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By Cox News Service | December 16, 1994
Women feel less qualified than men to run for office, and that is one of the main reasons they are far less likely to become candidates, according to a new survey released yesterday."
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | December 27, 1994
Boston -- As a journalist, I have long been a connoisseur of corrections. I am drawn to the little boxes in the corner of the newspaper to see what errors of omission and commission were committed by some writer or editor.Public apologies are so few and far between. The art of begging pardon has become an endangered species of speech. Having a lawyer means never being able to say you're sorry. Politicians and CEOs offer only their most choked regrets: ''If I may have inadvertently said or done something that you may have misconstrued as something that offended you, . . .'' Companies pay enormous settlements to clients, employees and customers as long as they don't have to admit guilt.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Should you stroll through the corridors of power and wander into the offices that house our senators and representatives, you would be greeted the same way by the receptionists in each one: With a smile.A pleasant disposition is considered a prerequisite for dealing with the public on Capitol Hill.But behind the smiles there is pain.According to a survey conducted by the Washington Post in January, more than one out of every three women working on Capitol Hill say they have been sexually harassed on the job. And one third of these women say the harasser has been a senator or congressman.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | December 16, 1994
Women feel less qualified than men to run for office, and that is one of the main reasons they are far less likely to become candidates, according to a new survey released yesterday."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 10, 1992
Boston.--A Week before the election, one of the funnier and mouthier young women in my family sent me a copy of a Toys R Us ad. There, in living color, was the candidate of toymakers' dreams: ''Barbie for President.''This doll of a candidate was dressed for her Inaugural Prom in star-spangled tulle. Though she was born in the 1950s, Barbie still didn't look old enough to pass the constitutional age test. Furthermore, she wasn't running for president, she was posing for president.The letter that came with this ad asked wryly if this was the change that my generation of women had labored so long and mightily to produce for the next.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | December 27, 1994
Boston -- As a journalist, I have long been a connoisseur of corrections. I am drawn to the little boxes in the corner of the newspaper to see what errors of omission and commission were committed by some writer or editor.Public apologies are so few and far between. The art of begging pardon has become an endangered species of speech. Having a lawyer means never being able to say you're sorry. Politicians and CEOs offer only their most choked regrets: ''If I may have inadvertently said or done something that you may have misconstrued as something that offended you, . . .'' Companies pay enormous settlements to clients, employees and customers as long as they don't have to admit guilt.
NEWS
By Katherine Shaver and Derek Lick and Katherine Shaver and Derek Lick,States News Service | October 29, 1991
Contrary to a story in yesterday's Evening Sun, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., has signed guidelines proposed by the Capitol Hill Women's Political Caucus against sexual harassment. The Evening Sun regrets the error.Anita Hill's allegation of sexual harassment didn't keep Judge Clarence Thomas off the U.S. Supreme Court, but it certainly sent senators and House members, including some from Maryland, scurrying.Some members of Congress suddenly are sending out news releases outlining their individual office's sexual harassment policies.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
James Riley, a Republican candidate for the House of Delegates in District 31, claimed in a recent newspaper advertisement with the headline "Stand By Your Man" that he was endorsed by the Maryland Women's Political Caucus.But the women of the caucus insist that they are not standing by Mr. Riley -- at least not as strongly as he claimed.Grace Orlansky, co-chair of the caucus, said the "highly satisfactory" rating Mr. Riley received from the organization based on a survey he completed was not an endorsement.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In the wake of major victories for women in last year's congressional races, the stakes and opportunities for female candidates will be even higher in the 1994 elections for governors, according to Harriett Woods, president of the National Women's Political Caucus."
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | September 26, 1994
A NEW STUDY of women's chances of winning elections debunks the conventional wisdom that women have a harder time than men do.It is not a candidate's sex that is the determining factor, the study found; it is incumbency that offers a critical difference.That's not surprising. Incumbents' races usually are better financed by special-interest money from political action committees with a stake in the incumbents' voting records.The money, in turn, with the help of name recognition, helps incumbents finance slick advertising campaigns that many populist and underfinanced challengers, female or male, simply can't afford.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | September 26, 1994
A NEW STUDY of women's chances of winning elections debunks the conventional wisdom that women have a harder time than men do.It is not a candidate's sex that is the determining factor, the study found; it is incumbency that offers a critical difference.That's not surprising. Incumbents' races usually are better financed by special-interest money from political action committees with a stake in the incumbents' voting records.The money, in turn, with the help of name recognition, helps incumbents finance slick advertising campaigns that many populist and underfinanced challengers, female or male, simply can't afford.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
James Riley, a Republican candidate for the House of Delegates in District 31, claimed in a recent newspaper advertisement with the headline "Stand By Your Man" that he was endorsed by the Maryland Women's Political Caucus.But the women of the caucus insist that they are not standing by Mr. Riley -- at least not as strongly as he claimed.Grace Orlansky, co-chair of the caucus, said the "highly satisfactory" rating Mr. Riley received from the organization based on a survey he completed was not an endorsement.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Should you stroll through the corridors of power and wander into the offices that house our senators and representatives, you would be greeted the same way by the receptionists in each one: With a smile.A pleasant disposition is considered a prerequisite for dealing with the public on Capitol Hill.But behind the smiles there is pain.According to a survey conducted by the Washington Post in January, more than one out of every three women working on Capitol Hill say they have been sexually harassed on the job. And one third of these women say the harasser has been a senator or congressman.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In the wake of major victories for women in last year's congressional races, the stakes and opportunities for female candidates will be even higher in the 1994 elections for governors, according to Harriett Woods, president of the National Women's Political Caucus."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 10, 1992
Boston.--A Week before the election, one of the funnier and mouthier young women in my family sent me a copy of a Toys R Us ad. There, in living color, was the candidate of toymakers' dreams: ''Barbie for President.''This doll of a candidate was dressed for her Inaugural Prom in star-spangled tulle. Though she was born in the 1950s, Barbie still didn't look old enough to pass the constitutional age test. Furthermore, she wasn't running for president, she was posing for president.The letter that came with this ad asked wryly if this was the change that my generation of women had labored so long and mightily to produce for the next.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 5, 1991
Boston -- And now as we make our daily rounds, we pause for a moment to check the pulse of public life for signs of Post-Thomas Stress Syndrome.Has the sexual shock that streaked through the body politic during the Thomas hearings worn off? Or are the aftereffects likely to continue?For a proper diagnosis, we put on our best bedside manner and approach the Congress first, where we find symptom one: Bi-Partisan All-Male Angst. This condition, a nervous tic in the presence of women voters, is apparent in both Republicans and Democrats, though Democrats are more likely to replay scenes of sheer incompetence in their heads and on their VCRs.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 5, 1991
Boston -- And now as we make our daily rounds, we pause for a moment to check the pulse of public life for signs of Post-Thomas Stress Syndrome.Has the sexual shock that streaked through the body politic during the Thomas hearings worn off? Or are the aftereffects likely to continue?For a proper diagnosis, we put on our best bedside manner and approach the Congress first, where we find symptom one: Bi-Partisan All-Male Angst. This condition, a nervous tic in the presence of women voters, is apparent in both Republicans and Democrats, though Democrats are more likely to replay scenes of sheer incompetence in their heads and on their VCRs.
NEWS
By Katherine Shaver and Derek Lick and Katherine Shaver and Derek Lick,States News Service | October 29, 1991
Contrary to a story in yesterday's Evening Sun, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., has signed guidelines proposed by the Capitol Hill Women's Political Caucus against sexual harassment. The Evening Sun regrets the error.Anita Hill's allegation of sexual harassment didn't keep Judge Clarence Thomas off the U.S. Supreme Court, but it certainly sent senators and House members, including some from Maryland, scurrying.Some members of Congress suddenly are sending out news releases outlining their individual office's sexual harassment policies.
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