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SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
After an absence of nearly 25 years, Baltimore is being talked about these days in the context of international men's and women's soccer.Poland's national team was to have played the U.S. national men's team in a friendly, or exhibition, match Aug. 7 at 7:30 p.m. at Memorial Stadium. But sources familiar with the event said an agreement that U.S. Soccer officials thought they had with the Polish team has fallen through, and the Americans are trying to seal a deal with another traveling national team for the same date.
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NEWS
By Laura Vecsey and Laura Vecsey,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2004
ATHENS - When she heard "The Star-Spangled Banner" playing before yesterday's game, Julie Foudy - chief loudmouth and cut-up for the U.S. women's soccer team - felt an uncharacteristic lump in her throat. "This one, it got to me. I had to tell myself, `Get yourself together.' But I was thinking, `I don't want this to be my last anthem,'" said Foudy, 33. It wasn't. The thing about winning the gold medal at the Olympics is that they play the winner's anthem after you step on the podium.
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SPORTS
By Steve Davis and Steve Davis,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 5, 1999
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- The first congratulatory hugs weren't for Michelle Akers, whose second-half goal gave the U.S. team a little breathing room in yesterday's Women's World Cup semifinal.Nor were those embraces aimed at women's soccer spokesperson Mia Hamm, who engineered that pull- away goal against the underdog Brazilians.The first ones went to U.S. goalkeeper Briana Scurry, whose Independence Day stand helped drag her sometimes tired-looking team into Saturday's tournament final in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 12, 2003
A LITTLE bit about several things being talked about, or that should be noted, in Howard County's amateur sports community: SOCCER: So what if it's Sweden vs. Germany for the 2003 Women's World Cup championship and not the United States national team? Watch the game today on ABC-TV, 1 p.m. The sport is what matters most of all, as can be attested to by all those thousands of girls and grown women who play it almost year-round in Howard County. The American women - role models for all those female players and a lot of boys and men, too - lost honorably (3-0 officially, but 1-0 when it mattered)
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | June 3, 1997
Baltimore officials have decided not to apply to be one of the sites for the 1999 Women's World Cup tournament.Women's World Cup officials had asked the Maryland Stadium Authority if it was interested in having the Ravens' stadium at Camden Yards be one of a handful of tournament venues in the United States.The Ravens, who under their lease will share with the state the proceeds of non-NFL events held at the stadium, said they were too busy planning for their 1997 season debut at the stadium to participate.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 18, 1999
It was a landmark moment for women's sports.A victory over middle-aged male grumpiness.And it was fun.That's how the United States' Women's World Cup success should be remembered.Assigning it any more importance would be a mistake.No, it's not going to spawn a thriving women's pro league.And no, it doesn't mean millions of women are going to start spending months on the couch, gnawing on chips and numbly watching whatever games show up on cable.Women have more important things to do, such as balancing work, exercise and motherhood.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 16, 2003
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Five days before the start of the event that was to provide a needed boost to the 3-year-old women's professional soccer league, its board of governors announced yesterday that a lack of funding had forced the league to suspend operations. John Hendricks, founder of the Women's United Soccer Association and its board chairman, said he hoped the suspension would provide enough time "to allow a miracle to happen." But chances the league will revive appear minimal. "It's definitely a sad day for women's sports," said Julie Foudy, co-captain of the U.S. women's national team and a WUSA governor.
NEWS
July 17, 1999
Soccer team has women on a roll The Sun's front-page article on the victory of the U.S. women's soccer team in the World Cup ("U.S. soccer fantasy comes true," July 11) said: Brandi Chastain "might not have been thinking about being a role model as she stripped off her jersey in celebration after making the winning penalty kick." That made me laugh. She is the perfect role model. She is breaking the mold that society has cast, and girls everywhere are on a roll. Nothing has impressed me more than the heart and soul and the skill, determination and commitment of those World Cup athletes.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Mia Hamm looks forward to the day when there are no fledgling leagues to promote, no World Cups to win. After she retires - a notion that prompts Hamm to break off a Mona Lisa smile - she has no plans, or at least none she'll share. "I'm doing nothing for six months," she said. Likewise, Hamm looks forward to the day when she can take a run for the simple pleasure of running. No more drills. No more wind sprints. No more chasing people around the soccer pitch, getting kicked in the shins, grabbed.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
HERSHEY, Pa. -- The U.S. national team gave itself a psychological boost last night, edging China, one of its main rivals for women's soccer supremacy, 2-1, on virtually the game's final play.Substitute Tisha Venturini's goal two minutes into stoppage time was the winner, only two minutes after she had entered the game wondering why she had been put in so late.U.S. coach Tony DiCicco, in his 100th game, said he had told the rail-thin Venturini, once a U.S. starter but now struggling to get back into the lineup, that he would try to sub her in late "to score a goal."
SPORTS
By John Jeansonne and John Jeansonne,NEWSDAY | October 6, 2003
PORTLAND, Ore. - Close doesn't count in soccer, either. An entire 90 minutes of pounding, pushing and pleading for a score never amounted to anything for the United States last night. And though the home team controlled the run of play virtually throughout this Women's World Cup semifinal, Germany got an early score, never cracked on defense and eventually slipped two insurance goals past the exhausted Americans in stoppage time to dethrone the champions, 3-0. "We brought our `A' game in terms of the attacking," U.S. coach April Heinrichs said.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 21, 2003
TURN ON THE TV, go to the neighborhood tavern and watch some of the Women's World Cup, whose broadcasts start today with the U.S. team's 12:30 p.m. opener against Sweden at RFK Stadium on ABC. That's the advice from defender Joy Fawcett. The 35-year-old U.S. national team veteran believes it's again time for everyone to take a look. Mia Hamm is better fit and a better player than ever before - if that's possible. The Swedes should give the United States a good match. And if Germany and the U.S. team advance to their destined semifinal, it should prove an epic showdown.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey and Laura Vecsey,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
Of the many compelling characteristics of the U.S. national women's soccer team - brains, skill, speed, strength, charisma, humor, tenacity - one particular trait has always ultimately defined them. "We want to win. We have a total addiction to winning," said April Heinrichs, a former player and current head coach. It helps to boil things down to the essential element now that the 2003 Women's World Cup is about to begin. The 32-game, 16-team tournament will kick off in Philadelphia today.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 16, 2003
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Five days before the start of the event that was to provide a needed boost to the 3-year-old women's professional soccer league, its board of governors announced yesterday that a lack of funding had forced the league to suspend operations. John Hendricks, founder of the Women's United Soccer Association and its board chairman, said he hoped the suspension would provide enough time "to allow a miracle to happen." But chances the league will revive appear minimal. "It's definitely a sad day for women's sports," said Julie Foudy, co-captain of the U.S. women's national team and a WUSA governor.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2003
Four years ago, the Women's World Cup electrified audiences nationwide, assuredly raising soccer's awareness. You had to be near-dead to not have known about Brandi Chastain's penalty kick (and, in resulting glee, jersey removal) that beat China for the United States before 90,185 in the Rose Bowl and millions more on television. On Saturday, the fourth Women's World Cup begins in Philadelphia, with the American team opening next Sunday in Washington. Originally to be played in China, this quadrennial pinnacle of women's soccer was shifted to this country because of the SARS outbreak.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Mia Hamm looks forward to the day when there are no fledgling leagues to promote, no World Cups to win. After she retires - a notion that prompts Hamm to break off a Mona Lisa smile - she has no plans, or at least none she'll share. "I'm doing nothing for six months," she said. Likewise, Hamm looks forward to the day when she can take a run for the simple pleasure of running. No more drills. No more wind sprints. No more chasing people around the soccer pitch, getting kicked in the shins, grabbed.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey and Laura Vecsey,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
Of the many compelling characteristics of the U.S. national women's soccer team - brains, skill, speed, strength, charisma, humor, tenacity - one particular trait has always ultimately defined them. "We want to win. We have a total addiction to winning," said April Heinrichs, a former player and current head coach. It helps to boil things down to the essential element now that the 2003 Women's World Cup is about to begin. The 32-game, 16-team tournament will kick off in Philadelphia today.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
The U.S. women's national team, which captured America's attention when it won the 1999 Women's World Cup, has chased down another dream, this time bringing along friends. It's called the Women's United Soccer Association. The first women's professional soccer league in the United States, the WUSA will kick off its inaugural season at 2 p.m. today when Mia Hamm and the Washington Freedom get a visit from Brandi Chastain and the Bay Area CyberRays at RFK Stadium. Unlike most start-up leagues, this one has a fast head start.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | July 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - A rainstorm of biblical proportions had turned the soccer field at RFK Stadium into a slippery stew of mud Wednesday evening. The treacherous conditions did little to stop Washington Freedom scoring stars Mia Hamm and Abby Wambach from tackling any nearby Philadelphia Charge player, or from dribbling like madwomen through double teams, knee ligaments be damned. In the slop, even with a sore knee, a midfielder as skilled and hungry as Hamm can't be knocked off her shark-attack mentality to drive to the net. What a sight.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | June 27, 2001
What does a female athlete look like? She has rippling muscles. She is as light as a gazelle. She is petite. She is husky. She can run for miles, lift hundreds of pounds, explode off a starting block, twirl in the air. She is beautiful. In 1994, journalist Jane Gottesman began trying to answer that question her own way. She contacted newspapers, college archives, sports magazines and museums, asking for pictures of women participating in sports. The results of her search go on display today through Jan. 2 at the Smithsonian Institution.
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