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NEWS
March 4, 2012
March is designated as Women's History Month, an opportunity to remember the role women have played in U.S. history since our nation's inception. To serve in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, Deborah Sampson, a school teacher, disguised herself as a man to become one of only a handful of women with documented military combat service from that era. She was wounded in battle in 1782 just outside Tarrytown, N.Y., where she was struck by two musket balls in the leg. Fearful she'd be discovered, she removed one of the bullets herself using a pen knife and allowed the other to heal over.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
When retired Master Sgt. Sheryl A. Webb left the U.S. Army in 1997, she was scarcely aware of services that U.S. Veterans Administration hospitals offered specifically for women. That was well before women became the fastest growing demographic group within the U.S. veteran population, and before VA hospital officials made a concerted effort to get the word out about its women's services. On Friday, Webb marveled as she walked through the Women Veteran's Clinic inside the new $4.7 million Fort Meade VA Outpatient clinic.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
When retired Master Sgt. Sheryl A. Webb left the U.S. Army in 1997, she was scarcely aware of services that U.S. Veterans Administration hospitals offered specifically for women. That was well before women became the fastest growing demographic group within the U.S. veteran population, and before VA hospital officials made a concerted effort to get the word out about its women's services. On Friday, Webb marveled as she walked through the Women Veteran's Clinic inside the new $4.7 million Fort Meade VA Outpatient clinic.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
Thousands of military jobs have opened up to women in recent years, but not those in the front-line combat units. That may soon change, however, as a result of a lawsuit brought late last year by four women veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, including Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt of Gaithersburg. Their complaint alleges that banning women from combat roles solely on the basis of their gender violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution and restricts women's opportunities for career advancement and higher earnings and pensions.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
When traditional histories of war mention women -- if at all -- it is usually as a footnote of some oddity like Deborah Sampson, a housewife during the Revolutionary War, who disguised herself as a man to join the Massachusetts Regiment.That is no longer possible. Debates may rage about women in combat, but women have become such an integral part of the nation's armed services that national leaders routinely refer to "our service men and women." That change came gradually, but it was thrust into our consciousness during Operation Desert Storm, with almost as many stories about mothers saying goodbye to their children as of fathers marching off to war.With the unveiling on Veterans' Day of a statue honoring women who served in Vietnam, military women are beginning to get public recognition for their contributions to the defense of the country.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Two statewide organizations endorsed sitting Circuit Judges Donna Hill Staton and Diane O. Leasure yesterday in their bids to retain their seats in the Nov. 5 judicial election.Members of the Maryland State Bar Association and the Maryland chapter of Women Veterans of America said they chose the sitting judges over their challengers -- District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and Jonathan Scott Smith -- because of their judicial temperament and experience.The state bar group's announcement was actually a "reinforcement" of its earlier endorsement of Hill Staton and Leasure in last spring's primary and its opposition to contested judicial elections, said spokeswoman Janet Eveleth.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
Diane Carlson Evans, a former Army nurse in Vietnam, looked at Frederick Hart's moving statue of three infantrymen that had been added to the Vietnam War Memorial and wondered, "Where are the women?"The names of the eight women who had died in Vietnam were among the 58,000 inscribed in the wall. But 11,000 military women served in the 12-year-long war. Almost all were nurses or medical personnel. Their quick action saved the lives of many of the 350,000 wounded soldiers who passed through their units.
NEWS
November 20, 1993
AS RECENTLY as two years ago, it was possible for an America-firster or true-blue trade unionist to get outfitted head to toe by clothes made in the U.S.A.No longer, as evidenced by a tour of the "outlet" mall in Queenstown where Routes 50 and 301 converge. A shopper can still find an occasional item made in the United States, but the majority of clothing bearing U.S. brand names is "made" or "assembled" elsewhere. In some stores that clearly don't manufacture their own apparel, not a single American label can be found.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | March 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The nation's health care system for veterans came under attack at a congressional hearing yesterday when several witnesses accused the government of failing to respond fully to the health needs of female veterans.Critics of the Department of Veterans Affairs said government hospitals provide too little privacy and limited medical services for women. Even doctors at the Baltimore VAMedical Center -- which has a relatively large number of female patients -- say that for every woman who walks through its doors, many choose to stay away.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
Eighteen months after she enlisted in the Army, Wanda Porter fell from a 50-foot tower, shattering her feet and ending her military career. Today, after three surgeries, a year in a veterans hospital, a failed marriage, bouts of depression and 17 years of therapy, Porter is taking classes at Baltimore County Community College and planning to complete a degree in psychology. She credits Veterans Affairs with helping her recover and was eager to attend a networking fair especially for women veterans at the Baltimore VA Medical Center on Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Landlocked in downtown Baltimore and unable to bear the weight of more floors, the Baltimore VA Medical Center has expanded inward. The seven-story building, which occupies a city block on Greene Street between Baltimore and Fayette streets, has enclosed its signature glass front and taken footage from its atrium to increase space on every floor for offices, clinics, conference rooms, research labs, and its renowned robotics program. The $11 million project, which coincides with the hospital's 20th anniversary, gives the acute-care facility for veterans an extra 15,000 square feet.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
March is designated as Women's History Month, an opportunity to remember the role women have played in U.S. history since our nation's inception. To serve in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, Deborah Sampson, a school teacher, disguised herself as a man to become one of only a handful of women with documented military combat service from that era. She was wounded in battle in 1782 just outside Tarrytown, N.Y., where she was struck by two musket balls in the leg. Fearful she'd be discovered, she removed one of the bullets herself using a pen knife and allowed the other to heal over.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
When Staff Sgt. Dennis Robinson left the Army after tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, he couldn't wait to get back home to Baltimore to resume civilian life and earn his master's and law degrees. But even as he reestablished his identity, Robinson realized something vital was missing. "I found I was lacking the things I liked about the military: the camaraderie, the talking to guys about the things only we understand," said Robinson, 28. To fill the void, he began volunteering for veterans groups, where he found others with similar yearnings.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
Eighteen months after she enlisted in the Army, Wanda Porter fell from a 50-foot tower, shattering her feet and ending her military career. Today, after three surgeries, a year in a veterans hospital, a failed marriage, bouts of depression and 17 years of therapy, Porter is taking classes at Baltimore County Community College and planning to complete a degree in psychology. She credits Veterans Affairs with helping her recover and was eager to attend a networking fair especially for women veterans at the Baltimore VA Medical Center on Saturday.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The first shelter for homeless veterans in Washington is expected to open sometime this summer.The shelter will be the only transitional shelter in the country that will set aside a building for female veterans and their children, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.Pete Dougherty, program manager for the Veterans Help program at the VA, said the shelter was named after Sarah McClendon, 87, because she has been pestering the government to do more for women veterans for about as long as she has been posing questions to presidents.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The first shelter for homeless veterans in Washington is expected to open sometime this summer.The shelter will be the only transitional shelter in the country that will set aside a building for female veterans and their children, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.Pete Dougherty, program manager for the Veterans Help program at the VA, said the shelter was named after Sarah McClendon, 87, because she has been pestering the government to do more for women veterans for about as long as she has been posing questions to presidents.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 11, 1992
During the long nightmare that was Vietnam, thousands of U.S. military women braved enemy fire, saved horribly maimed soldiers and comforted dying teen-agers.Yet, 17 years after the war's end, these women remain Vietnam's "invisible veterans."Former Army nurse Diane Carlson Evans said she first felt the sting of the oversight when she attended the 1982 dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Only eight women are among the 58,183 names of war dead etched on the Wall."I thought about the women I had served with and the fact that they were nowhere to be seen," Ms. Evans recalled.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | November 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Savoring their long-delayed moment of recognition, thousands of women veterans from across the nation triumphantly gathered on the Mall yesterday to dedicate a memorial honoring their service in Vietnam.An estimated 25,000 people turned out for the ceremony, many still wearing their faded wartime uniforms in the bright autumn sunshine. Some of the women veterans held bittersweet makeshift reunions at the nearby Vietnam Memorial, whose wall bears the names of the 58,191 Americans who died during the war. Eight of them were women.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Two statewide organizations endorsed sitting Circuit Judges Donna Hill Staton and Diane O. Leasure yesterday in their bids to retain their seats in the Nov. 5 judicial election.Members of the Maryland State Bar Association and the Maryland chapter of Women Veterans of America said they chose the sitting judges over their challengers -- District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and Jonathan Scott Smith -- because of their judicial temperament and experience.The state bar group's announcement was actually a "reinforcement" of its earlier endorsement of Hill Staton and Leasure in last spring's primary and its opposition to contested judicial elections, said spokeswoman Janet Eveleth.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | March 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The nation's health care system for veterans came under attack at a congressional hearing yesterday when several witnesses accused the government of failing to respond fully to the health needs of female veterans.Critics of the Department of Veterans Affairs said government hospitals provide too little privacy and limited medical services for women. Even doctors at the Baltimore VAMedical Center -- which has a relatively large number of female patients -- say that for every woman who walks through its doors, many choose to stay away.
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