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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
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FEATURES
November 1, 2007
The BET Foundation will sponsor a free symposium called "Remembering Our Health" on Saturday aimed at increasing awareness of health-related issues among African-American women. National health data show a disparity in the rates of heart disease, diabetes and AIDS among black women and other groups. The symposium will offer free health screenings, exercise and healthy-cooking demonstrations and panel discussions. It will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Coppin State University at 2500 W. North Ave. in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2001
The Maryland Institute, College of Art has purchased the former Women's Hospital building in Baltimore's Bolton Hill historic district for $1 million and plans to convert it to a residence hall for about 225 students at an estimated cost of $10 million to $12 million. The sale, made final Thursday, marks a new chapter for the property at 140 W. Lafayette Ave., a blocklong building that has been vacant for seven years and has been the focus of concern about neighborhood blight. "It's a positive development," said George Lavdas, a Bolton Hill resident who has led the effort to find an appropriate owner for the former hospital.
NEWS
July 7, 2006
For the 16th straight year, Johns Hopkins Hospital has earned the top spot in the in U.S. News and World Report's annual list of the best hospitals nationwide. "Once again, the magazine and medical professionals across the nation have affirmed the excellence of our faculty physicians, our nurses and our staff," Dr. Edward Miller, dean and chief executive of Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in a letter to employees. Hopkins also ranked first in five specialties: ear, nose and throat, gynecology, kidney disease, urology and rheumatology.
NEWS
By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 15, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - "Spacious rooms. Views of the city skyline. ... Elegant dM-icor in warm and sophisticated tones ... Fine linens and terry cloth robes ... High Tea served every afternoon." Sounds like an ad for a five-star hotel, right? Actually, it is an enticing promo for a new unit, The Pavillion, at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. The Pavillion "is for people who wish to pay for additional amenities," said Christine Collins, director of patient access services, speaking at a recent Philadelphia conference on "premier" hospital services.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | May 13, 1993
If I'm Reggie Lewis, I get a third opinion, and a fourth, and a fifth. I charter a plane, visit every heart specialist in the land, then decide whether to resume my basketball career.But Reggie Lewis isn't going to do that.No, Reggie Lewis got the diagnosis he wanted -- the one that will enable him to continue playing in the NBA. Maybe this second team of medical experts is right, maybe not. But rarely are two sets of opinions so far apart.The first set of doctors -- the "Dream Team" of 12 cardiologists assembled by the Boston Celtics -- said the former Dunbar High star was suffering from a life-threatening heart condition.
NEWS
July 7, 2006
For the 16th straight year, Johns Hopkins Hospital has earned the top spot in the in U.S. News and World Report's annual list of the best hospitals nationwide. "Once again, the magazine and medical professionals across the nation have affirmed the excellence of our faculty physicians, our nurses and our staff," Dr. Edward Miller, dean and chief executive of Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in a letter to employees. Hopkins also ranked first in five specialties: ear, nose and throat, gynecology, kidney disease, urology and rheumatology.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996
Mercy Medical Center of Baltimore is the only Maryland hospital on the annual "Top 100" list issued yesterday by HCIA Inc., the Baltimore health data company, and William M. Mercer Inc., a national consulting firm.The rankings are based on statistics including death and complication rates, average lengths of stay, profitability and financial reserves, and shifting from inpatient to outpatient care.Hospitals are grouped into categories -- small rural hospitals and large teaching hospitals, for example -- and compared with their peers.
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
The Greater Baltimore Medical Center's nature trail, which took a beating last year from Tropical Storm Isabel, has been renovated. The hospital will hold a dedication ceremony at 3 p.m. today to mark the opening of the improved, mile-long trail on GBMC's campus. The renovation culminates more than a year's planning and construction, which restored the trail after its destruction by Isabel last year. Doug Smith, president of the GBMC Foundation, received a call last year from Cindy Crawley, president of the GBMC Women's Hospital Board, about repairing the trail, which Crawley and her husband, William, a GBMC plastic surgeon, enjoyed with their dogs.
FEATURES
November 1, 2007
The BET Foundation will sponsor a free symposium called "Remembering Our Health" on Saturday aimed at increasing awareness of health-related issues among African-American women. National health data show a disparity in the rates of heart disease, diabetes and AIDS among black women and other groups. The symposium will offer free health screenings, exercise and healthy-cooking demonstrations and panel discussions. It will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Coppin State University at 2500 W. North Ave. in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
The Greater Baltimore Medical Center's nature trail, which took a beating last year from Tropical Storm Isabel, has been renovated. The hospital will hold a dedication ceremony at 3 p.m. today to mark the opening of the improved, mile-long trail on GBMC's campus. The renovation culminates more than a year's planning and construction, which restored the trail after its destruction by Isabel last year. Doug Smith, president of the GBMC Foundation, received a call last year from Cindy Crawley, president of the GBMC Women's Hospital Board, about repairing the trail, which Crawley and her husband, William, a GBMC plastic surgeon, enjoyed with their dogs.
NEWS
By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 15, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - "Spacious rooms. Views of the city skyline. ... Elegant dM-icor in warm and sophisticated tones ... Fine linens and terry cloth robes ... High Tea served every afternoon." Sounds like an ad for a five-star hotel, right? Actually, it is an enticing promo for a new unit, The Pavillion, at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. The Pavillion "is for people who wish to pay for additional amenities," said Christine Collins, director of patient access services, speaking at a recent Philadelphia conference on "premier" hospital services.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2001
Imagine the world without cancer. That's what Lt. Col. George E. Peoples of Fulton is trying to accomplish with his cancer vaccines. Peoples, 38, a surgical oncologist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, will be recognized as one of Ten Outstanding Young Americans for 2001 by the U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce on Jan. 27. The award is presented annually to outstanding Americans with exceptional achievements who have demonstrated service...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2001
The Maryland Institute, College of Art has purchased the former Women's Hospital building in Baltimore's Bolton Hill historic district for $1 million and plans to convert it to a residence hall for about 225 students at an estimated cost of $10 million to $12 million. The sale, made final Thursday, marks a new chapter for the property at 140 W. Lafayette Ave., a blocklong building that has been vacant for seven years and has been the focus of concern about neighborhood blight. "It's a positive development," said George Lavdas, a Bolton Hill resident who has led the effort to find an appropriate owner for the former hospital.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
With Greater Baltimore Medical Center still undecided as to whether to join with Johns Hopkins Medicine or nearby St. Joseph Medical Center, St. Joseph said yesterday it "has no plans to continue discussions with GBMC" and will seek other partners."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | February 1, 1993
County Executive Robert R. Neall has announced that his cash-strapped administration wants to give $600,000 to help Anne Arundel Medical Center build a new women's hospital on Jennifer Road.The money would be paid in three annual $200,000 installments from the county's capital budget beginning with the coming fiscal year. The County Council still must approve the allocation."I have become infamous about giving bad news," said Mr. Neall, appearing Saturday at the hospital's fund-raising event in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 2001
Imagine the world without cancer. That's what Lt. Col. George E. Peoples of Fulton is trying to accomplish with his cancer vaccines. Peoples, 38, a surgical oncologist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, will be recognized as one of Ten Outstanding Young Americans for 2001 by the U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce on Jan. 27. The award is presented annually to outstanding Americans with exceptional achievements who have demonstrated service...
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
The board of the Hospital for the Women of Maryland has said it will drop its financial support for Greater Baltimore Medical Center if GBMC joins St. Joseph Medical Center, its Towson neighbor.The Women's Hospital was one of two that merged to form GMBC in 1965. The board continues to manage the endowment of the old hospital, and gives the proceeds each year to GBMC. Cynthia L. H. Crawley, president of the Women's Hospital board, said it has contributed $7.8 million to GBMC since 1987.The other hospital that merged to form GBMC was the Presbyterian Eye, Ear and Throat Charitable Hospital.
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