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By Carol Mason | February 18, 2004
A PROMINENT African-American woman bares her breast before a pulsing audience. The media go wild, and fallout from the act reverberates for years. But the year is 1858, not 2004, and the woman is Sojourner Truth. Sadly, the comparison between Ms. Truth and a modern Janet Jackson ends almost before it begins. A slave from her birth around 1799 to her emancipation in 1827, Sojourner Truth inspired black and white audiences as a preacher, a prominent abolitionist and a fervent supporter of women's rights.
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NEWS
By Sheri L. Parks | April 26, 2010
Dorothy Height, the grande dame of the civil rights movement, died recently in Washington after a long illness. She was 98. Mrs. Height, as everyone called her, was a force in the black civil rights movement for 60 years, 40 of them as the president of National Council of Negro Women. In life and in death, she has been called the matriarch and the queen of the movement. President Barack Obama called her its "godmother." The titles are reverential. She was a tall, stately woman, always perfectly dressed, her voice moderated and mannered.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court set the stage yesterday for a major ruling on Congress' power to pass new civil rights laws and, in particular, to protect women against sexual violence by allowing them to sue their attackers.Taking on new cases for decision in the term that formally opens Monday, the court said it will rule on the constitutionality of the Violence Against Women Act, passed by Congress five years ago.A federal appeals court struck down the key part of that law in March, saying Congress had intruded on states' authority to deal with domestic violence.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 3, 2010
BOSTON - - There is something fitting about writing my last column just as the new year begins. January, after all, is named for the Roman god of beginnings and endings. He looked backward and forward at the same time. So, this morning, do I. I wish I could find the right language to describe this rite of passage. Retirement, that swoon of a word, just won't do. The Spanish translation, jubilacion, is a bit over the top for my own mix of feelings. The phrase that kept running through my head as I considered this next step was: "I'm letting myself go."
NEWS
August 1, 2006
Kurt Kreuger, 89, a German-born actor who reluctantly played Nazi soldiers in many films about World War II, died of a stroke July 12 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Mr. Kreuger played German soldiers and Nazi officers in movies including Hotel Berlin, Paris Underground and Sahara, a 1943 movie starring Humphrey Bogart that was nominated for three Academy Awards. After the war, he continued to play German soldiers and other movie villains. He often felt typecast and encountered resistance from studio executives when he asked to play other types of characters, said a friend, Lynne Riehman.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 7, 2002
The U.S. government is closer to Sudan than it is to the United Kingdom as far as its international recognition of women's rights - at least according to the United Nations. For 23 years, the United States has not ratified a U.N. treaty that seeks to establish protection for women's rights and to promote gender equality. In not signing the treaty, the United States joins the ranks of Sudan, Afghanistan, Egypt and Iraq. More than 169 nations, including Saudi Arabia and Iran, have approved the Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
For more than two decades, Fahima Vorgetts has dreamed of going home. But now, as the Annapolis business owner prepares for her first trip back to Afghanistan since she fled the war-torn country in 1979, she braces for the worst. "I have been warned that the country is so devastated, and most of the people I knew are gone or killed," she says. "I have been told that I will be heartbroken, and I am prepared for that." Vorgetts, 47, leaves today for a five-week trip that will take her into the midst of the suffering people of her homeland.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
Fahima Vorgetts dreams of Afghanistan. Nearly every night, her sleeping mind is flooded with visions and memories of the land she fled more than two decades ago. The Annapolis shopkeeper, 45, sees the faces of friends and relatives she left behind, and relives pleasant afternoon picnics in a lush valley north of the capital, Kabul. During the day, her mind is filled with the nightmare of life in Afghanistan today, where her mother, sisters, aunts have seen their liberty curtailed and their lives ripped apart under the strict rule of the Taliban government.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court begins a new term Monday, with federal civil rights laws likely to collide repeatedly with the majority justices' hardening views against wide-ranging laws passed by Congress.For eight terms -- the entire time that the present majority of five conservative justices has served together -- those five have combined to cast doubt on or strike down broad federal statutes.But, with one exception, the laws that have fallen or become sharply narrowed were not designed to protect civil rights.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg strongly urged Congress yesterday to add an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution but gave no clear sign that she would try to get the court to create new women's rights if there is no ERA.Spending much of her time on her second day before the Senate Judiciary Committee answering questions about discrimination against women, the judge and former pioneering women's rights lawyer repeatedly recited...
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | December 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Saudi King Abdullah's pardon of the "Qatif girl" - who was gang-raped and then sentenced to 200 lashes and six months imprisonment for "improper mingling" - is welcome news. With something less than gratitude, Westerners are nonetheless relieved. It seems obvious that the king's decision was influenced in part by pressures both from the international community, including the United States, and within Saudi Arabia, where some writers and others bravely expressed outrage and embarrassment.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 18, 2007
BOSTON -- I don't doubt Oprah Winfrey's marketing magic, although we don't know yet whether she can do for politics what she's done for publishing. Her endorsement of the candidate Barack Obama may not be as successful as it was for the author Barack Obama. But ever since she gave a nod to the Illinois senator on the Larry King show, Oprah has brought some extra attention to a familiar and not always welcome question. Are African-American women, a large and loyal subset of the Democratic Party, going to be torn between two firsts?
NEWS
August 1, 2006
Kurt Kreuger, 89, a German-born actor who reluctantly played Nazi soldiers in many films about World War II, died of a stroke July 12 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Mr. Kreuger played German soldiers and Nazi officers in movies including Hotel Berlin, Paris Underground and Sahara, a 1943 movie starring Humphrey Bogart that was nominated for three Academy Awards. After the war, he continued to play German soldiers and other movie villains. He often felt typecast and encountered resistance from studio executives when he asked to play other types of characters, said a friend, Lynne Riehman.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 6, 2006
BOSTON -- There are times when political polling reminds me of one of Liz Carpenter's favorite stories. Back in the Carter administration when the indomitable Texan was working on women's rights, she asked a university president how his campus was broken down by sex. "Well, ma'am," he answered thoughtfully, "liquor is more of a problem." Over the years, sexual breakdowns became a regular feature in the polling firmament. The gender gap was discovered and then elevated to a truism, and finally divided into various subsets of the gene pool.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - For many of the activists who have dedicated themselves to the battle over the U.S. Supreme Court, abortion rights is the issue that unites them. Yesterday, they got a chance to hear Judge John G. Roberts Jr. speak at length - and repeatedly - about the issue. But they didn't necessarily come away satisfied. Supporters of abortion rights were frustrated that Roberts did not talk in greater detail about his thoughts on Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 case affirming abortion rights, and another seminal case, 1992's Casey v. Planned Parenthood of Pennsylvania, which revised the Roe decision but affirmed its core.
NEWS
By Naftali Bendavid and Jan C. Greenburg and Naftali Bendavid and Jan C. Greenburg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - While serving in the Reagan White House, Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. was skeptical of some state proposals for solving "perceived problems of gender discrimination," calling these initiatives to promote women's rights "highly objectionable," according to documents released yesterday. With the Bush administration releasing yesterday the latest batch of documents from Roberts' government service, about 38,000 pages, the issue of women's rights is emerging as one that might cause Roberts some difficulty, critics say. In the documents, Roberts directed much of his criticism at the controversial notion of "comparable worth," which aimed to ensure that women receive pay similar to that of men if they work in different jobs of similar worth to society.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a sweeping new declaration of sex equality that was mainly a gain for women's rights, the Supreme Court ruled 6-3 yesterday that it is unconstitutional for prosecutors to use individuals' sex as the reason for denying them a seat on a jury.The ruling, the first by the court in a dozen years on women's rights under the Constitution, said that selecting jurors on the basis of their sex is a form of discrimination that "serves to ratify and perpetuate . . . archaic and overbroad stereotypes about the relative abilities of men and women."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - With women's rights advocates calling on President Bush to ensure that any new government in Afghanistan restores and guarantees the rights of women, the White House is embarking on a new offensive to highlight the repressive treatment of women by the crumbling Taliban regime. In remarks to schoolchildren in Crawford, Texas, yesterday, Bush spoke of his "keen desire to free the women of Afghanistan" and called the Taliban "the most repressive, backward group of people we have seen on the face of the Earth in a long period of time, including and particularly how they treat women."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 13, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's lackluster presidential election season erupted in violence yesterday, with five bombs killing at least seven people and Iranian police beating and arresting protesters at a women's rights demonstration in Tehran. Four bombs exploded about 11 a.m. in the southwestern city of Ahvaz, killing at least six people and wounding 70, the provincial governor told state-run Iranian television. Iranian journalists based in Ahvaz put the figure at eight dead and 80 wounded. The fifth blast occurred in Tehran about 9 p.m., killing one person and wounding four, according to state-run television and eyewitness accounts.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - As the democracy debate intensifies in the Middle East, many Arab women are asking whether democratic elections mean that their freedom will be curtailed. If this concern seems strange, consider Salama al-Khafaji, a courageous dental surgeon who risked her life to run in Iraqi elections. Her 17-year-old son was shot dead in 2003 during an attempt by insurgents to kill her, but she continued her work as a member of Iraq's first interim governing council. A motorcyclist toting a machine gun nearly assassinated her during the election run-up in January.
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