Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWomen S Movement
IN THE NEWS

Women S Movement

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By HARRIETT WOODS | January 26, 1992
The women's movement in this country is out of date -- not because it has gotten too far ahead, but because it is too far behind. Women's lives, choices and challenges have changed, and it's past time for the message and strategies to change as well.New economic realities like the two-income household have made family leave and child care into majority concerns. The majority of women have made it clear that they want abortion to remain a legal option. The bold women's agenda of the 1960s and '70s is now mainstream.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 7, 2010
I confess to feeling only slightly more rational than "Misery's" Kathy Bates. I want to strap Ellen Goodman into a chair and make her keep writing columns. Ms. Goodman, whose prose has graced newspaper pages for more than four decades, allegedly wrote her last column last week. I use "allegedly" in the hope that she was kidding. No one who has labored under the cudgel of relentless deadlines begrudges Ms. Goodman her hard-earned respite. Retirement seems too old a word for one so young in spirit.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | May 18, 1992
Washington -- Survivors should look this good.Frances Lear is a striking woman of 68 -- thin and elegantly dressed and assured, the last two parts understandable when the phrase for your worldly wealth has a "hundred" before the "million." On this day, she sits on a couch in a splendidly decorated suite in a quite posh Washington hotel. She is talking about "The Second Seduction," her newly published memoir, and the magazine she founded that bears her name, and her two decades of activity in the women's movement.
NEWS
By Jenny Dombrowski | December 28, 2006
I'm afraid I may have caused a disturbance in Betty Friedan's grave recently. I let ignorance run rampant in my classroom. I left at the break, claiming I couldn't stand listening to it anymore. Although that was true, the larger reason for my departure was the fact that I was ashamed. I was ashamed that I let a 20-something man say America needed a "men's movement" without saying anything in response. A woman in her late 30s said the women's movement had splintered because feminists were too unwilling to concede anything in their fight; I let that pass, too. I sat there while more 20-something men spoke with apparent authority that the movement failed because its leaders had been unable to deny their biological clocks.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 24, 1992
Boston. -- A young television producer calls to ask about the state of the women's movement. She is working on an update on where women are now and how they feel. I feel this way: instantly wary.In the Washington Post, Sally Quinn has declared feminism dead -- again -- this time murdered by its own leaders. In the New York Times, Bill Safire has declared that a ''new, natural womanism'' has risen from its ashes. The role models are political wives who choose freely to stand behind their men.On the best-seller lists are books women have bought to figure out whatever happened to the women's movement and what happens next.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 15, 1994
Boston. -- OK, so you should have been a brain surgeon. Up in the morning, out on the job. The White House limo drops you at the hospital. You open up a few craniums and you're home for dinner.This is the kind of health-care involvement nobody would criticize. It's the kind of two-career family everybody would understand. Unless you do an accidental frontal lobotomy on a major world leader, you're home free.If you don't want to go to the Easter Egg Roll, you can just get beeped. You don't even have to worry about what you wear.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 25, 1992
Boston. -- A friend says with a fine and frustrated humor that she has achieved exactly the right look for the '90s. Her consciousness is all raised up with no place to go.From time to time, it will appear in a letter to the editor or to a senator. When Anita Hill is pilloried or the man at work says something outrageous or she reads about leaking breast implants, it will spontaneously combust over lunch or on the phone with friends. And then she will return to the everyday concerns of her desktop, her family and her bills.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | September 10, 1992
This is supposed to be the year of the woman, according to political pundits, but Patricia Aburdene and John Naisbitt, authors of "Megatrends" and "Megatrends 2000," are far more optimistic.This is the Era of Woman, they proclaim in their recently published book "Megatrends for Women" (Villard Books, $22.50.)The best-selling authors predict that in the next millennium, there will be an end to the battle of the sexes -- and a burgeoning of collaborative union, with men and women working as equal partners.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 7, 2010
I confess to feeling only slightly more rational than "Misery's" Kathy Bates. I want to strap Ellen Goodman into a chair and make her keep writing columns. Ms. Goodman, whose prose has graced newspaper pages for more than four decades, allegedly wrote her last column last week. I use "allegedly" in the hope that she was kidding. No one who has labored under the cudgel of relentless deadlines begrudges Ms. Goodman her hard-earned respite. Retirement seems too old a word for one so young in spirit.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | December 30, 1991
PATRICIA IRELAND, former baton twirler, beauty queen and airline stewardess (back in the days when the term "flight attendant" was but a gleam in a feminist's eye), sure has come a long way.Today, the 46-year-old lawyer from Miami is heading the National Organization for Women. Lately, though, her time seems to be consumed talking about her "nice arrangement" -- a loving husband in Miami and a loving female companion in Washington.That's as much as she'll say about her two loves, wanting to keep her private life private.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 13, 2006
BOSTON -- This is what I remembered when the news of Betty Friedan's death on her 85th birthday came over the Internet. I remembered Aug. 26, 1970, the Women's Strike for Equality. I remembered Betty Friedan parading down New York's Fifth Avenue, in the front row, with tens of thousands of exhilarated women behind her. I also remembered the afternoon edition of my newspaper illustrating that march with two front-page photos. On the left was the pretty, blond smiling figurehead of some unknown group of Happy Homemakers.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Feminist leaders wrapped up their three-day conference in Baltimore yesterday vowing to push for action on a range of political issues and to draw America's poorest, most disenfranchised women into the movement. Invoking the school shooting near Flint, Mich., in February, Gloria Steinem said that women leaders must reach out to, rather than demonize, women like the mother of the 6-year-old boy who took a gun to school and is accused of shooting to death a girl in his first-grade classroom.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
Young women who are editing university law reviews, conducting breast cancer research and organizing rape-crisis centers opened Feminist Expo 2000 yesterday with a tribute to leaders in the women's movement who helped pave their way. Among those recognized was Betty Friedan, who told the crowd at the Baltimore Convention Center that the fight facing young women is about balancing demands of their work lives and details of their private ones. "There's got to be a whole new look and a whole new vision where the responsibilities of life are shared equally by the people who work, who are women and men," said Friedan, whose 1963 book "The Feminine Mystique" became a manifesto for the modern women's-rights movement.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Gail Gibson and Jean Marbella and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
These might seem like good times for feminists, with Madeleine K. Albright overseeing the nation's foreign policy and the U.S. women's soccer team inspiring a new generation of female athletes. Yet, as some of the mothers of the modern women's movement, including Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem, open Feminist Expo 2000 at Baltimore's Convention Center tomorrow, their cause seems to be on the defensive. "There is a constant attempt to gut the successes of the latter half of the 20th century, which were because of the advances in the women's movement," says Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority Foundation, which organized the three-day gathering.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 15, 1994
Boston. -- OK, so you should have been a brain surgeon. Up in the morning, out on the job. The White House limo drops you at the hospital. You open up a few craniums and you're home for dinner.This is the kind of health-care involvement nobody would criticize. It's the kind of two-career family everybody would understand. Unless you do an accidental frontal lobotomy on a major world leader, you're home free.If you don't want to go to the Easter Egg Roll, you can just get beeped. You don't even have to worry about what you wear.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 23, 1994
This may not be a popular observation but I'm going to make it anyway: It's time for both the Women's Movement and the Men's Movement to step back and take a long, hard look at the State of the Gender Revolution.What needs to be asked is this: Are we headed in the right direction?There is no question that over the last three decades many positive societal changes have occurred as a result of, first, the Women's Movement and, second, the response of well-intentioned men to the Women's Movement.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 23, 1994
This may not be a popular observation but I'm going to make it anyway: It's time for both the Women's Movement and the Men's Movement to step back and take a long, hard look at the State of the Gender Revolution.What needs to be asked is this: Are we headed in the right direction?There is no question that over the last three decades many positive societal changes have occurred as a result of, first, the Women's Movement and, second, the response of well-intentioned men to the Women's Movement.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | September 10, 1992
This is supposed to be the year of the woman, according to political pundits, but Patricia Aburdene and John Naisbitt, authors of "Megatrends" and "Megatrends 2000," are far more optimistic.This is the Era of Woman, they proclaim in their recently published book "Megatrends for Women" (Villard Books, $22.50.)The best-selling authors predict that in the next millennium, there will be an end to the battle of the sexes -- and a burgeoning of collaborative union, with men and women working as equal partners.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.