Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWomen S History
IN THE NEWS

Women S History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Elaine Hedges, the founder and coordinator of the Women's Studies program at Towson State University and an English professor for more than 20 years, died of undetermined causes June 5 at Sinai Hospital. She was 69 and lived in Roland Park.Dr. Hedges, who retired last year, was nationally known as an authority on women's history and women's studies. She wrote or edited 12 books and wrote scores of articles related to women. Her writings were used in college classrooms nationwide."She was a truly profound and reputable scholar in a field that was criticized about not being serious about real scholarship," said Clarinda Harris, a longtime friend who chairs the English Department at Towson State.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By MECHELLE VOEPEL and MECHELLE VOEPEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | April 7, 2006
BOSTON -- The WNBA draft came soon after the NCAA women's championship game -- a little too soon, perhaps, for three Duke players still agonizing over their 78-75 overtime loss to Maryland on Tuesday. Wednesday afternoon, Duke's Monique Currie went No. 3 in the draft, while teammates Mistie Williams (second round) and Jessica Foley (third round) were selected, too. Three other first-round picks were from teams that also felt the sting of Final Four defeat: No. 1 selection Seimone Augustus of LSU, No. 9 La'Tangela Atkinson of North Carolina and No. 14 Scholanda Hoston of LSU. Also taken among the 14 players in the first round were four whose seasons ended in the Elite Eight and three who made it as far as the Sweet 16. And what college team was totally absent from the draft?
Advertisement
NEWS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Staff writer | March 28, 1991
It's National Women's History Month, and appropriately, seniors in Brooklyn Park are talking about Rosa Parks. They're also discussing Marion Anderson and other women who have made their indelible mark on America.The catalyst for all this conversation is what Kathy White, satellite coordinator for the Anne Arundel County Department of Aging, calls "an impromptu little history program (about) women."White started the Women's History Program about three months ago as one of many activities offered by the Department of Aging at the Brooklyn Park Library, and the discussions have been going on since.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
SILENTS AT THE CREATIVE ALLIANCE -- "Silent Sounds," a series of vintage silent films shown with live musical accompaniment, kicks off at the Creative Alliance tonight with Frank Peregini's Scar of Shame (1927), a drama that examines the role of social class within the African-American community. The film was the first produced by the Colored Players Film Corp. of Philadelphia. Saxophonist and band leader Carl Grubbs will perform his jazz-inspired score for the film. Showtime is 8 p.m. at the old Patterson Theatre, 3134 Eastern Ave. in Highlandtown.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
SILENTS AT THE CREATIVE ALLIANCE -- "Silent Sounds," a series of vintage silent films shown with live musical accompaniment, kicks off at the Creative Alliance tonight with Frank Peregini's Scar of Shame (1927), a drama that examines the role of social class within the African-American community. The film was the first produced by the Colored Players Film Corp. of Philadelphia. Saxophonist and band leader Carl Grubbs will perform his jazz-inspired score for the film. Showtime is 8 p.m. at the old Patterson Theatre, 3134 Eastern Ave. in Highlandtown.
SPORTS
By MECHELLE VOEPEL and MECHELLE VOEPEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | April 7, 2006
BOSTON -- The WNBA draft came soon after the NCAA women's championship game -- a little too soon, perhaps, for three Duke players still agonizing over their 78-75 overtime loss to Maryland on Tuesday. Wednesday afternoon, Duke's Monique Currie went No. 3 in the draft, while teammates Mistie Williams (second round) and Jessica Foley (third round) were selected, too. Three other first-round picks were from teams that also felt the sting of Final Four defeat: No. 1 selection Seimone Augustus of LSU, No. 9 La'Tangela Atkinson of North Carolina and No. 14 Scholanda Hoston of LSU. Also taken among the 14 players in the first round were four whose seasons ended in the Elite Eight and three who made it as far as the Sweet 16. And what college team was totally absent from the draft?
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | December 9, 1991
IT WASN'T that long ago when a woman who chose to join the military had to be unmarried. If she had children, she essentially had to sign them over to a legal guardian. And thoughts of being "top gun" were pure fantasy. If she was a member of a racial minority, her opportunities were even more limited.Such revelations tax the imaginations of young people in her classes at Anne Arundel Community College, says RitaVictoria Gomez, a teacher and historian who is also a major in the Air Force reserves.
NEWS
March 21, 1999
March is National Women's History Month, which honors the contributions of women throughout American history.Here are some reading suggestions for you and your child.Books with a twist"Tatterhood and Other Tales," edited by Ethel J. Phelps"Sammy Keyes and the Sisters of Mercy," by Wendelin Van Draanen"Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella," by Daniel San SouciGirl-powered books"Matilda," by Roald Dahl"Harriet the Spy," by Louise Fitzhugh"Mrs. Piggle Wiggle," by Betty MacDonald"The Great Gilly Hopkins," by Katherine Paterson"Sadako and the Thou- sand Paper Cranes," by Eleanor Coerr"The Courage of Sarah Noble," by Alice Dalgliesh"Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind," by Suzanne Fisher StaplesFiction"Her Stories: African American Folktales, Fairytales, and True Tales," told by Virginia Hamilton"Seven Brave Women," by Betsy Hearne"Bloomers!"
SPORTS
By Jeff Goldberg and Jeff Goldberg,THE HARTFORD COURANT | March 30, 2004
HARTFORD, Conn. - Connecticut now stands alone in women's college basketball history. The Huskies reached an unprecedented fifth consecutive Final Four last night with a 66-49 victory over Penn State in the NCAA tournament East Regional final at the Civic Center. The streak started in Philadelphia with the 2000 championship. It was a crowning moment for senior Diana Taurasi, one of the best to ever play the women's game. The East Regional's Most Outstanding Player scored 27 points, including six in a 9-0 run that helped the second-seeded Huskies (29-4)
NEWS
March 25, 2001
Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen resuscitates Maryland's female historical figures. For children, reading about the lives of famous people can be a good bridge between historical fiction and informational books. Biographies can breathe life into historical facts and dates. March is Women's History Month, so it is an excellent time to read biographies about famous women. The Maryland State Department of Education's Women's History Project exists to make us all aware of the contributions of diverse women throughout our state's history, in the hope that it would inspire present-day dreams and future accomplishments.
SPORTS
By Jeff Goldberg and Jeff Goldberg,THE HARTFORD COURANT | March 30, 2004
HARTFORD, Conn. - Connecticut now stands alone in women's college basketball history. The Huskies reached an unprecedented fifth consecutive Final Four last night with a 66-49 victory over Penn State in the NCAA tournament East Regional final at the Civic Center. The streak started in Philadelphia with the 2000 championship. It was a crowning moment for senior Diana Taurasi, one of the best to ever play the women's game. The East Regional's Most Outstanding Player scored 27 points, including six in a 9-0 run that helped the second-seeded Huskies (29-4)
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
In Ellicott City, where the past is regularly documented with exhibits, events and "living history" participants in period dress, a new walking tour reveals some overlooked workers, property owners and entrepreneurs - all of them women. "I'm a little more interested in the ladies," said Adele Air, historic sites programs coordinator for the county Department of Recreation and Parks and leader of the tour. "They don't get recognition off the bat." Air has offered the Women of Ellicott Mills tour - which uses the town's former name - since March.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
Jennifer Weeks Sekowski of Forest Hill has accomplished what few have by their early 30s: She has made breakthrough discoveries in science, won numerous awards and has a loving family. And because of her many accomplishments, she has been selected to be a speaker at the 19th annual Women's History Month luncheon March 2 in Edgewood. "I feel really blessed," she said. "I've been able to accomplish everything that I wanted." It was at college that her interest in science flourished. She attended University of Pennsylvania, where she studied neuroscience and did some research.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 3, 2002
Every so often a show comes along that makes you remember why art is such a vital part of the human experience. The big Judy Chicago retrospective at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington is such a show. If you see nothing else this season, don't miss this one. Chicago almost single-handedly invented feminist art in the 1970s; before her, there were plenty of women artists, but they were stuck in the same situation as women pianists then, for whom the highest praise was the backhanded compliment, "She plays like a man."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Owens and Donna Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2002
They are women you know, or should know. Women of courage, intelligence, vision - "she-roes" who have broken ground and, occasionally, the rules, to make this world a better - or at least more interesting - place. We celebrate their achievements throughout March - National Women's History Month. The seed for the celebration was planted back in 1978, when a group of teachers in Sonoma County, Calif., set aside a week to recognize women's history. Three years later, Barbara Mikulski (then a Maryland congresswoman)
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2002
Ruth Levy, who turns 80 today, has a "very fine recollection of Baltimore." She grew up in Reservoir Hill, on a block of Whitelock Street since razed. But her memories can still take you door to door of the "intensely Jewish neighborhood" where she once went on foot, collecting payments for her father Albert Surosky, a kosher butcher. The 900 block of Whitelock Street, chock-full of dairy stores, groceries, cleaners, bakeries, a barbershop and drugstore, was a place "to exchange gossip and to shop," Levy says.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | March 19, 2000
Less than a century ago, there was opposition to women's suffrage, and women in the workplace were highly criticized. During the 20th century, women have made great strides, often in the face of frustration and adversity. In March, we celebrate Women's History Month to honor the courage, commitment and camaraderie of women from all eras who have a made a difference. The National Women's History Project is the nonprofit group responsible for the declaration of March as Women's History Month.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2001
It's women's history month and Frances Hughes Glendening is maintaining a public schedule so hectic that both she and her aide are hoarse with colds. Neither her slight cough nor her full-time job as a lawyer at the Federal Election Commission has slowed her dizzying lineup of talks and receptions and readings to kids in libraries across the state. And neither has the fact that she and her husband, Gov. Parris N. Glendening, have been separated since July, making her the first first lady to carry on the role without a chief executive by her side.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and By Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
They have sailed the world many times over, charmed presidents and popes, rescued wounded men and cheated the deadliest tropical diseases. During World War II, Army nurses Helen Blotzer, Dorothy Davis, Agnes Sweeney and Eda Teague burrowed in foxholes, crawled through hostile turf, bathed from their helmets. All the while they wore brave faces as enemies attacked and baby-faced Americans cried in their arms. It was an adventure. And when it ended, they reverted to traditional roles, becoming military wives.
NEWS
March 25, 2001
Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen resuscitates Maryland's female historical figures. For children, reading about the lives of famous people can be a good bridge between historical fiction and informational books. Biographies can breathe life into historical facts and dates. March is Women's History Month, so it is an excellent time to read biographies about famous women. The Maryland State Department of Education's Women's History Project exists to make us all aware of the contributions of diverse women throughout our state's history, in the hope that it would inspire present-day dreams and future accomplishments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.