Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWomen Writers
IN THE NEWS

Women Writers

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Laurie Kaplan and Laurie Kaplan,Special to The Sun | August 8, 1994
For an editor, compiling a list of the world's "greatest" or "most important" women writers and then settling on the top 135 must be a no-win intellectual/political exercise similar to being a celebrity guest on NPR's "Desert Island Discs" program: Everyone will sneer at your taste whatever you do. The trick is to pick your favorites and leave it at that -- no apologies.Assembling a representative group of great women writers may be a more daunting (and politically incorrect) task than lining up 10 favorite pieces of music.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
In a faraway corner of the Internet, in a room cluttered with mountains and dogs and children and lovers and souffles and beloved grandparents, the women of the Memoir Cafe share pieces of their existence. A few aspire to be published, but most Cafe members simply want to fine tune their ability to make written sense of their lives and to add their thoughts to the collective experience of women around the world. They work in a cyber community brought together by Stephanie Montgomery, a Walpole, N.H., writer and teacher who launched the Memoir Cafe last February.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Contributing Writer | January 18, 1993
"Poetry is a matter of life, not just a matter of language," Lucille Clifton, past poet laureate of Maryland, explains. The writer is drawn by the world, by life, by mystery. "You have to be open to mystery," she says. "And life keeps happening."Ms. Clifton, who teaches at St. Mary's College and is the winner of numerous awards, including an Emmy from the American Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, calls writing a visceral thing. The writer must get a feel for "how the lines wish to proceed, how the words wish to follow each other, how the sounds work together in a kind of music."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
More than 25 years ago, a group of women sat around a kitchen table in Columbia trying to figure out how they could meet writers they admired. None of them envisioned the day when Nobel laureates and Pulitzer Prize winners would come to their programs and a National Book Award winner would sit on their board. Since 1974, the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society has emerged as a powerhouse in regional literary circles. Better known as HoCoPoLitSo, the organization has brought dozens of high-profile authors and poets to the area while working to further the joys of literature.
NEWS
By Francine Prose | August 1, 1994
OUT Of THE GARDEN: WOMEN WRITERS ON THE BIBLE. Edited by Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. Fawcett/Columbine. 351 pp. $23.READING "Out of the Garden," a remarkable anthology of essays on the Bible by 28 women writers, I was reminded of how, years ago, I and the other little girls in my Hebrew-school class dressed up as Queen Esther for the annual Purim carnivals.Inevitably, a funereal mood stole over us as we regarded one another -- ungainly, anxious children at the most awkward of ages -- and realized that all our mothers' makeup and prettiest paisley scarves had sadly failed to transform us into the Jewish beauty who won the Persian king's heart.
NEWS
By Terence Samuel and Terence Samuel,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 5, 1992
BEARING WITNESS:SELECTIONS FROMAFRICAN-AMERICANBIOGRAPHY IN THETWENTIETH CENTURY.Edited by Henry Louis Gates.Pantheon.385 pages. $16. There is a debate in this land about political correctness, sacred tradition and how both should influence the assessment of great literature. Out of this heated, if often empty, screaming match have emerged people on both sides who assume the wisdom to tell us what is important reading and what is not.These are dangerous times for an American mind.If you haven't been paying attention, the extremist factions seem to line up mostly for or against dead, white, male writers.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
More than 25 years ago, a group of women sat around a kitchen table in Columbia trying to figure out how they could meet writers they admired. None of them envisioned the day when Nobel laureates and Pulitzer Prize winners would come to their programs and a National Book Award winner would sit on their board. Since 1974, the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society has emerged as a powerhouse in regional literary circles. Better known as HoCoPoLitSo, the organization has brought dozens of high-profile authors and poets to the area while working to further the joys of literature.
SPORTS
By Kristin Huckshorn and Kristin Huckshorn,Knight-Ridder | October 4, 1990
WHY DOESN'T Lisa Olson shut up?I admit it. That is what I have been thinking ever since Olson, a Boston sportswriter, began publicly explaining how she was sexually harassed by five New England Patriots in their locker room last month.That is what I thought again Tuesday, when I heard that another sportswriter, Denise Tom of USA Today, had been denied access to the Cincinnati Bengals' locker room after their loss Monday night to the Seahawks.Denise and I became sportswriters more than a decade ago (I switched to news three years ago.)
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
In a faraway corner of the Internet, in a room cluttered with mountains and dogs and children and lovers and souffles and beloved grandparents, the women of the Memoir Cafe share pieces of their existence. A few aspire to be published, but most Cafe members simply want to fine tune their ability to make written sense of their lives and to add their thoughts to the collective experience of women around the world. They work in a cyber community brought together by Stephanie Montgomery, a Walpole, N.H., writer and teacher who launched the Memoir Cafe last February.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
Today Aaron Lansky -- Founder of the National Yiddish Book Center will speak on his book Outwitting History: The Amazing Adventures of a Man Who Rescued a Million Yiddish Books. 7 p.m. / Weinberg Park Heights JCC / 5700 Park Heights Ave. / $5 / 410-735-5010. Wednesday, March 26 Linda Pasta -- This past Maryland poet laureate will read from her work, share selections from her favorite poets and discuss the significance of poetry in our everyday lives. / 11 a.m. / Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped / 415 Park Ave. / 410-230-2424.
FEATURES
By Laurie Kaplan and Laurie Kaplan,Special to The Sun | August 8, 1994
For an editor, compiling a list of the world's "greatest" or "most important" women writers and then settling on the top 135 must be a no-win intellectual/political exercise similar to being a celebrity guest on NPR's "Desert Island Discs" program: Everyone will sneer at your taste whatever you do. The trick is to pick your favorites and leave it at that -- no apologies.Assembling a representative group of great women writers may be a more daunting (and politically incorrect) task than lining up 10 favorite pieces of music.
NEWS
By Francine Prose | August 1, 1994
OUT Of THE GARDEN: WOMEN WRITERS ON THE BIBLE. Edited by Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. Fawcett/Columbine. 351 pp. $23.READING "Out of the Garden," a remarkable anthology of essays on the Bible by 28 women writers, I was reminded of how, years ago, I and the other little girls in my Hebrew-school class dressed up as Queen Esther for the annual Purim carnivals.Inevitably, a funereal mood stole over us as we regarded one another -- ungainly, anxious children at the most awkward of ages -- and realized that all our mothers' makeup and prettiest paisley scarves had sadly failed to transform us into the Jewish beauty who won the Persian king's heart.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Contributing Writer | January 18, 1993
"Poetry is a matter of life, not just a matter of language," Lucille Clifton, past poet laureate of Maryland, explains. The writer is drawn by the world, by life, by mystery. "You have to be open to mystery," she says. "And life keeps happening."Ms. Clifton, who teaches at St. Mary's College and is the winner of numerous awards, including an Emmy from the American Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, calls writing a visceral thing. The writer must get a feel for "how the lines wish to proceed, how the words wish to follow each other, how the sounds work together in a kind of music."
NEWS
By Terence Samuel and Terence Samuel,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 5, 1992
BEARING WITNESS:SELECTIONS FROMAFRICAN-AMERICANBIOGRAPHY IN THETWENTIETH CENTURY.Edited by Henry Louis Gates.Pantheon.385 pages. $16. There is a debate in this land about political correctness, sacred tradition and how both should influence the assessment of great literature. Out of this heated, if often empty, screaming match have emerged people on both sides who assume the wisdom to tell us what is important reading and what is not.These are dangerous times for an American mind.If you haven't been paying attention, the extremist factions seem to line up mostly for or against dead, white, male writers.
SPORTS
By Kristin Huckshorn and Kristin Huckshorn,Knight-Ridder | October 4, 1990
WHY DOESN'T Lisa Olson shut up?I admit it. That is what I have been thinking ever since Olson, a Boston sportswriter, began publicly explaining how she was sexually harassed by five New England Patriots in their locker room last month.That is what I thought again Tuesday, when I heard that another sportswriter, Denise Tom of USA Today, had been denied access to the Cincinnati Bengals' locker room after their loss Monday night to the Seahawks.Denise and I became sportswriters more than a decade ago (I switched to news three years ago.)
NEWS
March 28, 2003
A Georgetown University symposium tomorrow will present four Catholic women writers who will discuss the impact of their religion and heritage on their work. The symposium, "Catholicism, Ethnicity and American Fiction," will feature talks by Louisa Ermelino, the author of three novels celebrating New York City and her Italian heritage; Maria Amparo Escandon, born and raised in Mexico City and author of Esperanza's Book of Saints; Maureen Howard, author of nine novels and winner of the National Book Critics Award for her autobiography; and Suzanne Strempek Shea, who has written about life in New England in four novels set around her home region of Western Massachusetts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 4, 2001
`Venus' unveiled Suzan-Lori Parks' "Venus," based on the story of a 19th-century African woman known as the Venus Hottentot, begins performances at AXIS Theatre on Wednesday. The 1996 play, which highlights the woman's life as a London sideshow attraction, includes humor, plays-within-the play, history, songs and social commentary. It is the third play in AXIS' season devoted to the work of women writers. Brian Klaas directs a cast headed by Joi Edwards and featuring Melissa Douglass, Stephen Green, Katherine Lyons and a four-woman chorus.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.