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By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 1999
Susan Slaughter, teaching professional at Woodholme Country Club, is 2-for-2 in U.S. Women's Open qualifying attempts.Slaughter, 29, used the same strategy both times -- going to the site where most of the LPGA players were in the field. "I like to go where the best players are, because the better the competition, the better I play," she said recently.It was true last month, when she shot par 72 at The Legends Club in Franklin, Tenn., where 129 competed for 22 spots, to make it into the field for this week's championship at Old Waverly Golf Club in West Point, Miss.
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July 8, 2010
When the U.S. Women's Open last visited Oakmont Country Club in 1992, Patty Sheehan prevailed over Juli Inkster in a Monday playoff after matching four-day totals of 4-under par. No word whether the U.S. Golf Association was showing mercy. Oakmont and the USGA last tested the game's top men three years ago, when Angel Cabrera won at 5 over — and hardly anyone complained about a tricked-up layout. Judging from early reviews, this Women's Open will more resemble that affair than the 1992 version.
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SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Staff Writer | July 26, 1993
CARMEL, Ind. -- Tina Barrett joined the crowd of players who eagled the 435-yard ninth hole, and brought in a second successive sub-par round in the 48th U.S. Women's Open at Crooked Stick Golf Club yesterday.The Baltimorean finished at 1-under-par 71 and a 72-hole total of 287. This put her in a tie for 13th and ensured an exemption into next year's championship at Indianwood Country Club in Lake Orion, Mich.Former Owings Mills resident Sarah Ingram was second low amateur, tied for 58th overall, after posting 77-299.
SPORTS
August 11, 2006
Angela Stanford thought about playing a conservative shot from a tricky downhill lie in the 14th fairway. Instead, she talked herself into an aggressive play and ended up hitting the best shot of the best round of her life. Stanford deftly faded her 7-iron approach around a large greenside tree to set up a tap-in birdie, the last of her eight birdies in a bogey-free 64 yesterday that matched the lowest round in the history of the Canadian Women's Open in London, Ontario. "I think I've learned over the last couple of months when I start being conservative, and I don't just hit the shot that I'm feeling I should hit, that's when I get into trouble," said Stanford, three strokes ahead after the first round.
SPORTS
By STAFF REPORTS | July 21, 1997
AIKEN, S. C. -- Rebekah Owens of Columbia, S.C., played nearly flawless golf, building an early advantage and maintaining it the rest of the way as she defeated Jenny Chuasiriporn of Timonium, 6 and 5, in the championship match of the 67th Women's Trans National tournament at Hound- lake Country Club yesterday.Owens, who has one semester remaining at the University of South Carolina, was 4 up at the break, and 6 up after 27 holes. She made no mistakes and seemingly dropped every putt she had to in being around par for the 29 holes.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
WEST POINT, Miss. -- Nancy Lopez remembers the days when she was the LPGA's newest face and, in short time, its biggest star. Back then, playing against legends such as Mickey Wright and future Hall of Famers such as JoAnne Carner was a big deal to Lopez. It was a way to measure whether she had game.Today, as Jenny Chuasiriporn makes her professional debut in the 54th U.S. Women's Open at the Old Waverly Golf Club, the 21-year-old from Timonium will gauge herself against Lopez in much the same manner.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. - When Derek Tolan left his home outside Denver earlier this week, his friends at ThunderRidge High School had the typical request. "A lot of people asked me to get Tiger's autograph, Mickelson's, Duval's autograph," Tolan said yesterday. Tolan won't be your typical teen-ager here at Bethpage State Park for the 102nd U.S. Open. He won't be selling hot dogs. He won't be holding a portable scoreboard. He will be playing. At 16, Tolan is the youngest player in the field and one of the youngest ever to play in his country's national championship.
SPORTS
By MARK HERRMANN and MARK HERRMANN,NEWSDAY | July 3, 2006
NEWPORT, R.I. -- They are not as different as they might seem, Annika Sorenstam and Pat Hurst. Both are roughly the same age, both have had good lives in golf, both shot the same score in 36 holes of playing alongside each other yesterday to finish at even par and both would give anything to win the U.S. Women's Open playoff today. They will give everything they have, which, granted, involves a couple of different inventories: Today's 18-hole playoff 9 a.m., ESPN
SPORTS
By RANDALL MELL | July 4, 2006
NEWPORT, R.I. -- Move over, Babe and Tiger. Annika Sorenstam is moving alongside in the record books. After a grueling week of golf, Sorenstam made winning the 61st U.S. Women's Open look easy in yesterday's 18-hole playoff with Pat Hurst. Sorenstam claimed her 10th victory in a major championship, moving her into a tie for fourth on the LPGA list with Babe Zaharias. It also equals the number of majors won by Tiger Woods, who has teased his friend and Orlando, Fla., neighbor about trailing him. With a 1-under-par 70, Sorenstam defeated Hurst by four shots at Newport Country Club.
SPORTS
By Randall Mell and Randall Mell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2003
NORTH PLAINS, Ore. - Her father saw this coming when no one believed it possible, even his daughter. When Hilary Lunke rolled in a dramatic 15-foot birdie at the 18th hole to end yesterday's intensely waged three-way playoff, her father howled in the clubhouse. That's where Bill Homeyer escaped to after nine holes with the pressure mounting and Lunke fighting off charges from Angela Stanford and Kelly Robbins on Pumpkin Ridge's Witch Hollow Course. He watched one of the most dramatic conclusions in U.S. Women's Open history on television wondering if the tension could get any thicker when Stanford made a 24-foot birdie to tie Lunke for the lead at the final hole.
SPORTS
By RANDALL MELL | July 4, 2006
NEWPORT, R.I. -- Move over, Babe and Tiger. Annika Sorenstam is moving alongside in the record books. After a grueling week of golf, Sorenstam made winning the 61st U.S. Women's Open look easy in yesterday's 18-hole playoff with Pat Hurst. Sorenstam claimed her 10th victory in a major championship, moving her into a tie for fourth on the LPGA list with Babe Zaharias. It also equals the number of majors won by Tiger Woods, who has teased his friend and Orlando, Fla., neighbor about trailing him. With a 1-under-par 70, Sorenstam defeated Hurst by four shots at Newport Country Club.
SPORTS
By MARK HERRMANN and MARK HERRMANN,NEWSDAY | July 3, 2006
NEWPORT, R.I. -- They are not as different as they might seem, Annika Sorenstam and Pat Hurst. Both are roughly the same age, both have had good lives in golf, both shot the same score in 36 holes of playing alongside each other yesterday to finish at even par and both would give anything to win the U.S. Women's Open playoff today. They will give everything they have, which, granted, involves a couple of different inventories: Today's 18-hole playoff 9 a.m., ESPN
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2006
Morgan Pressel is not the most famous female golf prodigy in the world, nor the most gifted. Those labels, and potential burdens, belong to Michelle Wie. Yet Pressel possesses her own valuable traits, and a more impressive resume than Wie and nearly every other teen phenom on the brink of taking over the LPGA Tour. Coming off a couple of breakthrough performances last year -- highlighted by her resounding victory in the U.S. Women's Amateur and a second-place tie at the U.S. Women's Open -- Pressel will make her professional debut today in Hawaii in the SBS Open at Turtle Bay. Granted a commissioner's waiver that will allow her to play a full schedule before she turns 18 in May, Pressel doesn't think the transition from amateur to pro will be difficult given that her adjustment period began as a precocious 12-year-old playing in the 2001 U.S. Women's Open.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
A year ago, Shaun Micheel stood on the practice green at Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, N.Y., nearly unnoticed as he prepared for the 85th PGA Championship. It was only his third major championship, one that would become a life-altering experience for the 34-year-old tour pro from Memphis. By Sunday night, Micheel was lifting the Wanamaker Trophy in victory, and with it, the expectations that can often prove burdensome to players. Going into this year's PGA Championship, which begins tomorrow at Whistling Straits in Haven, Wis., Micheel is still searching to regain that magic.
SPORTS
By Bob Herzog and Bob Herzog,NEWSDAY | July 5, 2004
SOUTH HADLEY, Mass. - This was a fringe benefit even Meg Mallon could not have imagined. She came to the 15th hole with a four-stroke lead and when her third shot wound up on the fringe instead of on the green, she thought, "In the Open, a bogey doesn't hurt you." With that relaxed state of mind, Mallon promptly putted in from 25 feet away for a spectacular par that allowed her to withstand Annika Sorenstam's strong finish and capture her second U.S. Open championship. The 13-year gap between Women's Open wins is the largest in history.
SPORTS
By Bob Herzog and Bob Herzog,NEWSDAY | July 2, 2004
SOUTH HADLEY, Mass. - A teenage amateur with a penchant for giggles and tears and whose father is her caddie, tore up the Orchards Golf Club yesterday to grab the lead after a thunderstorm-delayed first day at the U.S. Women's Open. Oh, yes, Michelle Wie had a decent day, too. But though the crowd was much larger for the 14-year-old from Hawaii, the score was much better for 18-year-old Brittany Lincicome from Florida's Gulf Coast. Lincicome, with three birdies and an eagle on the back nine, tied the U.S. Women's Open record for an amateur with a 5-under-par 66, one shot better than veteran Patricia Meunier-Lebouc, a new mother who brought her 5-month-old baby to the tournament.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
WEST POINT, Miss. -- What was supposed to be a pleasant little news conference to announce the site of a future U.S. Women's Open turned into a rather testy session on gender equity yesterday at Old Waverly.There to announce that the 2002 Women's Open will be played at Prairie Dunes in Hutchinson, Kan., the chairman of the event's championship committee found herself defending the USGA's policy to pay half the prize money as it does for the men."We're working on that," said Mary Capouch, a member of the committee for 16 years.
SPORTS
August 11, 2006
Angela Stanford thought about playing a conservative shot from a tricky downhill lie in the 14th fairway. Instead, she talked herself into an aggressive play and ended up hitting the best shot of the best round of her life. Stanford deftly faded her 7-iron approach around a large greenside tree to set up a tap-in birdie, the last of her eight birdies in a bogey-free 64 yesterday that matched the lowest round in the history of the Canadian Women's Open in London, Ontario. "I think I've learned over the last couple of months when I start being conservative, and I don't just hit the shot that I'm feeling I should hit, that's when I get into trouble," said Stanford, three strokes ahead after the first round.
SPORTS
By Randall Mell and Randall Mell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2003
NORTH PLAINS, Ore. - Her father saw this coming when no one believed it possible, even his daughter. When Hilary Lunke rolled in a dramatic 15-foot birdie at the 18th hole to end yesterday's intensely waged three-way playoff, her father howled in the clubhouse. That's where Bill Homeyer escaped to after nine holes with the pressure mounting and Lunke fighting off charges from Angela Stanford and Kelly Robbins on Pumpkin Ridge's Witch Hollow Course. He watched one of the most dramatic conclusions in U.S. Women's Open history on television wondering if the tension could get any thicker when Stanford made a 24-foot birdie to tie Lunke for the lead at the final hole.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. - When Derek Tolan left his home outside Denver earlier this week, his friends at ThunderRidge High School had the typical request. "A lot of people asked me to get Tiger's autograph, Mickelson's, Duval's autograph," Tolan said yesterday. Tolan won't be your typical teen-ager here at Bethpage State Park for the 102nd U.S. Open. He won't be selling hot dogs. He won't be holding a portable scoreboard. He will be playing. At 16, Tolan is the youngest player in the field and one of the youngest ever to play in his country's national championship.
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