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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | January 29, 1991
County Executive Robert R. Neall is an abortion opponent. But he says he will not stop an appointed women's commission from lobbying for abortion-rights legislation at the state level.That is good news for women's activists who hope the Anne Arundel County Commission for Women -- barely visible for much of the 1980s -- is becoming more forceful and influential.The commission took its most vocal, public stand in years during the 1990 General Assembly session, when it lobbied in support of pro-abortion rights legislation.
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NEWS
By Connie Morella and Ritu Sharma | March 18, 2009
During her confirmation hearings to be secretary of state, Hillary Clinton signaled a new direction for U.S. foreign policy, saying: "If half of the world's population remains vulnerable to economic, political, legal and social marginalization, our hope of advancing democracy and prosperity will remain in serious jeopardy." This month, the administration backed up those words with the nomination of Melanne Verveer, co-founder of Vital Voices Global Partnership, as global women's issues chief, an ambassador-level position.
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NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | March 9, 1992
Televised date rape trials, sexual harassment hearings, studies reporting inferior education for girls, books declaring a "backlash against feminism" -- the issues are complex and frightening ones for womento confront.But organizers of the annual Anne Arundel County Women's Fair hope a daylong conference Saturday will help educate women on some issues and raise consciousness about others."In these last several years, women have certainly felt a sense of frustration, as domestic violence, violent crimes against women andsexual harassment have continued to be serious problems," said PeggyRightnour, co-chairwoman of the county Commission for Women and a fair organizer.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 24, 2008
As chairwoman of the Harford County Commission for Women, Lisa Tittle is brimming with ideas on how to improve the lives of women. Why not start a halfway house with training programs for women leaving prison, she asked. How about opening a school for young mothers, who want to return to class but cannot overcome hurdles like child care and transportation? Maybe the commission should lend its support to the Homecoming Project, an association that helps women recovering from substance abuse.
NEWS
By Robert Scheer | May 19, 1994
THE GREAT line that fueled the witch hunt was "they just don't get it." Hack politicians who happened to be women could suddenly exude a history of wronged innocence as they demanded the head of Clarence Thomas.Not "getting it" meant that you believe that everyone, including a man accused of sexual harassment, is innocent until proved guilty. Not "getting it" meant holding that there ought to be a reasonable statute of limitations on such charges. Not "getting it" meant believing that a complaint of sexual harassment should not automatically overwhelm judgment of the totality of a person's life.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 5, 1994
CAIRO, Egypt -- Women want more power over their lives, they are saying at the United Nations conference on global overcrowding, which formally opens today.The conference already is becoming a forum on women's rights, with "empowerment" the buzzword, and agendas are heavy with women's issues, to an extent some say is rare in such world conferences."It's a women's conference," said a pleased Roxanna Carrillo, a Peruvian representative of UNIFEM, the United Nations Development Fund for Women.
NEWS
July 19, 1992
Smoke's Not GreenI am writing regarding the editorial, "The Green, Green Grass of Home," which appeared June 27. RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) represents suppliers of pesticide products used in the urban market, especially lawn care.The effort in your editorial to link lawn-care pesticides and cigarette smoke is inappropriate and misleading. It may be correct that secondary inhalation of smoke has been associated scientifically with elevated health risks.However, there is absolutely no indication that pesticide run-off from urban lawns is a problem nor that there is any linkage between pesticide run-off and increased health risks.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | May 22, 1992
EVERY FOUR years, we hear about the gender gap and how women voters will be the deciding factor in one political race or another.And every four years, we're told that more women than ever before are running for local, state and national offices and that this will make a difference because the men in power will have to be more "sensitive" to the concerns of women voters.And now we're hearing that it's The Year of the Woman for the U.S. Senate, which has several women running for a seat, thanks to Anita Hill's ill-treatment before all those graying white men in chambers.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Now we know what the First Lady's pilgrimage through South Asia and its timing are about. On this quasi-state visit, Hillary Rodham Clinton is having a first-hand look at the governance of major countries, providing an insightful link to the president that no ambassador could convey. With two traditional societies governed by woman prime ministers, it is natural for "women's issues" to arise in discussions. Important issues they are.And we are sure these impressions will not be wasted on the First Lady's traveling companion.
NEWS
By Connie Morella and Ritu Sharma | March 18, 2009
During her confirmation hearings to be secretary of state, Hillary Clinton signaled a new direction for U.S. foreign policy, saying: "If half of the world's population remains vulnerable to economic, political, legal and social marginalization, our hope of advancing democracy and prosperity will remain in serious jeopardy." This month, the administration backed up those words with the nomination of Melanne Verveer, co-founder of Vital Voices Global Partnership, as global women's issues chief, an ambassador-level position.
NEWS
January 20, 2007
ELIZABETH FOX-GENOVESE, 65 Author on women's issues Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, a historian and author who influenced conservative thought on women's issues, has died in Atlanta. Dr. Fox-Genovese, the Eleonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities at Emory University, died Jan. 2 at Emory University Hospital of complications from surgery in October, the university said in a statement posted on its Web site. A self-described complex conservative, Dr. Fox-Genovese earned her doctorate at Harvard.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,sun reporter | November 27, 2006
In Maryland politics, 2006 was not exactly the Year of the Woman. No major statewide office was captured by a woman. The eight-member congressional delegation remains all-male. And after the number of women serving in Maryland's General Assembly reached the highest peak in the history of the state legislature, Election Day reduced that number by more than 10 percent. "Women had a very bad year in Maryland," said Paula C.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | November 22, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration appointed an agency veteran yesterday to take on the politically sensitive role of advocating for women's health issues as it faces criticism that abortion politics are affecting decision making. Dr. Kathleen Uhl will replace Dr. Susan F. Wood, who resigned as director of the Office of Women's Health in September to protest the FDA's decision to delay approval of over-the-counter sales of the "morning-after" pill. Wood accused the agency of caving in to conservative pressure and ignoring sound science.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Iranian writer Azar Nafisi believes in using the power of imagination to change women's lives. Her best-selling book, Reading Lolita in Tehran, tells the story of a clandestine book group Nafisi held at her own home in defiance of government book bans. The literature she shared with her seven female students - works by Vladimir Nabokov, Jane Austen, Henry James, F. Scott Fitzgerald - offered temporary escape and perspective on the totalitarian regime in which they were living. Inside their teacher's home, the young women shed their veils and gained a new way of perceiving themselves as well as the fundamentalism oppressing them.
NEWS
By Carmen Barroso | June 30, 2004
NEW YORK - There has been quite a bit of chatter on the Web about how President Bush is trying to portray his middle initial, W, as standing for "women" and attempting to cast his agenda in a pro-woman light. While no elected official will ever declare that he is "anti-woman," it is difficult to see the Bush agenda from any other perspective. Soon after his inauguration, Mr. Bush issued the global gag rule, an executive order that denies U.S. government assistance to family planning or reproductive health agencies in other countries that make any reference to abortion in the course of counseling or providing services to their clients.
NEWS
August 11, 2003
IN IRAQ, women account for nearly 50 percent of the country's 24 million people. Among Iraqis ages 15-64, they number about the same, or 6.5 million. So it stands to reason that the United States would want women involved in the reconstruction of postwar Iraq and named to positions of authority. Three women have been named to the interim Governing Council established by the U.S. authority and others sit on local city councils. But for coalition forces, elevating the status of women in this male-dominated, Muslim society is a goal as problematic as it is admirable.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 10, 1992
Boston.--A Week before the election, one of the funnier and mouthier young women in my family sent me a copy of a Toys R Us ad. There, in living color, was the candidate of toymakers' dreams: ''Barbie for President.''This doll of a candidate was dressed for her Inaugural Prom in star-spangled tulle. Though she was born in the 1950s, Barbie still didn't look old enough to pass the constitutional age test. Furthermore, she wasn't running for president, she was posing for president.The letter that came with this ad asked wryly if this was the change that my generation of women had labored so long and mightily to produce for the next.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
Carroll should join the 13 Maryland counties that already have women's commissions, and the county's State House delegation should enthusiastically support legislation needed to create such an organization during the next session.Why does Carroll need a women's commission? Women make up 50.7 percent of the county's population. They need an institutional voice to represent them in county government. For too many years, people mistakenly thought government agencies adequately addressed women's needs.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2001
Westminster resident Naomi Benzil, a member of the Maryland Commission for Women since the fall, is eager to increase participation in the advocacy group in Carroll County and elsewhere. "Lots of people say why have a commission for women," said Benzil, who was appointed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening to a four-year term. "For those who wonder, I share this philosophy: when the concerns for women are positively addressed, the result is that family life and the economic wellbeing of entire community benefit."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Feminist leaders wrapped up their three-day conference in Baltimore yesterday vowing to push for action on a range of political issues and to draw America's poorest, most disenfranchised women into the movement. Invoking the school shooting near Flint, Mich., in February, Gloria Steinem said that women leaders must reach out to, rather than demonize, women like the mother of the 6-year-old boy who took a gun to school and is accused of shooting to death a girl in his first-grade classroom.
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