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By Susan Reimer | February 23, 1999
DANIELLE Crittenden is just shy of 40. She is married to a successful journalist from a wealthy Canadian family who doesn't do anywhere near half the chores in their Washington home.She has two children, a girl, 7, and a boy, 5, for whom she is available when they are awake or home from school. She had a part-time sitter until the second child was born, then hired a full-time au pair. When both children entered school, she down-sized to just a housekeeper. But she says she makes dinner for her family almost every night.
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By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
A glance at your average magazine stand will reveal any number of women's magazines, but the notion of a radio station airing almost nothing but women's voices is rare. And yet on Monday, a Baltimore radio station will begin doing just that. WWLG, which currently specializes in oldies, will get new call letters, WVIE, and a new talk-show format that will feature mostly female hosts. The 50,000-watt station, at 1370 AM, will be home to some of the best-known women in syndicated talk radio, including Dr. Laura Schlessinger, Laura Ingraham, Tammy Bruce, Dr. Joy Browne and the Satellite Sisters.
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 4, 2002
ECONOMIST Sylvia Ann Hewlett is the author of a new book chronicling the unhappiness of successful women who postponed childbearing for the sake of their careers only to learn that they had waited too long. Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children has received lots of attention: 60 Minutes, Oprah, the morning news shows and newspaper and magazine ink. But the book itself isn't selling and that, more than the specter of power-suited women weeping over empty cradles, is the phenomenon: How is it possible the public isn't slapping down $22 in the face of this publicity juggernaut?
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | March 21, 2004
WHEN MYRNA BLYTH LEFT the business of editing women's magazines, she didn't just burn her bridges. She blew them up. The former editor of Ladies Home Journal and More magazines is now the author of Spin Sisters: How the Women of the Media Sell Unhappiness and Liberalism to the Women of America. (St. Martin's Press, $24.95) And she isn't just telling secrets out of school, such as how advertisers have co-opted the editorial content to such a degree that it's hard to tell the ads from the news items.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
Magazines may be printed on glossy paper, but the need for authenticity is apparently almost as popular as the suddenly ubiquitous desire to simplify. Two magazines - one new, the other a venerable brand undergoing an editorial revamping - are vigorously pursuing grit instead of glamour. This March, Lifetime Entertainment Services - a joint venture of Hearst Magazines and the Walt Disney Co. - will start Lifetime, a magazine built on the cable channel's formula of "real life, real women."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom LoBianco | February 3, 2000
Women's magazines over the years Don't expect just a collection of personality tests from the pages of Cosmopolitan in the new exhibit at the Newseum in Arlington, Va. Titled "Reflected Lives, Directed Lives: American Women's Magazines," the show explores how the first 200 years of U.S. social history would look through the pages of women's magazines. Opening tomorrow and running through April 30, the display invites viewers to act as media historians as they examine the show. "Reflected Lives, Directed Lives: American Women's Magazines" opens tomorrow and runs through April 30 at the Newseum, 1101 Wilson Blvd.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | March 21, 2004
WHEN MYRNA BLYTH LEFT the business of editing women's magazines, she didn't just burn her bridges. She blew them up. The former editor of Ladies Home Journal and More magazines is now the author of Spin Sisters: How the Women of the Media Sell Unhappiness and Liberalism to the Women of America. (St. Martin's Press, $24.95) And she isn't just telling secrets out of school, such as how advertisers have co-opted the editorial content to such a degree that it's hard to tell the ads from the news items.
NEWS
By Rena Selya | December 12, 1995
NEW YORK -- Millions of American women rely on the health information that appears each month in the women's magazines. I recently reviewed 24 articles in 13 of these magazines published between 1989 and 1995, looking for information about the safety of silicone breast implants. What I found was a frightening array of inaccuracies and disinformation.Most of the articles on silicone breast implants claimed that they are dangerous and cause a variety of health problems.A 1989 Vogue article cataloged the alleged effects of silicone implants on the immune system and connective tissue.
FEATURES
By J. Greg Phelan and J. Greg Phelan,New York Times News Service | March 28, 1995
Publishers of women's magazines have been scrambling to find an on-line niche, although surveys show that only 20 percent of the 5.2 million subscribers to the top commercial on-line services are women.Many of the magazines, including Elle and Women's Day, have chosen to team with large providers like America Online to draw women into cyberspace. But Self, which aims at educated women with high incomes, has decided to bypass the big services in favor of an experimental in-house approach to building an interactive presence.
FEATURES
By Paul D. Colford and Paul D. Colford,NEWSDAY | June 21, 1999
NEW YORK -- Barbara Rempe became upset during a visit to the public library. It was there that Rempe, a financial adviser from Long Island, first saw the April issue of Redbook, whose top cover line was "His Most Secret Love Wish."On Page 129, Rempe learned the secret, and on Page 131, discovered still more titillation in a step-by-step guide.Rempe says half the time she only glances at the subscription copies of Redbook that have come to her home before they go to the waiting room at her husband's chiropractic office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
Magazines may be printed on glossy paper, but the need for authenticity is apparently almost as popular as the suddenly ubiquitous desire to simplify. Two magazines - one new, the other a venerable brand undergoing an editorial revamping - are vigorously pursuing grit instead of glamour. This March, Lifetime Entertainment Services - a joint venture of Hearst Magazines and the Walt Disney Co. - will start Lifetime, a magazine built on the cable channel's formula of "real life, real women."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 4, 2002
ECONOMIST Sylvia Ann Hewlett is the author of a new book chronicling the unhappiness of successful women who postponed childbearing for the sake of their careers only to learn that they had waited too long. Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children has received lots of attention: 60 Minutes, Oprah, the morning news shows and newspaper and magazine ink. But the book itself isn't selling and that, more than the specter of power-suited women weeping over empty cradles, is the phenomenon: How is it possible the public isn't slapping down $22 in the face of this publicity juggernaut?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom LoBianco | February 3, 2000
Women's magazines over the years Don't expect just a collection of personality tests from the pages of Cosmopolitan in the new exhibit at the Newseum in Arlington, Va. Titled "Reflected Lives, Directed Lives: American Women's Magazines," the show explores how the first 200 years of U.S. social history would look through the pages of women's magazines. Opening tomorrow and running through April 30, the display invites viewers to act as media historians as they examine the show. "Reflected Lives, Directed Lives: American Women's Magazines" opens tomorrow and runs through April 30 at the Newseum, 1101 Wilson Blvd.
FEATURES
By Paul D. Colford and Paul D. Colford,NEWSDAY | June 21, 1999
NEW YORK -- Barbara Rempe became upset during a visit to the public library. It was there that Rempe, a financial adviser from Long Island, first saw the April issue of Redbook, whose top cover line was "His Most Secret Love Wish."On Page 129, Rempe learned the secret, and on Page 131, discovered still more titillation in a step-by-step guide.Rempe says half the time she only glances at the subscription copies of Redbook that have come to her home before they go to the waiting room at her husband's chiropractic office.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 23, 1999
DANIELLE Crittenden is just shy of 40. She is married to a successful journalist from a wealthy Canadian family who doesn't do anywhere near half the chores in their Washington home.She has two children, a girl, 7, and a boy, 5, for whom she is available when they are awake or home from school. She had a part-time sitter until the second child was born, then hired a full-time au pair. When both children entered school, she down-sized to just a housekeeper. But she says she makes dinner for her family almost every night.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- This indicates just how out of joint the times are: Human nature is startling news.Asserting that there is a human nature has become a radical political act, which today's feminists stigmatize as reactionary. This troubles Danielle Crittenden not at all.A 35-year-old writer and mother of two, her new book, "What Our Mothers Didn't Tell Us: Why Happiness Eludes the Modern Woman," is written with the verve and wit she brings to editing the Women's Quarterly of the Independent Women's Forum.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- This indicates just how out of joint the times are: Human nature is startling news.Asserting that there is a human nature has become a radical political act, which today's feminists stigmatize as reactionary. This troubles Danielle Crittenden not at all.A 35-year-old writer and mother of two, her new book, "What Our Mothers Didn't Tell Us: Why Happiness Eludes the Modern Woman," is written with the verve and wit she brings to editing the Women's Quarterly of the Independent Women's Forum.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
A glance at your average magazine stand will reveal any number of women's magazines, but the notion of a radio station airing almost nothing but women's voices is rare. And yet on Monday, a Baltimore radio station will begin doing just that. WWLG, which currently specializes in oldies, will get new call letters, WVIE, and a new talk-show format that will feature mostly female hosts. The 50,000-watt station, at 1370 AM, will be home to some of the best-known women in syndicated talk radio, including Dr. Laura Schlessinger, Laura Ingraham, Tammy Bruce, Dr. Joy Browne and the Satellite Sisters.
NEWS
By Rena Selya | December 12, 1995
NEW YORK -- Millions of American women rely on the health information that appears each month in the women's magazines. I recently reviewed 24 articles in 13 of these magazines published between 1989 and 1995, looking for information about the safety of silicone breast implants. What I found was a frightening array of inaccuracies and disinformation.Most of the articles on silicone breast implants claimed that they are dangerous and cause a variety of health problems.A 1989 Vogue article cataloged the alleged effects of silicone implants on the immune system and connective tissue.
FEATURES
By J. Greg Phelan and J. Greg Phelan,New York Times News Service | March 28, 1995
Publishers of women's magazines have been scrambling to find an on-line niche, although surveys show that only 20 percent of the 5.2 million subscribers to the top commercial on-line services are women.Many of the magazines, including Elle and Women's Day, have chosen to team with large providers like America Online to draw women into cyberspace. But Self, which aims at educated women with high incomes, has decided to bypass the big services in favor of an experimental in-house approach to building an interactive presence.
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