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NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | December 22, 1992
One of the toughest obstacles for many women seeking help for alcoholism or drug addiction is finding a secure place for their children while they are in treatment.To that end, Chrysalis House in Pasadena, a drug and alcohol treatment program for women, plans to open the state's first long-term treatment facility for women that allows their children to live with them for up to a year."If you have to worry about whether your kids are safe, it's impossible to concentrate on recovery," said Executive Director Meg Clarke, noting that women often postpone treatment indefinitely because they can't find a safe, secure place for their children.
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NEWS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 24, 2005
You've heard of the "Mommy Track" - that very slow and discriminatory career path that many employers put female workers on if the women have children. Well, now there's another entry to the "Mommy" category, and it's a telling one. The newest term is the "Mommy Wage Gap," and it addresses the discrepancy between what employed mothers and other women earn. According to Heather Boushey, an economist with the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, women with children "earn from 3 to 10 percent less per child compared to employed women without children."
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NEWS
September 21, 1990
Each year, thousands upon thousands of chemically-dependent mothers give birth to premature, developmentally disabled and, in some cases, stillborn children. Often, these preventable tragedies have more to do with prenatal care than the chemicals ravaging their mothers' systems.The Francis Scott Key Medical Center is taking tentative steps toward a solution with an innovative program that marries drug treatment with obstetric care. The Center for Addiction and Pregnancy will provide prenatal and psychiatric help under the same roof, giving pregnant women the necessary tools to improve the odds for their offspring -- and themselves.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 3, 2004
THEY CALL it the Sex and the City vote, single women - 22 million of them by some counts - who didn't vote in 2000 and were thought to hold one of the keys to this presidential election. They were supposed to be a target audience for both George Bush and John Kerry, but a particularly important cohort for Kerry, who couldn't seem to get any traction among married women with children, the so-called security moms. But if the candidates were trying to talk to her, Denise Peterson wasn't listening.
NEWS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 24, 2005
You've heard of the "Mommy Track" - that very slow and discriminatory career path that many employers put female workers on if the women have children. Well, now there's another entry to the "Mommy" category, and it's a telling one. The newest term is the "Mommy Wage Gap," and it addresses the discrepancy between what employed mothers and other women earn. According to Heather Boushey, an economist with the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, women with children "earn from 3 to 10 percent less per child compared to employed women without children."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
The Howard County Health Department is expected to sign an agreement in the next two weeks with an Emmitsburg nonprofit agency to set up the county's first inpatient drug treatment center for pregnant women and women with children.The facility could begin treating its first drug and alcohol addicts by the end of next month, said Frank McGloin, the county health department's addictions director."We're really excited about this," Mr. McGloin said. "We have identified a lot of women who would be in need of this who otherwise would have to go to Baltimore City or other counties, and now we can offer them services close to their homes."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
The Howard County Health Department is expected to sign an agreement in the next two weeks with an Emmitsburg nonprofit agency to set up the county's first inpatient drug treatment center for pregnant women and women with children.The facility could begin treating its first drug and alcohol addicts by the end of next month, said Frank McGloin, the county health department's addictions director."We're really excited about this," Mr. McGloin said. "We have identified a lot of women who would be in need of this who otherwise would have to go to Baltimore City or other counties, and now we can offer them services close to their homes."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 10, 1993
Of all the workers in this country -- of various ages, lif situations and professions -- guess which are most likely to be on the job each day.Men with children under 6.Is this just an ambitious, career-conscious group?Or do the persistent demands from those little mouths send fathers seeking refuge at work each day?The U.S. Department of Labor doesn't offer any explanations, just the stats.And those stats are wide open to interpretation. Some say, sure, it proves that women do all the household work and make the career sacrifices to be at home with kids.
NEWS
July 3, 1992
Maryland has moved another small step toward the kind of welfare reform that discourages behavior detrimental to recipients and society as a whole. With the announcement that the federal government has agreed to waive certain provisions, the state can now impose sanctions against families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children under certain conditions. They include a failure to seek regular prenatal care or annual check ups for adults and children. Also, families with school-age children whose attendance slips below 80 percent without good cause can be penalized.
NEWS
November 29, 1996
PREDICTION: Missing from the Republican National Platform in 2000 will be the GOP's 1996 appeal for elimination of the U.S. Department of Education. Republican governors meeting this week in Grand Rapids, Mich., got some mind-focusing news from their own party's election analysts. Bob Dole lost the women's vote by a whopping margin of 59 to 35 percent. And the most salient issue damaging to the GOP was education.National Committee chairman Haley Barbour lamented the party's failure to explain its education philosophy in more positive terms.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 7, 2004
BOSTON -- May I admit to being relieved that the spotlight is off the "security mom"? I was beginning to cringe every time she came on the screen, touted as the woman whose fear of terrorism would swing the election. The image had evolved into a stereotype of a mother hiding in her cave beside her kids trying to decide which of the two males was more alpha. Now the "security mom" is beginning to take her place as an urban -- or should I say suburban? -- legend. She's slowly receding into the ether of pollsterdom.
FEATURES
By Julia Keller and Julia Keller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 3, 2004
"`No one's young forever.' Well, I just laughed I turned to leave around the corner And the years went past."- "You Can't Go Back," Patti Scialfa It works like this: When you're young, you dream big dreams. Wild dreams. Outrageous dreams. Then you grow up, get married, make a family. Along the way, you wad up the dream like a tie-dyed T-shirt - the kind of bold, crazy thing you'd never wear outside the house anymore - and you stash it in the attic. But Patti Scialfa, Patti Smith and Annie Lennox didn't get the memo.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Yvette Velasquez's divorce left her with a second mortgage, two car payments, and two babies. "Basically, I became the mommy and the daddy," said Velasquez, who moved recently and lives nearer to Camden, N.J. "Now I am the one who has to go check on the noise I hear at night. I never thought I'd have to do that." Her story is one snapshot from a fast-growing group in American society: families headed by single women. The latest data from the 2000 census show that the number of these families grew in the 1990s nearly as fast - about 25 percent - in New Jersey as in the rest of the nation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
The number of American women who are raising children without a husband present grew by more than 25 percent during the 1990s, according to data released today from the 2000 census. The census in April counted nearly 7.6 million households headed by women with children younger than 18 at home, but no husband. There were just over 6 million in 1990. The 10-year rate of increase was nearly twice the 13 percent growth of the U.S. population as a whole. "That is definitely a huge trend, and it is worldwide," said sociologist Steven P. Martin of the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2001
THIRTY STUDENTS IN the Maryland's Tomorrow program at Northeast High School will be traveling to Brooklyn Park Elementary this morning to read stories and have a piece of cake with 60 second-graders to celebrate Read Across America Day. This is the third year that students in Maryland's Tomorrow - a program helping at-risk young people stay in school - have participated in the event marking the birthday of Dr. Seuss with the children at Brooklyn Park....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 7, 1997
BOISE, Idaho -- As Idaho's new welfare law nears the five-month mark, the number of people on welfare has fallen sharply, but the lines at soup kitchens are stretching into the streets.It is a perplexing -- some critics would say, predictable -- juxtaposition as winter weather and the holiday season hit this mountain state.The state's strict new law has resulted in a 70 percent decline in the number of single women with children applying for federal and state cash assistance -- to about 2,000 families as of Dec. 1 from 6,800 families receiving aid before July 1."
NEWS
By James K. Bock and James K. Bock,Staff Writer | April 21, 1992
Marylanders worked and earned more at the dawn of the 1990s than a decade before, but they also paid a prettier penny for housing, newly released census figures show.On the surface at least, the 1980s were years of general prosperity in Maryland as dual wage-earner families spurred an increase in income. Maryland household income rose by almost 16 percent (after inflation) from 1979 to 1989, according to the figures, which don't reflect the economic slide of the early 1990s. The poverty rate decreased across the board.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 20, 1992
Professional women who are married and have children do not sacrifice their careers by pursuing the "mommy track," according to the authors of a new study about women and work.On the other hand, women who single-mindedly devote themselves to work have not guaranteed themselves a place on the fast track, the Canadian study found.Comparing single women without children, married women without children, and married women with children, researchers found that although childless women spent significantly longer hours on the job than working mothers, they did not make more money in their chosen fields.
NEWS
November 23, 1997
Working mothers now have optionsKudos to Elise Armacost for addressing the new backlash toward working mothers in her Nov. 16 column.I am a working mother who works for the complex reasons Ms. Armacost mentions, including economic ones.Working outside the home also gives me certain skills that are different from ones gained from staying at home.I am frustrated by people judging the path I and other working mothers have chosen either by necessity or by interest.It is important to remember that we live in a time when women have a choice.
NEWS
November 29, 1996
PREDICTION: Missing from the Republican National Platform in 2000 will be the GOP's 1996 appeal for elimination of the U.S. Department of Education. Republican governors meeting this week in Grand Rapids, Mich., got some mind-focusing news from their own party's election analysts. Bob Dole lost the women's vote by a whopping margin of 59 to 35 percent. And the most salient issue damaging to the GOP was education.National Committee chairman Haley Barbour lamented the party's failure to explain its education philosophy in more positive terms.
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