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By Alice Steinbach | December 16, 1990
The feminist scholar begins the interview with one of her most valued recipes: the recipe for a successful marriage. She starts with a list of ingredients."
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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | May 20, 2009
In 1955, Shirley Smith's parents quashed her goal of becoming a teacher. Higher education, they told her, was a waste of her time and their money, the purview of men. Smith obeyed, but only temporarily. More than a half-century later, at age 72, she will receive her degree from Towson University this week after completing course work in women's studies - a field that didn't even exist when her parents discouraged her from pursuing college. A petite, energetic woman with a big laugh, she's not the oldest to receive a degree from the state's second-largest university; but with a lifetime of experience, three children and four grandchildren, she's not your typical collegian, either.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1994
This time, it's playing out on ice, at the Olympics and before the increasingly tabloid-blurred eyes of the world. But strip away the sequins and the triple toe loops, and what you have is a variation on one of the oldest and most enduring themes in the world: the catfight.As Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan warily continue their joint practices before the women's figure skating competition begins on Wednesday, it might seem as if you've seen this drama before. And you have: In movies and television, in soap operas and perhaps even in your own workplace, the scenario -- real or perceived -- of a woman conniving and back-stabbing to one-up a rival is a familiar one.And it's one that turns us into rubberneckers: We simply can't stop watching, regardless of how unseemly it gets.
NEWS
December 9, 2008
ELIZABETH W. FERNEA, 81 Mideast scholar Elizabeth Warnock Fernea, a scholar of women's studies in the Middle East who delved into the subject as a newlywed in 1956 in Iraq and whose memoir about the experience, Guests of the Sheik, was the first of several of her works that examined the role of women in the region, died Dec. 2 at a daughter's home in La Canada Flintridge, Calif., after a long illness, her family said. Ms. Fernea, was a professor emeritus of comparative literature and Middle Eastern studies at the University of Texas, Austin.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Elaine Hedges, the founder and coordinator of the Women's Studies program at Towson State University and an English professor for more than 20 years, died of undetermined causes June 5 at Sinai Hospital. She was 69 and lived in Roland Park.Dr. Hedges, who retired last year, was nationally known as an authority on women's history and women's studies. She wrote or edited 12 books and wrote scores of articles related to women. Her writings were used in college classrooms nationwide."She was a truly profound and reputable scholar in a field that was criticized about not being serious about real scholarship," said Clarinda Harris, a longtime friend who chairs the English Department at Towson State.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 1993
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- The University of Virginia faculty rejected yesterday a proposal that would have barred romance between professors and undergraduates, instead voting to ban relationships only between teachers and the students they supervise.The proposed ban, which must be approved by the university president, Dr. John T. Casteen III, would forbid professors and graduate teaching assistants from amorous or sexual relationships or overtures involving students whom they teach, coach or evaluate or to whom they allocate money.
NEWS
March 31, 2002
Taxpayers group to hold meeting about tax rights Carroll County Taxpayers Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Westminster Senior Center. Residents can learn about their rights and procedures to fight high property tax increases. The senior center is at 125 Stoner Ave. Information: 410-840-9699. Professor to discuss Islam and male authority A retired Pakistani professor will discuss "Women, Islam and Male Authority" at 7 p.m. Thursday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 1993
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- The University of Virginia faculty has rejected a proposal that would have barred romance between professors and undergraduates, and instead voted to ban relationships only between professors and the students they supervise.The proposed ban, which must be approved by the university president, Dr. John T. Casteen III, would forbid professors and graduate teaching assistants from amorous or sexual relationships or overtures involving students whom they teach, coach, evaluate or to whom they allocate money.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 31, 1990
One year after crowds swept through the streets of Eastern Europe toppling communist dictators with demands for more freedom, the region's women have found democracy a less than liberating experience."
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
A peace train rolled into Baltimore yesterday, carrying a message to the next generation.About 14 members of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) were greeted at Penn Station with songs of peace before journeying to Goucher College in Towson to meet with more than 50 high school and college students."It gives us a chance to talk to people. It's been just incredible," said Jean Gore, national WILPF president who has been traveling with the group since Nov. 1. The 11-city East Coast trip, designed to spread the group's message about peace, concludes Nov. 15 in Atlanta.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 22, 2006
Slugging it out on the weird-story front The Associated Press, looking for a snappy two-word name for the story, first came up with "Doctorate Madam." Hours later, after a reporter realized the Ph.D. in question was charged with being a prostitute, not a madam, that was subbed out for "Scholarly Prostitute." More accurate, but somewhere out there, there must be a better slug (newspaperese for the mini-headline) for a story this weird. Cul-De-Sac Call Girl? The accused, Brandy Britton, lives on a quiet street in Ellicott City, in a so-so suburban brown-on-beige number that's not the typical house of ill repute.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
Severn School OKs new head of school The board of the 92-year-old Severn School last month approved the appointment of Douglas Lagarde to succeed William Creeden as head of school starting July 1. Lagarde has worked for 14 years at the University School in Hunting Valley, Ohio, where he has been associate headmaster. He was a math teacher and later head of the upper school and assistant director of guidance. Previously, he was a teacher and coach at Landon School in Bethesda. Lagarde has a master's degree in education from Harvard University and an undergraduate degree in economics from the College of William & Mary.
NEWS
March 31, 2002
Taxpayers group to hold meeting about tax rights Carroll County Taxpayers Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Westminster Senior Center. Residents can learn about their rights and procedures to fight high property tax increases. The senior center is at 125 Stoner Ave. Information: 410-840-9699. Professor to discuss Islam and male authority A retired Pakistani professor will discuss "Women, Islam and Male Authority" at 7 p.m. Thursday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
"My name is Robyn Forster, and I'm a nerd," announced the 20-year-old sociology major. And she wasn't alone. The classroom at University of Maryland, Baltimore County took on the feel of a Nerds Anonymous meeting as the 17 women and one man enrolled in "Cybergrrls and Wired Women" laid bare their love affairs with the computer. Professor Sandra Shattuck, associate director of the university's Center for Women and Information Technology, beamed. "I thought the rallying around nerddom was great," said Shattuck, who came to UMBC a year ago to help the center draw women into the high-tech world.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 1, 2000
ELEANOR SMEAL, a name forever linked with feminism for those of us old enough to remember the movement's infancy, will be at Goucher College Thursday evening on a recruiting trip. This is something like her 48th visit to a college campus since October, and her field organization has spawned feminist cells on 87 campuses. At least that many more have signed up over the Internet. Smeal is no longer the president of the National Organization for Women, but she was so identified with NOW in the 1970s and '80s that many women from that era may think she still is. For more than 12 years, though, she's headed the Feminist Majority, a women's rights group that is part think-tank, part activist organization.
NEWS
September 11, 1999
Feminism is diverse and has improved many women's livesI couldn't agree more with the headline of Cathy Young's column, "When teaching feminism, preach inclusiveness" (Opinion Commentary, Aug. 30). However, Ms. Young presents a distorted view of feminism.She discusses Mary Daly, a scholar and theorist at Boston College who refused to teach male students, as though there was no debate among feminists about Ms. Daly's stand.This is simply not true, as Ms. Young could have easily discovered.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | January 20, 1994
WHEN YOU don't want to write about something as badly as I don't want to write about the Bobbitt case, it's nature's way of telling you to figure out why.Too easy to say that there's nothing more to say. Not good enough to note that the case of the woman who cut off her husband's penis has evoked more bad double entendres than anything in recent memory.No, none of that is why I've avoided the Bobbitts. It's because of feminism. It's because, three decades after the movement for women's equality began, the Bobbitt case is what naysayers truly believe it is all about: cutting it off.But never fear, gentlemen; castration was really not the point of feminism, and we women are too busy eviscerating one another to take you on.Witness an article in Esquire magazine about a group of young women characterized as "do me feminists" because of an agenda heavy on sex when and how they want it, with no guilt, no regrets.
NEWS
January 15, 1999
William Bentley Ball, 83, a nationally known lawyer who championed religious freedom and won a case that helped preserve the Amish way of life, died Sunday in Harrisburg, Pa. His best-known case was Wisconsin vs. Yoder, in which state officials sought to force Amish children to attend public schools until age 16. The early 1970s case set a standard under which the government was required to show a compelling public need behind policies affecting religious groups.Dr....
NEWS
January 15, 1999
William Bentley Ball, 83, a nationally known lawyer who championed religious freedom and won a case that helped preserve the Amish way of life, died Sunday in Harrisburg, Pa. His best-known case was Wisconsin vs. Yoder, in which state officials sought to force Amish children to attend public schools until age 16. The early 1970s case set a standard under which the government was required to show a compelling public need behind policies affecting religious groups.Dr....
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