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By Christian Ewell and Milton Kent and Christian Ewell and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- In addition to extending its overall streak to 45 games, Tennessee's 93-75 win over Louisiana Tech for the national title last night was its 18th in a row in the NCAA tournament.The Lady Vols' last tournament loss was to Connecticut, 70-64, in the 1995 title game.For Louisiana Tech, last night's loss ended a 16-game winning streak. The team last lost Jan. 25 against Western Kentucky, 88-86.Look for Tennessee to be dominant again next season. Assuming that Chamique Holdsclaw makes good on her pledge to return for her senior season, the only player lost will be Laurie Milligan.
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SPORTS
March 27, 2008
How about 10 p.m. tip-offs for the NCAA women's basketball tournament? That's OK if the game is in California or Washington. But in Maryland? Give us a break. If anyone even has the slightest notion that the NCAA isn't just a big business, the TV contract for the women's tournament should put that idea to rest. Not only did many people miss the game on TV because of the late hour, but we're sure the attendance at Comcast Center was affected. We deserved better. The Maryland and Nebraska women players deserved better.
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SPORTS
By Bill Free | March 4, 2004
MAAC women's tournament What: Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference women's tournament Site: Pepsi Arena, Albany, N.Y. When: Today through Sunday 2003 champion: Manhattan 2004 favorite: Siena. The top-seeded Saints (17-10, 13-5 MAAC) are the hottest team in the league with six straight wins, even though they've been playing without their best player, 6-foot-2 senior center Liene Jansone, who has been out with a broken wrist since Jan. 30. More importantly, Siena draws two byes as the top seed and needs to win just two games to capture the tournament title.
SPORTS
By MECHELLE VOEPEL and MECHELLE VOEPEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | April 7, 2006
BOSTON -- The WNBA draft came soon after the NCAA women's championship game -- a little too soon, perhaps, for three Duke players still agonizing over their 78-75 overtime loss to Maryland on Tuesday. Wednesday afternoon, Duke's Monique Currie went No. 3 in the draft, while teammates Mistie Williams (second round) and Jessica Foley (third round) were selected, too. Three other first-round picks were from teams that also felt the sting of Final Four defeat: No. 1 selection Seimone Augustus of LSU, No. 9 La'Tangela Atkinson of North Carolina and No. 14 Scholanda Hoston of LSU. Also taken among the 14 players in the first round were four whose seasons ended in the Elite Eight and three who made it as far as the Sweet 16. And what college team was totally absent from the draft?
SPORTS
By MECHELLE VOEPEL and MECHELLE VOEPEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | April 7, 2006
BOSTON -- The WNBA draft came soon after the NCAA women's championship game -- a little too soon, perhaps, for three Duke players still agonizing over their 78-75 overtime loss to Maryland on Tuesday. Wednesday afternoon, Duke's Monique Currie went No. 3 in the draft, while teammates Mistie Williams (second round) and Jessica Foley (third round) were selected, too. Three other first-round picks were from teams that also felt the sting of Final Four defeat: No. 1 selection Seimone Augustus of LSU, No. 9 La'Tangela Atkinson of North Carolina and No. 14 Scholanda Hoston of LSU. Also taken among the 14 players in the first round were four whose seasons ended in the Elite Eight and three who made it as far as the Sweet 16. And what college team was totally absent from the draft?
SPORTS
March 27, 2008
How about 10 p.m. tip-offs for the NCAA women's basketball tournament? That's OK if the game is in California or Washington. But in Maryland? Give us a break. If anyone even has the slightest notion that the NCAA isn't just a big business, the TV contract for the women's tournament should put that idea to rest. Not only did many people miss the game on TV because of the late hour, but we're sure the attendance at Comcast Center was affected. We deserved better. The Maryland and Nebraska women players deserved better.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
They call this an American tournament, but you'd never know it judging by the hometowns of most of the players.The T. Rowe Price National Intercollegiate Clay Court Championships unfolding this week at the Suburban Club are peppered with foreign players from American colleges.Only seven of the 28 men who earned automatic berths in the main draw are Americans. In the nine-year history of the tournament, no American male has ever won the singles title.It is a similar story on the women's side -- only eight of the 28 are Americans.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
ATLANTA -- Nancy Lieberman-Cline, one of the legends of women's basketball in her days at Old Dominion in the late 1970s, called yesterday's national championship game between Texas Tech and Ohio State for the NCAA Radio Network.She saw history, as Texas Tech's Sheryl Swoopes scored 47 points -- a championship-game record for men or women -- to lead the Red Raiders over the Buckeyes, 84-82.Lieberman-Cline praised the 6-foot senior."She's an unbelievable player. She's just taken the history of the game to the next level," said Lieberman-Cline.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
The quest to get women's basketball out of the shadows of the men's game never seems to end, and one of the latest attempts centers on the possibility of moving the women's tournament out of direct competition with the more popular men's event.Judy Holland, chairwoman of the NCAA Division I women's basketball committee, said the NCAA and the Women's Basketball Coaches Association are in the preliminary stages of moving the tournament to February so it will not conflict with the men's tournament.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
By moving the NCAA Division I national championships to Memorial Day weekend in 2006, officials hope to ease the burden on participating teams and rev up attendance. Kathy Zerrlaut, chair of the Division I women's lacrosse championship committee and senior associate athletic director at UMBC, said the committee has been talking about making the move for years. The women's final four has been held the weekend before Memorial Day, while the men's tournament culminates over the holiday weekend.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | March 30, 2006
College Park -- All season, Brenda Frese has preached to her Maryland women's basketball team the necessity of living in the present and seizing the moment. And for now, the Terps can lay claim to being one of the four best teams in the country after securing a spot in the NCAA tournament Final Four in Boston. It has been a humbling and awe-inspiring journey for Maryland, which was eight games under .500 in Frese's first season as coach in 2002-03. "You can obviously look back to four years ago when we were 10-18 and, holy cow, now we're going to the Final Four," she said moments after the second-seeded Terps defeated fifth-seeded Utah, 75-65, in overtime in the Albuquerque Regional final Monday night.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
By moving the NCAA Division I national championships to Memorial Day weekend in 2006, officials hope to ease the burden on participating teams and rev up attendance. Kathy Zerrlaut, chair of the Division I women's lacrosse championship committee and senior associate athletic director at UMBC, said the committee has been talking about making the move for years. The women's final four has been held the weekend before Memorial Day, while the men's tournament culminates over the holiday weekend.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | March 4, 2004
MAAC women's tournament What: Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference women's tournament Site: Pepsi Arena, Albany, N.Y. When: Today through Sunday 2003 champion: Manhattan 2004 favorite: Siena. The top-seeded Saints (17-10, 13-5 MAAC) are the hottest team in the league with six straight wins, even though they've been playing without their best player, 6-foot-2 senior center Liene Jansone, who has been out with a broken wrist since Jan. 30. More importantly, Siena draws two byes as the top seed and needs to win just two games to capture the tournament title.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2001
In real terms, Gampel Pavilion on the University of Connecticut's campus in Storrs, is only 11 years old, hardly old enough to qualify for shrine status. But, in women's basketball circles, Gampel, the 10,000-seat home of the defending champion and top-ranked Huskies and 47 straight regular-season sellouts, is sacred territory, and its aura may be powerful enough to have an effect on tonight's Maryland-Colorado State NCAA tournament game. "I've been to the gym. I know how the crowd is. It's a great atmosphere to play in. I'm very excited," said Maryland guard Marche Strickland, a native of Kingston, Mass.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Milton Kent and Christian Ewell and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- In addition to extending its overall streak to 45 games, Tennessee's 93-75 win over Louisiana Tech for the national title last night was its 18th in a row in the NCAA tournament.The Lady Vols' last tournament loss was to Connecticut, 70-64, in the 1995 title game.For Louisiana Tech, last night's loss ended a 16-game winning streak. The team last lost Jan. 25 against Western Kentucky, 88-86.Look for Tennessee to be dominant again next season. Assuming that Chamique Holdsclaw makes good on her pledge to return for her senior season, the only player lost will be Laurie Milligan.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | March 10, 1998
Today, with apologies to David Letterman for stealing his bit with hardly any of the comic value, Media Watch's "NCAA Tournament Hopes and Fears."Hope: That CBS, now that it has entered the modern era and has put the score and clock on screen at virtually all times, will stay with the concept.Fear: That Duke won't lose early enough for its coach, Mike Krzyzewski, to replace Dean Smith in the CBS studio. Smith, the former North Carolina coach, looked rather, well, uncomfortable last weekend, and three more weekends of that will be deadly viewing.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
As the 11th NCAA women's basketball tournament begins with first-round games around the country tonight, the sport appears to be suffering from growing pains.The interest level has never been higher, as evidenced by increased television ratings and the more than 14,500 people who packed Cole Field House to see Maryland and Virginia play last month.In addition, sentiment appears to be rising to increase the tournament field from its current 48 teams to 56 or 64 to accommodate the growing number of quality teams.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2001
In real terms, Gampel Pavilion on the University of Connecticut's campus in Storrs, is only 11 years old, hardly old enough to qualify for shrine status. But, in women's basketball circles, Gampel, the 10,000-seat home of the defending champion and top-ranked Huskies and 47 straight regular-season sellouts, is sacred territory, and its aura may be powerful enough to have an effect on tonight's Maryland-Colorado State NCAA tournament game. "I've been to the gym. I know how the crowd is. It's a great atmosphere to play in. I'm very excited," said Maryland guard Marche Strickland, a native of Kingston, Mass.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
They call this an American tournament, but you'd never know it judging by the hometowns of most of the players.The T. Rowe Price National Intercollegiate Clay Court Championships unfolding this week at the Suburban Club are peppered with foreign players from American colleges.Only seven of the 28 men who earned automatic berths in the main draw are Americans. In the nine-year history of the tournament, no American male has ever won the singles title.It is a similar story on the women's side -- only eight of the 28 are Americans.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | December 8, 1994
As expected, ESPN and the NCAA announced a potential seven-year agreement for the network and its companion channel, ESPN2, to carry the women's basketball tournament and 18 other collegiate championships, including the men's lacrosse final, for up to seven years, starting with the 1995-96 academic year.As part of the $19 million contract -- which runs for three years and includes four option years -- ESPN and ESPN2 will become the exclusive home of the women's tournament, carrying selected first- and second-round contests, all eight regional semifinals, the four regional finals and all three games of the Final Four.
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