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Women S History Month

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NEWS
February 23, 1997
Western Maryland College will sponsor activities throughout next month in recognition of Women's History Month, including a presentation by a young woman whose HIV infection has progressed to acquired immune deficiency syndrome."
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Maryland has museums devoted to African Americans, artists, war veterans and sports legends. Starting this spring, it will have a center devoted to more than half the state's adult population: women. When the Maryland Women's Heritage Center and Museum opens in downtown Baltimore, planners say, it will be the first of its kind in the nation - a community forum that will recognize stories of achievement by Maryland women - from Harriet Tubman to Rachel Carson to Marin Alsop.
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NEWS
January 10, 2010
Howard County's Commission for Women invites students, including public, private or home-schooled, in grades 6-12 to participate in its essay contest in honor of Women's History Month. This year's theme is "Writing Women Back into History." Deadline is Jan. 20. Essays should be e-mailed to women@howardcountymd.gov or mailed to the Commission for Women Student Essay Contest, 6751 Columbia Gateway Drive, Suite 300, Columbia 21046. First-place winners will receive a $200 U.S. Savings Bond and be invited to read their essays at the Women's Hall of Fame induction ceremony on March 11 at Howard Community College.
NEWS
January 10, 2010
Howard County's Commission for Women invites students, including public, private or home-schooled, in grades 6-12 to participate in its essay contest in honor of Women's History Month. This year's theme is "Writing Women Back into History." Deadline is Jan. 20. Essays should be e-mailed to women@howardcountymd.gov or mailed to the Commission for Women Student Essay Contest, 6751 Columbia Gateway Drive, Suite 300, Columbia 21046. First-place winners will receive a $200 U.S. Savings Bond and be invited to read their essays at the Women's Hall of Fame induction ceremony on March 11 at Howard Community College.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
When it comes to celebrating the role of women in American history, the best book to come out recently is "American Women: Their Lives in Their Words" by Doreen Rappaport (HarperTrophy paperback, $6.95, ages 12 and up).Of course, there's not much competition.March is Women's History Month, which hasn't yet sparked the glut of new books that precedes Black History Month. Publishers are beginning to fill the vacuum, however, and here's hoping that they will follow the lead of Ms. Rappaport's excellent non-fiction compilation.
FEATURES
March 15, 1999
March is National Women's History Month -- but does that meant it's just a girl thing? Of course not! The Yak thinks it's a great time for everyone to salute the achievements of women. One great woman in history was Elizabeth "Lizzie" Stanton.Women haven't always had the same rights as men. When the United States was founded more than 200 years ago, women couldn't own property. In fact, women were considered the property of their fathers or husbands. And women couldn't vote.But in the mid-1800s, a group of women -- including Lizzie -- decided they wanted to have the same rights as men, including the right to vote.
FEATURES
By Wil S. Hylton and Wil S. Hylton,Staff Writer | March 2, 1992
Cindy Gail Konits' pictures make viewers think twice about sexual stereotypes.On display at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, her exhibit of 40 black and white photographs depicts 23 working women in fields historically dominated by men. The show, "The Best Woman for the Job," introduces women in fields such as construction, railroad engineering and steelworking, which the photographer hopes will expose viewers to non-traditional career options for women...
NEWS
March 8, 1994
MARCH is Women's History Month and, since statistics help form the raw material of history, the Census Bureau has summarized some pertinent data about women in the United States:Population: In 1990, there were 127.5 million women in the nation, 51 percent of the U.S. population. The women's population in 1994 is projected to be 133.4 million. Overall, women outnumbered men by 6 million in 1990.There were equal numbers of men and women aged 25 to 34. More men than women are born each year, but because men always have higher death rates during the young adult years, the ratio begins to even out.Business: The growth rate of women-owned businesses was more than four times greater than the rate for all businesses from 1982 to 1987.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
But for her sweater and a morning meeting that took her from her Pentagon office to another room in the sprawling building Sept. 11, Lt. Col. Marilyn Wills wouldn't be here today. The meeting started minutes before her desk was engulfed in flames. The sweater, soaked from the sprinklers, provided water as Wills and her co-workers sucked on its fibers as they groped for an exit through the smoke. Wills led the procession to a window on the second floor, where they jumped to safety. Wills, the Army personnel chief's liaison to Congress, won the Soldier's Medal for her valor that day. But the mother of two from Prince George's County insists the real heroes are those fighting in Afghanistan.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
When it comes to vivid teaching tools, Carolyn Stegman finds it hard to beat an old classic: the thick history text she was given as a junior high school student three decades ago."It has all the tragic events -- the wars and the famine and the settling of the West," said Stegman, an adjunct professor at Salisbury State University.But when Stegman reaches for the book, it's to show her students what isn't recorded in the 400 densely worded pages. Tucked in between profiles of legendary characters and heroic tales are only a few short paragraphs chronicling the contributions of American women.
NEWS
February 15, 2004
The Commission for Women will hold its 20th annual Women's History Month Luncheon from 12:15 p.m. to 3 p.m. March 7 at Richlin Ballroom, 1700 Van Bibber Road, Edgewood. Harford County District Judges Mimi R. Cooper and Angela M. Eaves will present "Through the Eyes of Her Honors," a discussion of the District Court of Maryland and its agencies. Tickets for the luncheon, which includes a hot buffet, are $22 and must be purchased by Feb. 23. Information: 410-638-3117.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 28, 2002
You go, girls! March is nearly over and so is Women's History Month, but hang on. The celebration of women's past and current contributions to society continues. In a program this weekend, Barnes & Noble in Towson looks not to the past but to the future, showing girls who they can grow up to be. Called "Women of the Future," the event features a panel of local women engineers who will talk about their experiences in a traditionally male-dominated career field and the options they've found within it. The book You Can Be a Woman Engineer by Judith Love Cohen will be used as a general guide and launching point, and other books from the You Can Be a Woman ... series will be on hand to inspire young minds.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
But for her sweater and a morning meeting that took her from her Pentagon office to another room in the sprawling building Sept. 11, Lt. Col. Marilyn Wills wouldn't be here today. The meeting started minutes before her desk was engulfed in flames. The sweater, soaked from the sprinklers, provided water as Wills and her co-workers sucked on its fibers as they groped for an exit through the smoke. Wills led the procession to a window on the second floor, where they jumped to safety. Wills, the Army personnel chief's liaison to Congress, won the Soldier's Medal for her valor that day. But the mother of two from Prince George's County insists the real heroes are those fighting in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
But for her sweater and a morning meeting that took her from her Pentagon office to another room in the sprawling building Sept. 11, Lt. Col. Marilyn Wills wouldn't be here today. The meeting started minutes before her desk was engulfed in flames. The sweater, soaked from the sprinklers, provided water as Wills and her co-workers sucked on its fibers as they groped for an exit through the smoke. Wills led the procession to a window on the second floor, where they jumped to safety. Wills, the Army personnel chief's liaison to Congress, won the Soldier's Medal for her valor that day. But the mother of two from Prince George's County insists the real heroes are those fighting in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 21, 1999
BOSTON -- On the whole, I do prefer history-in-the-making. So I tip my hat to Elizabeth Dole as she places each foot ever so carefully on the runway to the title of "First Serious Female Contender for the Presidency."Announcing her "exploratory committee" this month, Ms. Dole looked like the perfect focus group candidate: competent, competitive and compassionate.Against the macho soundtrack from "Top Gun" she did a female-friendly Oprah impression. Despite a resume of jobs in five administrations, she assured us that she wasn't a politician.
FEATURES
March 15, 1999
March is National Women's History Month -- but does that meant it's just a girl thing? Of course not! The Yak thinks it's a great time for everyone to salute the achievements of women. One great woman in history was Elizabeth "Lizzie" Stanton.Women haven't always had the same rights as men. When the United States was founded more than 200 years ago, women couldn't own property. In fact, women were considered the property of their fathers or husbands. And women couldn't vote.But in the mid-1800s, a group of women -- including Lizzie -- decided they wanted to have the same rights as men, including the right to vote.
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