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NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 2004
Having an abortion or a miscarriage does not raise a woman's risk of developing breast cancer later in life, according to a large study published today in the medical journal, the Lancet. The report, written by an international consortium of scientists, analyzed 53 studies involving 83,000 women with breast cancer. It found that these women with breast cancer were no more likely to have had a miscarriage or abortion earlier in life than other women. The report is the most exhaustive ever on the topic of breast cancer, abortion and miscarriage, containing at least 90 percent of the world's studies, said Dr. Valerie Beral, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford in England and one of the paper's lead authors.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Women with dense breast tissue will now get an extra warning about cancer. Dense breast tissue, while common in women, can make it harder to detect breast cancer . A new state law requires doctors to send women with dense breast tissue a special letter warning of the danger. Together the patient and doctor can decide on what type of screening should be done. Dr. Diana Pack, a radiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, explains the new law. What are requirements of the new breast density law and when did it go into effect?
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NEWS
April 5, 2000
Women who regularly eat flame-broiled food such as hamburgers, steaks and chicken double their risk of developing breast cancer, according to a preliminary study by scientists at Johns Hopkins Oncology Center. Dr. Kathy Helzlsouer, a cancer epidemiologist, said this week that the risk occurred among women who ate grilled foods at least twice a month. The finding is from a comparison of 110 women with breast cancer and 113 with no cancer history. When meat is cooked in direct contact with heat, flare-ups can cause carcinogens known as heterocyclic amines to collect on the meat.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy rather than risk developing breast cancer hit close to home for Melissa DeSantis, a Bel Air mother of three children. As DeSantis read about Jolie's experience, she began to feel a sense of kinship to the Hollywood star. DeSantis also made the tough decision to have her breasts removed in a February surgery. Like Jolie, she had one of the inherited gene mutations that leaves many women more likely to develop cancer.
FEATURES
May 5, 1992
Breast cancer survivor Patricia Schmoke and Ellie Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority, will be among the speakers at a rally Sunday at Hopkins Plaza to stop the growing numbers of deaths caused by breast cancer."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - The nation's largest breast cancer foundation honored Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, with a lifetime achievement award yesterday for more than a quarter-century of work on breast cancer and women's health issues. Mikulski, who in 1992 sponsored a new initiative setting national quality standards for mammographies, accepted the award from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation at its annual conference. The architect in 1990 of a law to provide low-income women with Pap smears and mammograms, Mikulski followed up in 2000 by helping to push through a measure that allows Medicaid to cover treatment for women with breast or cervical cancer.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 30, 1995
Two studies to be published today confirm that women with breast cancer who have a lumpectomy followed by radiation have the same survival rate as women who have cancerous breasts removed.About 70 percent of women with early breast cancer were alive after 10 years, whether they had a mastectomy or breast-conserving lumpectomy with radiation, according to a review of 36 breast cancer trials that included more than 17,273 women. The review was to be published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 2005
Black women with breast cancer don't live as long as white women, but their deaths are more often caused by other health problems, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings underscore new thinking that patients and their doctors need to pay more attention to eating better, managing salt intake and exercising regularly. "Everyone worries about cancer staring them in the face, but the reality is, most breast cancer patients die of something else," said Diana Dyer, a registered dietitian from Ann Arbor, Mich.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
Five-and-a-half years ago, some of Marsha Oakley's friends thought she was bonkers."Friends said, 'Just cut it off and don't have the radiation,' " Mrs. Oakley, 44, said yesterday.But being an independent thinker, Mrs. Oakley said she chose not to have her right breast removed in a mastectomy and instead chose what was then a new procedure called lumpectomy, where only the cancerous portion of the breast and surrounding tissue are removed.She also had to undergo five to six weeks of radiation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1995
A gene that was thought to cause only a small proportion of breast cancers now appears to be at the heart of nearly all of them, researchers report.The finding may lead to new ways to give a prognosis and to treat breast cancer, but there is no immediate action recommended for women who have breast cancer or are concerned about a genetic predisposition to the disease.Researchers are excited about the finding because it means that the rare forms of breast cancer that run in families appear to be not distinct from the most common forms of breast cancer, but instead linked to them.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
Two-time breast cancer survivor Lillie Shockney knows mammograms save lives. Her patients at Johns Hopkins Hospital heed her advice when she implores that screening can detect the disease early enough to fight it. And women all over the world e-mail her anxious questions about how to protect themselves from cancer at all costs. When should they begin having breast X-rays and how often? Are mammograms sufficient or should they demand sophisticated MRI scans? What about their daughters - how soon should they have mammograms?
NEWS
By Article by Stephanie Desmon, Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri and Article by Stephanie Desmon, Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com and chiaki.kawajiri@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
For the past two days, Annie Siple has patiently crisscrossed the Johns Hopkins medical campus for test after test, being scanned by big machines, pricked with small needles, fastened to electrodes, injected with dye. Soon she will find out who is winning, Annie or the cancer. Not for one minute has she worried about the results. How could the news be bad, she is wondering when she is led into a tiny exam room. She looks and feels terrific on this May afternoon. Her cancer appeared first in her breast.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | December 26, 2007
A gene mutation strongly identified with Jewish breast cancer patients has also turned up in a small but significant percentage of Hispanic patients, scientists are reporting today. In their study of more than 3,000 women with the disease, scientists also found a surprisingly high prevalence among young black women with breast cancer. The finding has led some oncologists to suggest genetic screening for patients of different ethnic groups, because carriers have a greater chance of recurrence and can pass that risk to their daughters.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | October 25, 2007
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates -- First lady Laura Bush came to the Middle East this week to raise breast cancer awareness, but her mission has been couched in a gracious plea for mutual understanding and world peace. At each stop along her journey, which by week's end will have included the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Jordan, Mrs. Bush has managed a quiet coup of diplomacy. The topic may be breast cancer, but the message is healing in a broader sense. In a world that at times seems impossibly at odds, what could be more unifying than shared concern about a disease that ravages mothers, sisters and wives?
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | November 5, 2006
When Tracie Hoyt found a lump in her breast last summer, doctors confirmed that it was cancer. After surgery to remove the lump, she expected radiation treatments and months of chemotherapy. A self-described workaholic, Hoyt worried that she would be too ill to deliver mail along her Cockeysville postal route. "You hear how terrible chemo can be on your body and that people are really sick," she said. To her surprise, Hoyt, 46, was spared chemotherapy. A genetic test known as Oncotype DX provided a look at the inner workings of the tumor, helping her doctor predict that chances were low that her particular type of cancer would return.
NEWS
By JAMIE TALAN and JAMIE TALAN,NEWSDAY | June 7, 2006
NEW YORK -- Pre-menopausal black women with breast cancer are twice as likely to have a more aggressive tumor than non-black women of any age or post-menopausal black women, scientists report. Doctors hope the finding will encourage more adult black women to undergo routine mammography. "This is powerful information," said Dr. Lisa A. Carey, medical director of the University of North Carolina's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and lead author of the study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By JAMIE TALAN and JAMIE TALAN,NEWSDAY | June 7, 2006
NEW YORK -- Pre-menopausal black women with breast cancer are twice as likely to have a more aggressive tumor than non-black women of any age or post-menopausal black women, scientists report. Doctors hope the finding will encourage more adult black women to undergo routine mammography. "This is powerful information," said Dr. Lisa A. Carey, medical director of the University of North Carolina's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and lead author of the study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 2006
Doctors who treat women with breast cancer are glimpsing the possibility of a vastly different future. After years of adding more and more to the regimen - more drugs, shorter intervals between chemotherapy sessions, higher doses - they are now wondering whether many women could skip chemotherapy. If the new ideas are validated by large studies, such as two that are just beginning, treatment of breast cancer would markedly change. Today, national guidelines call for giving chemotherapy to nearly every one of the nearly 200,000 women whose breast cancer is diagnosed each year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 2006
Doctors who treat women with breast cancer are glimpsing the possibility of a vastly different future. After years of adding more and more to the regimen - more drugs, shorter intervals between chemotherapy sessions, higher doses - they are now wondering whether many women could skip chemotherapy. If the new ideas are validated by large studies, such as two that are just beginning, treatment of breast cancer would markedly change. Today, national guidelines call for giving chemotherapy to nearly every one of the nearly 200,000 women whose breast cancer is diagnosed each year.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 2005
Black women with breast cancer don't live as long as white women, but their deaths are more often caused by other health problems, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings underscore new thinking that patients and their doctors need to pay more attention to eating better, managing salt intake and exercising regularly. "Everyone worries about cancer staring them in the face, but the reality is, most breast cancer patients die of something else," said Diana Dyer, a registered dietitian from Ann Arbor, Mich.
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