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NEWS
By HARRIETT WOODS | January 26, 1992
The women's movement in this country is out of date -- not because it has gotten too far ahead, but because it is too far behind. Women's lives, choices and challenges have changed, and it's past time for the message and strategies to change as well.New economic realities like the two-income household have made family leave and child care into majority concerns. The majority of women have made it clear that they want abortion to remain a legal option. The bold women's agenda of the 1960s and '70s is now mainstream.
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NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2006
Moral Disorder Margaret Atwood Doubleday / 240 pages / $23.95 Canada's Margaret Atwood is, without doubt or hyperbole, an exceptional writer who has charted the territory of women's lives with seamless skill and precision. Her latest collection, Moral Disorder (which also constitutes an informal novel in interconnected stories), is unerring in its elliptical perambulations through one woman's life and the lives of those around her. Atwood has long deconstructed the lives of women in her fiction, delving deep into the darker realms of the lives of women and girls, exploring the nuances of various historical eras and the way women have lived - or have been forced to live - in those periods.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - The United States and other developed nations must increase their funding for international family-planning programs or women will continue to die from a lack of access to reproductive health care, officials said yesterday. The U.S. and United Nations officials spoke at news conferences here and in London to release the U.N. Population Fund's annual report. The report said about 500,000 maternal deaths occur each year in developing countries, where just half of all births are professionally attended.
NEWS
By Nancy Rubin Stuart | March 22, 2005
Silence gives the proper grace to women. - Tecmessa, a concubine in Sophocles' Ajax, 440 B.C. TODAY, 26 centuries later, few women seek permission from men to speak in their own voices, let alone worry about doing so gracefully. While corporate women have yet to shatter the glass ceiling, they continue to rap loudly upon it. Equally vociferous are academic women, who have been disproportionately rejected from tenured professorships in many prestigious colleges and universities. Less well-known are the recent efforts of the publishing industry to rectify centuries of the silence about women's lives through the publication of their biographies.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 24, 1992
Boston. -- A young television producer calls to ask about the state of the women's movement. She is working on an update on where women are now and how they feel. I feel this way: instantly wary.In the Washington Post, Sally Quinn has declared feminism dead -- again -- this time murdered by its own leaders. In the New York Times, Bill Safire has declared that a ''new, natural womanism'' has risen from its ashes. The role models are political wives who choose freely to stand behind their men.On the best-seller lists are books women have bought to figure out whatever happened to the women's movement and what happens next.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | February 25, 1992
Boston. -- A friend says with a fine and frustrated humor that she has achieved exactly the right look for the '90s. Her consciousness is all raised up with no place to go.From time to time, it will appear in a letter to the editor or to a senator. When Anita Hill is pilloried or the man at work says something outrageous or she reads about leaking breast implants, it will spontaneously combust over lunch or on the phone with friends. And then she will return to the everyday concerns of her desktop, her family and her bills.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
The Enoch Pratt Free Library has scheduled a series of events to mark Women's History Month. The programs - all free and open to the public - are intended to note the contributions that women have made, as well as examine issues affecting women's lives. Included in the schedule of events: The National James Baldwin Literary Society will sponsor a discussion about the women in Baldwin's life and how they influenced his work at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Waverly branch, 400 E. 33rd St. Alice McGill will present Ain't I a Woman?
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | August 11, 1992
TOKYO -- The Japanese haven't needed Murphy Brown's baby or Vice President Dan Quayle to get heated up over family values this summer.In magazines, on television and in classrooms, the topic suddenly guaranteed to get strong expressions out of a normally shy population is whether a family needs a father."
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2006
Moral Disorder Margaret Atwood Doubleday / 240 pages / $23.95 Canada's Margaret Atwood is, without doubt or hyperbole, an exceptional writer who has charted the territory of women's lives with seamless skill and precision. Her latest collection, Moral Disorder (which also constitutes an informal novel in interconnected stories), is unerring in its elliptical perambulations through one woman's life and the lives of those around her. Atwood has long deconstructed the lives of women in her fiction, delving deep into the darker realms of the lives of women and girls, exploring the nuances of various historical eras and the way women have lived - or have been forced to live - in those periods.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 11, 2001
WHEN THE magazine Real Simple hit newsstands in April 2000, it was neither real nor simple. It was supposed to be a niche magazine aimed at college-educated working mothers who didn't have time for glue guns or gourmet clubs. It was supposed to be that woman's smart girlfriend, with fresh ideas for simplifying and de-stressing her complex, layered life. Instead, the ads were impossibly high end. The service story ideas were stupid (how to clean a toilet), and readers couldn't tell the editorial copy from the advertising copy.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
The Enoch Pratt Free Library has scheduled a series of events to mark Women's History Month. The programs - all free and open to the public - are intended to note the contributions that women have made, as well as examine issues affecting women's lives. Included in the schedule of events: The National James Baldwin Literary Society will sponsor a discussion about the women in Baldwin's life and how they influenced his work at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Waverly branch, 400 E. 33rd St. Alice McGill will present Ain't I a Woman?
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
Responding to a female rabbi's invitation, 55 women from their 30s to their 70s showed up at the Jewish Museum of Maryland yesterday to write stories of their lives for the museum's archives. The rabbi, Nina Beth Cardin, said yesterday's event was the first such writing exercise at the museum, and was designed to preserve pieces of women's lives and minds at the turn of this century -- pieces that might otherwise pass unnoticed. "This will give us a view of Baltimore as it hasn't been recorded before," Cardin told the group.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2002
Sometimes we meet over long lunches at the Cheesecake Factory. At other times, a performance of the Baltimore Symphony or a play. But wherever my sorority sisters assemble, you can pretty much count on smiles, laughter and support. That, and enough loud chatter to warrant earplugs. Tonight's venue is the Enoch Pratt Free Library for a book signing. The topic is one we intimately understand. So far, I am the only one in my circle to have read Monique Greenwood's new book: Having What Matters: The Black Woman's Guide To Creating the Life You Really Want.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jason Edward Kaufman and Jason Edward Kaufman,Special to the Sun | December 16, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Wandering through Virtue & Beauty, the exhibit of Renaissance portraits of women on view at the National Gallery, is a lot like attending a fashion show. Dozens of smooth-skinned, fabulously coiffed youths show off clothes rich beyond imagining as they glide serenely in their own fabulous worlds. Who are these goddesses, these queens of chic, these splendid ladies? One imagines them dashing about town, their every wish attended to by flocks of adoring servants. Ah, to be a stylish young woman in Renaissance Italy!
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 11, 2001
WHEN THE magazine Real Simple hit newsstands in April 2000, it was neither real nor simple. It was supposed to be a niche magazine aimed at college-educated working mothers who didn't have time for glue guns or gourmet clubs. It was supposed to be that woman's smart girlfriend, with fresh ideas for simplifying and de-stressing her complex, layered life. Instead, the ads were impossibly high end. The service story ideas were stupid (how to clean a toilet), and readers couldn't tell the editorial copy from the advertising copy.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - The United States and other developed nations must increase their funding for international family-planning programs or women will continue to die from a lack of access to reproductive health care, officials said yesterday. The U.S. and United Nations officials spoke at news conferences here and in London to release the U.N. Population Fund's annual report. The report said about 500,000 maternal deaths occur each year in developing countries, where just half of all births are professionally attended.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 11, 1994
There is no sign on the door. You would not know they were there. But if you stand quietly outside that door, you can hear the soft, low sounds of women listening.They are the volunteers of WISH, Women in Self Help, and when troubled women ring their phones, they practice a special kind of listening. The kind of listening that hears between the lines, the kind that lets the caller talk her way to a clearing in the woods. Listening without judgment."Women solve problems by talking," says Mary Macedo, a WISH volunteer for 14 years.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | September 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Harried American women believe their lives are being consumed by balancing jobs and families, according to a new national survey of what women think."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 30, 2000
THIS WAS GOING to be one of those "Cliff Notes" columns. You know the type. I digest a new book and spit out the high points for the women who don't have time to get to the bookstore, let alone read. It is usually a book that elucidates some aspect of our layered lives: kids, marriage, work, health. And when "Flux," by Peggy Orenstein arrived at my desk, it appeared to be an ideal candidate. "Women on Sex, Work, Love, Kids, and Life in a Half-Changed World," read the subtitle. That pretty much covers everything, I thought.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Gail Gibson and Jean Marbella and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
These might seem like good times for feminists, with Madeleine K. Albright overseeing the nation's foreign policy and the U.S. women's soccer team inspiring a new generation of female athletes. Yet, as some of the mothers of the modern women's movement, including Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem, open Feminist Expo 2000 at Baltimore's Convention Center tomorrow, their cause seems to be on the defensive. "There is a constant attempt to gut the successes of the latter half of the 20th century, which were because of the advances in the women's movement," says Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority Foundation, which organized the three-day gathering.
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