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By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- It took them awhile to get over jitters of playing before a record-breaking 78,972 fans, but the U.S. national team opened the 1999 Women's World Cup yesterday with an emphatically punctuated 3-0 win over Denmark."
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SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
Lost in the gush over the American victory in the Women's World Cup has been a tournament in Mexico for the men's team, selection of which coach Bruce Arena announced in Denver yesterday.The U.S. men open July 24 in Guadalajara against weak New Zealand, representing Oceania in the FIFA Confederations Cup.The tournament is intended to match the best national teams from each FIFA region of the world, but that has been tainted by less-than-enthusiastic participation. In fact, World Cup champion France took a pass.
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SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
Lost in the gush over the American victory in the Women's World Cup has been a tournament in Mexico for the men's team, selection of which coach Bruce Arena announced in Denver yesterday.The U.S. men open July 24 in Guadalajara against weak New Zealand, representing Oceania in the FIFA Confederations Cup.The tournament is intended to match the best national teams from each FIFA region of the world, but that has been tainted by less-than-enthusiastic participation. In fact, World Cup champion France took a pass.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1999
Unlike the 1991 U.S. team that won the first women's world soccer championship, arrived at New York's Kennedy airport in anonymity and disbanded for nearly a year, this year's World Cup champions will go neither unsung nor unemployed for long.Many, if not all, will regroup later this year to begin training for the September 2000 Olympics in Australia -- which, incidentally, could be the last international hurrah for as many as seven or eight American stars now in their late 20s and early 30s.Also, no schedule has been announced, but the U.S. team assuredly will put on another buildup tour, a la this year's, before flying off to Sydney in quest of another gold medal.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1999
MARTINSVILLE, N.J. -- Twenty women are scheduled to arrive by bus at the posh Pingry School for about 90 minutes of soccer practice this morning.Practice figures to be routine for the day before a big game -- probably polishing "set pieces," or tricky scoring plays for certain game situations, and light conditioning.But unlike practices earlier this week on what the 138-year-old school calls its "World Cup field," this one is secret. No doting 12-year-olds or their soccer moms and dads. No media allowed until 1 p.m. After that, it's solitude for these world-class athletes, time to reflect and focus.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
FAIRFAX, Va. -- U.S. women's soccer coach Tony DiCicco prattles at times over the importance of what he calls "personality players."He means "stars." Such as Mia Hamm, possibly the most widely publicized No. 9 in sports today, and Michelle Akers, the chronic fatigue syndrome-coper, oldest U.S. player and legend in the sport. Such as Julie Foudy, the chattiest midfielder who ever rejected admission to Stanford's medical school and punctuated it by kicking a doc for a beer maker's Women's World Cup TV ad.Not that she's anonymous, but the name Brandi Chastain doesn't jump to mind as fast when DiCicco turns cliche-monger.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1999
Unlike the 1991 U.S. team that won the first women's world soccer championship, arrived at New York's Kennedy airport in anonymity and disbanded for nearly a year, this year's World Cup champions will go neither unsung nor unemployed for long.Many, if not all, will regroup later this year to begin training for the September 2000 Olympics in Australia -- which, incidentally, could be the last international hurrah for as many as seven or eight American stars now in their late 20s and early 30s.Also, no schedule has been announced, but the U.S. team assuredly will put on another buildup tour, a la this year's, before flying off to Sydney in quest of another gold medal.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
LANDOVER -- Meet Elizabeth, Lindsay, Betsy, E. J., Jessica, Meaghan and the rest, ages 13 and 14. They're fearsome athletes on one of Maryland's elite soccer teams. Most have been kicking soccer balls since age 5. They have no concept of life before women's sports. They weren't even on Earth before Title IX.Hence, their five straight hours of SCREAMING Thursday night, when the U.S. women beat Germany, 3-2.Women's World Cup Soccer filled Jack Kent Cooke Stadium: Imagine that. Suddenly, the teen-agers, who play on a Division I team from Howard County called Coventry, were cheering not for Cal Ripkens or Brady Andersons but for girl-heroes just like them.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
The 20 women chosen to wear America's colors in quest of the third Women's World Cup, the final round of which opens 31 days from today in East Rutherford, N.J., were named yesterday in Chicago.Coach Tony DiCicco's roster includes 13 players from his Olympic gold medalists three years ago, as well as six who helped the Americans win the first women's world championship in 1991.But it's no stand-pat roster. DiCicco has blended in eight young players, who will get to experience the intensity and glamour of competing in what, off ticket sales and world TV commitments, will be history's most widely watched women's sports event.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 2, 1999
LANDOVER -- Hundreds of cameras flashed moments after the final whistle sounded, the crowd of 54,642 rising on this muggy, magical night. Several German players collapsed to the field in dejection. The American players sprinted toward each other, raising their arms in exultation, embracing.It's a brave new world. It's a big new world. It's a world not just for fathers and sons, but mothers and daughters, a world that once seemed so implausible, but now is as real as the pain in Michelle Akers' shoulder or the relief on Brandi Chastain's face.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
LANDOVER -- Meet Elizabeth, Lindsay, Betsy, E. J., Jessica, Meaghan and the rest, ages 13 and 14. They're fearsome athletes on one of Maryland's elite soccer teams. Most have been kicking soccer balls since age 5. They have no concept of life before women's sports. They weren't even on Earth before Title IX.Hence, their five straight hours of SCREAMING Thursday night, when the U.S. women beat Germany, 3-2.Women's World Cup Soccer filled Jack Kent Cooke Stadium: Imagine that. Suddenly, the teen-agers, who play on a Division I team from Howard County called Coventry, were cheering not for Cal Ripkens or Brady Andersons but for girl-heroes just like them.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 2, 1999
LANDOVER -- Hundreds of cameras flashed moments after the final whistle sounded, the crowd of 54,642 rising on this muggy, magical night. Several German players collapsed to the field in dejection. The American players sprinted toward each other, raising their arms in exultation, embracing.It's a brave new world. It's a big new world. It's a world not just for fathers and sons, but mothers and daughters, a world that once seemed so implausible, but now is as real as the pain in Michelle Akers' shoulder or the relief on Brandi Chastain's face.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
FAIRFAX, Va. -- U.S. women's soccer coach Tony DiCicco prattles at times over the importance of what he calls "personality players."He means "stars." Such as Mia Hamm, possibly the most widely publicized No. 9 in sports today, and Michelle Akers, the chronic fatigue syndrome-coper, oldest U.S. player and legend in the sport. Such as Julie Foudy, the chattiest midfielder who ever rejected admission to Stanford's medical school and punctuated it by kicking a doc for a beer maker's Women's World Cup TV ad.Not that she's anonymous, but the name Brandi Chastain doesn't jump to mind as fast when DiCicco turns cliche-monger.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1999
The U.S. team could play its biggest game thus far in the Women's World Cup before its smallest crowd in Thursday night's quarterfinal doubleheader at Landover.Despite saying ticket sales are near Jack Kent Cooke Stadium's "downsized," 41,110 capacity, World Cup officials in Los Angeles decided late yesterday not to open the stadium's spacious upper decks, which can accommodate another 39,000. Downsizing is a marketing term that means officials felt incapable of filling one of the nation's largest stadia.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- It took them awhile to get over jitters of playing before a record-breaking 78,972 fans, but the U.S. national team opened the 1999 Women's World Cup yesterday with an emphatically punctuated 3-0 win over Denmark."
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1999
MARTINSVILLE, N.J. -- Twenty women are scheduled to arrive by bus at the posh Pingry School for about 90 minutes of soccer practice this morning.Practice figures to be routine for the day before a big game -- probably polishing "set pieces," or tricky scoring plays for certain game situations, and light conditioning.But unlike practices earlier this week on what the 138-year-old school calls its "World Cup field," this one is secret. No doting 12-year-olds or their soccer moms and dads. No media allowed until 1 p.m. After that, it's solitude for these world-class athletes, time to reflect and focus.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1999
The U.S. team could play its biggest game thus far in the Women's World Cup before its smallest crowd in Thursday night's quarterfinal doubleheader at Landover.Despite saying ticket sales are near Jack Kent Cooke Stadium's "downsized," 41,110 capacity, World Cup officials in Los Angeles decided late yesterday not to open the stadium's spacious upper decks, which can accommodate another 39,000. Downsizing is a marketing term that means officials felt incapable of filling one of the nation's largest stadia.
SPORTS
By George Diaz and George Diaz,Orlando Sentinel | December 26, 1991
OVIEDO, Fla. -- Michelle Akers-Stahl lives the contradiction every time she leaves this country.She is one of the most famous female athletes in the world, mobbed by worshiping fans throughout Europe and Asia. Yet at home she rarely warrants a second look at the checkout line at the neighborhood grocery."Around the world we get mobbed by people. They want pictures, autographs," Akers-Stahl said. "In China, I couldn't wait to get back to the United States, where I could be anonymous. It was crazy.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
The 20 women chosen to wear America's colors in quest of the third Women's World Cup, the final round of which opens 31 days from today in East Rutherford, N.J., were named yesterday in Chicago.Coach Tony DiCicco's roster includes 13 players from his Olympic gold medalists three years ago, as well as six who helped the Americans win the first women's world championship in 1991.But it's no stand-pat roster. DiCicco has blended in eight young players, who will get to experience the intensity and glamour of competing in what, off ticket sales and world TV commitments, will be history's most widely watched women's sports event.
SPORTS
By George Diaz and George Diaz,Orlando Sentinel | December 26, 1991
OVIEDO, Fla. -- Michelle Akers-Stahl lives the contradiction every time she leaves this country.She is one of the most famous female athletes in the world, mobbed by worshiping fans throughout Europe and Asia. Yet at home she rarely warrants a second look at the checkout line at the neighborhood grocery."Around the world we get mobbed by people. They want pictures, autographs," Akers-Stahl said. "In China, I couldn't wait to get back to the United States, where I could be anonymous. It was crazy.
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