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By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | May 13, 2001
Posing for the cameras is nothing new to celebrities, but truly candid shots at home are rare. In a new book, Hollywood insider and amateur photographer Joyce Ostin captures famous mothers and daughters in unguarded moments of affection. There's Madonna getting a hug from her dark-haired daughter, Lourdes; Jennifer Lopez being sweetly pecked on the cheek by mom Guadelupe. And Olivia Newton-John hamming it up with her daughter, Chloe Lattanzi. "Hollywood Moms" (Harry N. Abrams, $29.95)
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 19, 2012
Update: The American Chemistry Council disputes the study. Here is a statement: “It is concerning that the authors could be over-interpreting their results and unnecessarily alarm workers. This study included no data showing if there was actual chemical exposure, from what chemicals, at what levels, and over what period of time in any particular workplace. Although this is an important area of research, these findings are inconsistent with other research. This study should not be used to draw any conclusions about the cause of cancer patterns in workers.”  The original blog post is below: Women who worked ten years or more in jobs that exosed them to cancer-causing substances and endocrine chemicals increased their odds of getting breast cancer, a new study has found.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
Saturday marks the seventh annual National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and the NAACP is hosting a public lunch and panel discussion at Coppin State University . The day is coordinated nationally by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health . It aims to raise awareness about impact the epidemic is having on women and girls. The forum is open to the public and there are still tickets available. They can be reserved here .  It runs from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Coppin's Physical Education Complex & Multipurpose Gym, 2523 Gwynns Falls Parkway in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
Saturday marks the seventh annual National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and the NAACP is hosting a public lunch and panel discussion at Coppin State University . The day is coordinated nationally by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health . It aims to raise awareness about impact the epidemic is having on women and girls. The forum is open to the public and there are still tickets available. They can be reserved here .  It runs from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Coppin's Physical Education Complex & Multipurpose Gym, 2523 Gwynns Falls Parkway in Baltimore.
NEWS
By K Kaufmann and K Kaufmann,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
Ask Kathy Rogers why she started a fund to help women pay for abortions, and she will tell you stories of low-wage women with no health insurance who can't afford $25 a month for birth control. So Rogers, director of Seneca Women's Health Care in Baltimore, started asking friends for money to help low-income women pay for abortions. In 2001, the Seneca Women's Health Fund was created. Rogers will represent the fund at the March for Women's Lives in Washington on Sunday as part of a contingent from the National Network of Abortion Funds, an organization of 98 groups that, like Seneca, help low-income women pay for abortions.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Connie Hewitt was surprised to learn that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. For the past five years, Hewitt has been a volunteer for a women's health conference held by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. After learning that she had nine of 10 common risk factors for heart disease at last year's conference, she lost 45 pounds and started exercising regularly and eating a more healthful diet. Yesterday, Hewitt -- along with nearly 1,000 other women -- attended "A Woman's Journey," Hopkins' 13th annual conference focusing on women's health issues.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 7, 1992
Medical researchers in Baltimore are launching what is considered the most extensive study ever attempted into the effects of aging on women's health.The five-year study, which will involve 1,000 women 65 and over in Baltimore and Baltimore County, will try to determine which chronic illnesses are most responsible for causing disabilities as women age, and how disabilities can be lessened or prevented.The diseases include arthritis, heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes and hearing and vision impairments.
FEATURES
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | June 9, 1993
Alexandra Penney's first book about making love, published 11 years ago, did not even breathe the word condom."How to Make Love to a Man," based on interviews with men about what they wanted sexually and emotionally from women, sold a million and a half copies."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | September 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers seeking health care equity for women said yesterday that President Clinton's reform proposal represents a step forward but worry that his failure to make a clear commitment to abortion coverage may lead to a retreat on that key issue.The president's plan would give many women coverage for Pap smears, mammograms, prenatal services, routine exams and other preventive services for the first time, though some advocates complain the coverage would still fall short of what most doctors recommend.
NEWS
March 7, 2001
The Wilde Lake Community Association is seeking candidates for five seats on the village board and one seat on the Columbia Council. Positions are for a one-year term, beginning May 1. Nominations will be accepted through March 16. Nomination packets are available at Slayton House in Wilde Lake Village Green. Information: 410-730-3987. Women's health subject of Town Center programs The Town Center Community Association and Historic Oakland will present Women's Night Out - three programs on women's health and nurturing - from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. March 16, 23 and 30 at Historic Oakland, 5430 Vantage Point Road.
NEWS
September 13, 2009
Plan wouldn't fund abortion After a month of right-wing activists employing every scare tactic imaginable at congressional town hall meetings on health reform, columnist Kathleen Parker falsely claimed that health care reform would lead to federally funded abortions ("Abortion issue could thwart Obama's health reform goals," Sept. 9). The truth is that advocates for women's health care, including Planned Parenthood, are focused on achieving affordable, quality health care for all and ensuring that women's broad health needs are met through reform.
NEWS
August 28, 2008
Entries sought for Art Bras Challenge The Anne Arundel County Department of Health and the Annapolis Quilt Guild are accepting entries for the fourth annual Cup of the Month Challenge. Contestants will create Art Bras, decorated bras that inspire and support breast cancer awareness, screening and treatment. Entry forms and contest rules are available on the Department of Health Web site, www.aahealth.org. Under Hot Topics, click Cup of the Month Bra Art Challenge. There is no cost to enter, but bras must be submitted by Sept.
FEATURES
July 24, 2008
* Dr. Carole Miller is the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's National Woman of the Year. Miller, a nationally recognized expert in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma and director of the St. Agnes Cancer Center, was among 195 candidates for the title, which is given to the person who raises the most money for the society. Miller raised more than $122,000, a Maryland chapter record, and $40,000 more than the runner-up. She used a variety of grass-roots strategies for her fundraising campaign, including letter-writing, basket bingo, a casino night and a silent auction.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | December 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Saudi King Abdullah's pardon of the "Qatif girl" - who was gang-raped and then sentenced to 200 lashes and six months imprisonment for "improper mingling" - is welcome news. With something less than gratitude, Westerners are nonetheless relieved. It seems obvious that the king's decision was influenced in part by pressures both from the international community, including the United States, and within Saudi Arabia, where some writers and others bravely expressed outrage and embarrassment.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Connie Hewitt was surprised to learn that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. For the past five years, Hewitt has been a volunteer for a women's health conference held by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. After learning that she had nine of 10 common risk factors for heart disease at last year's conference, she lost 45 pounds and started exercising regularly and eating a more healthful diet. Yesterday, Hewitt -- along with nearly 1,000 other women -- attended "A Woman's Journey," Hopkins' 13th annual conference focusing on women's health issues.
NEWS
By Stephen Smith and Stephen Smith,New York Times News Service | April 6, 2007
A 2002 study that led millions of women to throw out their hormone pills may have overestimated the dangers of that medication to women in their 50s, new research suggests. The new study in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association found that for women near the start of menopause, the pills do not increase the incidence of heart attacks or other cardiac complications. Findings regarding stroke were less clear cut, but researchers said that the youngest women appeared to be at the lowest risk.
NEWS
July 12, 2002
PHONES ARE ringing off the hook at doctors' offices throughout the nation as women hear the latest news from the menopause front. For years, they'd been told that taking drugs to replace the hormones that disappear with age would help them feel better, stay healthier and maybe live longer. Now they learn that for some women those pills may be doing more harm than good. So, what should they do? The answer seems to be: Don't panic. But women taking the drugs should carefully re-evaluate their own risk and reward factors.
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
The Upper Chesapeake Cardiovascular Institute launched a heart disease awareness campaign yesterday to alert women of Harford County to the dangers of heart disease. Women's Heart Plus, a program intended to raise awareness of the risks and symptoms of heart disease in women, came about after women in Harford County were surveyed about their knowledge of heart disease and the institute realized how many were uninformed on the subject, said Kim Lovett, spokeswoman for Upper Chesapeake Health System.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | February 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When President Bush nominated Ellen R. Sauerbrey for a top State Department post last fall, outside advocacy groups waged an extended - and ultimately unsuccessful - fight to keep her from getting the job. Now that she's in it, those critics are changing their tune about the outspoken conservative Republican from Maryland. "The bottom line is, our initial impressions are good," said Kenneth H. Bacon, president of Refugees International, who met recently with Sauerbrey, at her request.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
If practice makes perfect, the Food and Drug Administration may finally be on its way to regaining confidence in its ability to protect public safety. The conflict-ridden agency - both shill for the pharmaceutical industry and stooge for White House political shop - can hardly afford any more steps backward. In naming veteran FDA official Kathleen Uhl to head the office of women's health, the Bush administration has at least met what would seem to be the minimum requirements for the post: She is a woman and a physician.
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