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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 2006
Throughout the 1980s and early '90s, women of all economic levels - poor, middle-class and rich - steadily gained on their male counterparts in the work force. By the mid-1990s, women earned more than 75 cents for every dollar in hourly pay that men did, up from 65 cents 15 years earlier. Largely without notice, however, one big group of women has stopped making progress: those with a four-year college degree. The gap between their pay and that of male college graduates has widened slightly since the mid-'90s.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 3, 2010
The Pill turns 50 this month, and I swear I am feeling every one of those years. For me, that little disc of pink and white birth control pills has morphed into one of those day-of-the-week pill storage containers that's filled with all sorts of medicines, none of which holds the promise of a wild night of sex. The Pill is now "the pills," and they hold out hope of less joint pain and less risk of clogged arteries and dying of a sudden heart...
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NEWS
August 21, 1996
THE TIME when women's work was in the home is long past in this country, and the same trend holds true around the world.According to a new report from the International Labor Organization, by the year 2000, women will participate in the labor force in about the same percentage as men in many industrialized countries.In developing countries, where few women have the luxury of leisure, female workers will make up about one-third of the formal labor force by then.Considering their household responsibilities, women in most countries work longer hours.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 2006
Throughout the 1980s and early '90s, women of all economic levels - poor, middle-class and rich - steadily gained on their male counterparts in the work force. By the mid-1990s, women earned more than 75 cents for every dollar in hourly pay that men did, up from 65 cents 15 years earlier. Largely without notice, however, one big group of women has stopped making progress: those with a four-year college degree. The gap between their pay and that of male college graduates has widened slightly since the mid-'90s.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 28, 1992
Rome -- "At least 60 million female adults and children in Asia are missing and feared dead,'' reported the New York Times at the end of last year.Recently released census data in China and India show that in both countries the sex ratio of the population became more skewed toward males over the course of the last decade.The reason? Many girls are killed at birth, and others die because they are given less food than male babies. Families spend scarce resources summoning a doctor when a boy is sick, but decide they cannot afford to do the same for girls.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Frank, the driver, dropped off the trash bin early yesterday morning and left. And Eric Hoel - the only other guy on the job - stayed to supervise the recovery of the wood trim that a dozen volunteers stripped from a Waverly rowhouse's interior as part of the Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity home rehabilitation project. But his duties stopped there. This is the house that Jack didn't build. Laura did. And Lisa and Missy, MaryAnn and JoAnn, Terry and Dayle, and the rest of the 12-member female construction crew assisted her by taking sledgehammers to plaster walls and crowbars to baseboards to renovate the 1920s brick house and prepare it for a new owner.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac | September 29, 1991
In a quiet revolution in the nation's countryside, rural women have begun to recast their lives and their communities and, in making those changes, are significantly reshaping the culture of rural America.From the hollows of Appalachia to the prairies of the Midwest, up the country and down, rural women are becoming community and family leaders in ways unfamiliar to them, creating new traditions while losing some of the old ones.The movement has no name, but it does have a voice -- lots of voices.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Women's work - knitting, sewing, cleaning, raising kids - is menial. It's trivial, marginal and undesirable. It has no value. That's what Columbia resident and artist Shin-Hee Chin says many people think, and that's what she's trying to debunk with her exhibit, Realm of Bliss, showing at Columbia Art Center through June 2. "I want to show that seemingly menial female work can be a source of pleasure and power for women," says Chin, 42. She says it...
NEWS
February 20, 1992
It is not uncommon for women to put in more hours of labor than men, especially in rural areas of the Third World. By the time they take care of household chores, tend to crops or livestock and see to children and other family needs, many women have spent 16 to 18 hours just getting through the daily routine. Meanwhile, the average day's work for Third World men hovers closer to eight to 10 hours. But the importance of women's work has not been taken into account in traditional economic analyses.
NEWS
May 2, 1995
Men may work from dusk to dawn, but women's work is never done. Remember that old nursery rhyme? Growing up prior to the women's liberation movement, you knew exactly what "women's work" meant. Today, there's really no such thing.A recent study of census data by the Program for Applied Research at Queens College shows women have dramatically increased their percentage of jobs traditionally held by men. But there has been no similarly large movement of men to take jobs traditionally held by women.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
Women's work - knitting, sewing, cleaning, raising kids - is menial. It's trivial, marginal and undesirable. It has no value. That's what Columbia resident and artist Shin-Hee Chin says many people think, and that's what she's trying to debunk with her exhibit, Realm of Bliss, showing at Columbia Art Center through June 2. "I want to show that seemingly menial female work can be a source of pleasure and power for women," says Chin, 42. She says it...
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Frank, the driver, dropped off the trash bin early yesterday morning and left. And Eric Hoel - the only other guy on the job - stayed to supervise the recovery of the wood trim that a dozen volunteers stripped from a Waverly rowhouse's interior as part of the Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity home rehabilitation project. But his duties stopped there. This is the house that Jack didn't build. Laura did. And Lisa and Missy, MaryAnn and JoAnn, Terry and Dayle, and the rest of the 12-member female construction crew assisted her by taking sledgehammers to plaster walls and crowbars to baseboards to renovate the 1920s brick house and prepare it for a new owner.
NEWS
By Rosalie Osias | April 5, 1998
TWO DECADES have passed since Bella Abzug emerged as a fiery champion of women's rights. Now, it's time for a new feminist movement - one that tells women how to set goals and how to achieve them within the reality of a male-dominated world.As the president of a not-for-profit foundation dedicated to recognizing the realities of the workplace, it is my hope that the next century allows women to use weapons still effective in the age-old battle between the sexes. The symbol for our new revolution?
NEWS
August 21, 1996
THE TIME when women's work was in the home is long past in this country, and the same trend holds true around the world.According to a new report from the International Labor Organization, by the year 2000, women will participate in the labor force in about the same percentage as men in many industrialized countries.In developing countries, where few women have the luxury of leisure, female workers will make up about one-third of the formal labor force by then.Considering their household responsibilities, women in most countries work longer hours.
NEWS
May 2, 1995
Men may work from dusk to dawn, but women's work is never done. Remember that old nursery rhyme? Growing up prior to the women's liberation movement, you knew exactly what "women's work" meant. Today, there's really no such thing.A recent study of census data by the Program for Applied Research at Queens College shows women have dramatically increased their percentage of jobs traditionally held by men. But there has been no similarly large movement of men to take jobs traditionally held by women.
FEATURES
By Karla A. Henderson and Karla A. Henderson,Special to The Sun | July 17, 1994
"Man may work from sun to sun, but woman's work is never done."This old rhyme holds as much truth today as in the past.With the opportunities and technology available in the 1990s, many women believe they should have more time for themselves. They expect their lives to be dramatically different from that of their grandmothers. Unfortunately, change has been slow.Women face many of the same time constraints as men. For many women, however, time management is a growing concern.But this is nothing new. Challenges in balancing work, family and personal interests historically have been a problem.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | January 18, 1992
Cleopatra fell for Marc Anthony, but her real passion was roses: She covered the floor of her banquet hall with roses to a depth of nearly 2 feet.Tropical plants intrigued the late Margaret Mee, a botanist who spent much of her life in the Amazon, painting endangered flora and living on packets of dried soup boiled in swamp water.Dahlias won the heart of the Empress Josephine, who spent 3,000 francs for a single tuber for her famous French garden."Josephine collected plants like her husband Napoleon conquered countries," says Jennifer Bennett in her book, "Lilies of the Hearth," a study of the historical relationship between women and plants.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | February 9, 1993
Backache? Bleary eyes? Sore shoulders and wrists? Chances are your workplace doesn't accommodate your physical characteristics, since a woman's dimensions are different from a man's. While that's obvious, it is rarely taken into account when planning work environments.Ergonomics is the science of fitting work tasks to the people who do them. Women are a major portion of the work force, and designing space for them is a new area of study. Ergonomists know that when the work space doesn't fit the individual, the health consequences can range from fatigue to more severe diseases and injuries related to continuous overuse of muscles and joints.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | December 28, 1992
Nicky Marone is angry. She's tired of the problems women face in the workplace merely because they're women.Issues such as unequal pay, lack of child care and constantly being passed over for promotion have driven her up -- and over -- the wall.That's why the human-relations consultant from Boulder, Colo., is calling for a national strike of women who work in the home, outside it or both.She is gathering details and support to stage a National Women's Strike Day on Oct. 14.The last such strike in the United States was Aug. 26, 1970, the anniversary of the day women received the right to vote.
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