anorexic, parents fear the fundamental changes computers, and the gateway they provide to the Internet, might cause in our children.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 25, 1992
LAUREL -- Risen Colony just about wore herself out chasing fillies like Lite Light and Meadow Star early last year.But since the 4-year-old daughter of 1981 Preakness winner Pleasant Colony joined trainer Ross Pearce at Delaware Park in August and started racing against lesser company, she's been beaten only once in five starts.She makes her Maryland debut today in the first running of the Maryland Racing Writers' Handicap, and is expected to be a short-priced favorite.Risen Colony has won four straight races, two of them in stakes, been ridden by a wide assortment of jockeys and seems to run well over any kind of track.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
Mark Johnston, who is experiencing his best season as a jockey since leading the nation's apprentices in 1990, won his seventh Maryland stakes race of the year yesterday when he guided Pescagani to a front-running victory in the $75,000 Riggs Handicap at Pimlico Race Course.New York invader Jodi's The Best got the first call out of the gate in the bulky 14-horse field at 12 furlongs on the turf, but soon relinquished the lead to Pescagani.After being pressed by Master Dreamer during the first half mile, Pescagani settled in stride and then demoralized the opposition when Johnston opened up a widening lead with him going into the final turn.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1997
Michael Harrigan's smile grows a little wider every time he watches his 9-year-old son, Ryan, race in a soap box derby.It's not necessarily the winning that pleases the elder Harrigan -- although the Columbia resident is the first to admit that seeing Ryan collect eight trophies in just 11 races is "great."Rather, Michael Harrigan gets a such kick out of watching his son compete because the father was once a race car driver himself."I'm excited for him," concedes Michael Harrigan, a 43-year-old branch chief and photographer for U.S. Department of Defense who raced with the Sports Car Club of America about 20 years ago. "You feel a bit of nostalgia."
SPORTS
By Stanley Dillon VTC and Stanley Dillon VTC,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1996
Racing for the track championship in any motorsport takes a lot of dedication. It requires the driver and his crew to be at the track every weekend.With a couple track titles, Ed Talbert knows what it takes to win.Talbert was a regular competitor until last year when the demands of his job as a Kubota tractor mechanic at Norbert Richardson & Sons in Woodbine limited his time for racing. Still, he made it to the track more than 20 times and finished in the money in several races.Talbert likes to race.
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