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By Mona Charen | October 29, 1992
AS a woman, I can hardly wait for the Year of the Woman to be history -- and I bet I'm not the only female who feels that way. The claptrap meter on this issue has been in the danger zone for too long.George Bush was said to have "outraged women's groups" (notice how those three words seldom go out separately?) by muttering, during a discussion about women candidates in one of the debates, "I hope most of them lose." Some press reports treated his remark as a "gaffe." How so? President Bush is, at least nominally, a Republican.
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NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A coalition of liberal women's groups wants the White House to withdraw the nomination of Ellen R. Sauerbrey to the top refugee post at the State Department, saying the former Maryland lawmaker and two-time Republican gubernatorial candidate is "utterly unqualified" for the job. President Bush tapped Sauerbrey last month to be assistant secretary of state for population, refugees and migration. Refugees International, an advocacy group, immediately condemned the choice, saying she lacks experience dealing with refugees or in coordinating responses to humanitarian emergencies.
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NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
For more than two decades, Fahima Vorgetts has dreamed of going home. But now, as the Annapolis business owner prepares for her first trip back to Afghanistan since she fled the war-torn country in 1979, she braces for the worst. "I have been warned that the country is so devastated and most of the people I knew are gone or killed," she says. "I have been told that I will be heartbroken, and I am prepared for that." Vorgetts, 47, leaves today for a five-week trip that will take her into the midst of the suffering people of her homeland.
NEWS
By Laurence Iliff and Laurence Iliff,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 2, 2005
MEXICO CITY -- Showing some skin to reach Mexico's macho consumers isn't new. Women sell everything from tools to beer. But the use of a Playboy model in ads to protect sea turtles has put one U.S. ecology group in the middle of a feminist flap. In one poster, Argentine model Dorismar poses provocatively as three turtles scoot along a Mexican beach. "My man doesn't need turtle eggs," says the text. "Because he knows they don't make him more potent." The "sexy campaign," as the San Diego-based group Wildcoast calls it, is designed to stop Mexican men from consuming raw turtle eggs that have been illegally marketed as an aphrodisiac.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
For more than two decades, Fahima Vorgetts has dreamed of going home. But now, as the Annapolis business owner prepares for her first trip back to Afghanistan since she fled the war-torn country in 1979, she braces for the worst. "I have been warned that the country is so devastated, and most of the people I knew are gone or killed," she says. "I have been told that I will be heartbroken, and I am prepared for that." Vorgetts, 47, leaves today for a five-week trip that will take her into the midst of the suffering people of her homeland.
NEWS
By Donna St. George and Donna St. George,Knight-Ridder News Service Staff writer Michael Dresser contributed to this article | November 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If Bob Packwood worked for Amoco when 28 female associates accused him of groping and French-kissing them, his boss might have fired him by now. If he worked for CNN, he might be out the door. Likewise at Southwest Airlines.But, of course, Mr. Packwood is no ordinary citizen. He is a powerful senator in Washington. And when he was accused of sexual misconduct, corporate America did not react with even a glimmer of the harshness that its own rules suggest.Instead, chief executives and Washington lobbyists delivered cash to the accused senator -- thousands and thousands of dollars of it.Officials of at least 15 corporations have written big-dollar checks to help the Oregon Republican save his political life.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | December 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Determined to make President-elect Bil Clinton live up to his pledge to have an "administration that looks like America," women's groups are lobbying hard to have women named to jobs historically held by men.In his first personnel announcements yesterday Mr. Clinton designated Alice M. Rivlin, former head of the Congressional Budget Office, to be deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget.Although that's a senior position, it's not the top post in the budget agency and would not satisfy the desires of women's groups to see women named to leading economic posts.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush pledged yesterday to help heal a nation rubbed raw by the divisive Clarence Thomas hearings, even as he berated civil rights and women's groups who opposed his Supreme Court nominee.Mr. Bush said he was "troubled" by the "graphic sex" discussed on the televised Senate committee hearings, concluding that the senators should have heard the sexual harassment allegations in a closed-door session.The president added, however, that some good could emerge from airing Anita F. Hill's accusations against Justice-designate Thomas: an increased national sensitivity to the issue of sexual harassment.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1998
Moving to better protect battered women, the General Assembly agreed last night to change Maryland's restrictive divorce law to make it easier to get out of abusive marriages.The long-sought measure, approved barely an hour before adjournment, would allow victims of marital abuse to file for divorce without first waiting a year.Despite appeals by women's groups -- and widespread support among lawmakers -- the proposal ran into a major obstacle when Senate traditionalists moved to let judges require that couples make good-faith efforts to reconcile.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A coalition of liberal women's groups wants the White House to withdraw the nomination of Ellen R. Sauerbrey to the top refugee post at the State Department, saying the former Maryland lawmaker and two-time Republican gubernatorial candidate is "utterly unqualified" for the job. President Bush tapped Sauerbrey last month to be assistant secretary of state for population, refugees and migration. Refugees International, an advocacy group, immediately condemned the choice, saying she lacks experience dealing with refugees or in coordinating responses to humanitarian emergencies.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | September 16, 2003
IT MIGHT COST me my feminist membership card, but if I were a California resident, I'd vote for Arnold Schwarzenegger for governor - even if I'd have to wait a few more months to do so. The big news yesterday, of course, was a ruling by a federal court in San Francisco that the recall/replacement election should be put off until some problems with the state's voting technology are addressed. But the timing of the election is not exactly Arnold's biggest worry right now. Instead, it's that his raunchy remarks about sex and women have apparently widened the gender gap that already exists among California voters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Griffith-Thompson and Jean Griffith-Thompson,Sun Staff | June 22, 2003
Open Wide the Freedom Gates: A Memoir, by Dorothy Height. Public Affairs. 352 pages. $ 26. She walked the walk. Long before civil rights became a movement, and Dorothy Height established herself as a mother of freedom. Her influence continues to be felt well beyond the circles of women's groups and power structures that she helped build. Now 91, Height has been a YWCA stalwart; the heartbeat of the National Council for Negro Women; a founder of the national Black Family Reunion celebrations; a friend of first ladies.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
For more than two decades, Fahima Vorgetts has dreamed of going home. But now, as the Annapolis business owner prepares for her first trip back to Afghanistan since she fled the war-torn country in 1979, she braces for the worst. "I have been warned that the country is so devastated and most of the people I knew are gone or killed," she says. "I have been told that I will be heartbroken, and I am prepared for that." Vorgetts, 47, leaves today for a five-week trip that will take her into the midst of the suffering people of her homeland.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
For more than two decades, Fahima Vorgetts has dreamed of going home. But now, as the Annapolis business owner prepares for her first trip back to Afghanistan since she fled the war-torn country in 1979, she braces for the worst. "I have been warned that the country is so devastated, and most of the people I knew are gone or killed," she says. "I have been told that I will be heartbroken, and I am prepared for that." Vorgetts, 47, leaves today for a five-week trip that will take her into the midst of the suffering people of her homeland.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
For more than two decades, Fahima Vorgetts has dreamed of going home. But now, as the Annapolis business owner prepares for her first trip back to Afghanistan since she fled the war-torn country in 1979, she braces for the worst. "I have been warned that the country is so devastated and most of the people I knew are gone or killed," she says. "I have been told that I will be heartbroken, and I am prepared for that." Vorgetts, 47, leaves today for a five-week trip that will take her into the midst of the suffering people of her homeland.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - With women's rights advocates calling on President Bush to ensure that any new government in Afghanistan restores and guarantees the rights of women, the White House is embarking on a new offensive to highlight the repressive treatment of women by the crumbling Taliban regime. In remarks to schoolchildren in Crawford, Texas, yesterday, Bush spoke of his "keen desire to free the women of Afghanistan" and called the Taliban "the most repressive, backward group of people we have seen on the face of the Earth in a long period of time, including and particularly how they treat women."
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | August 29, 1995
Despite the depth and breadth of their expertise, U.S. delegates will go to next week's Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing empty-handed in one key respect: They represent the only industrialized democracy that has not ratified a United Nations treaty on ending discrimination against women.In the 16 years since it was approved by the United Nations, the treaty has been ratified by 144 countries. But in the U.S. Senate, a floor vote has yet to be taken.That non-action, women's groups fear, may undermine the United States' credibility in negotiations at the conference, particularly on sensitive questions of human rights.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
State Sen. Mary H. Boergers' chances of winning the Democratic primary for governor rest partly on a hope that voters will choose the only candidate who isn't a white guy in a tie.Ms. Boergers, who officially launches her campaign today, clearly wants her candidacy to capitalize on what makes her different from her two principal opponents.A two-term state delegate and first-term senator from Montgomery County, Ms. Boergers is not an entrenched member of the state party hierarchy. That description certainly fits Lt. Gov. Melvin A. Steinberg and Prince George's County Executive Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 5, 2001
WASHINGTON - In her debut days in Washington nearly three decades ago, a young, politically ambitious Democrat named Linda Chavez worked for one of the Senate's most liberal members and was herself so left of center that she and her husband belonged to a group called the Young People's Socialist League. But somewhere along her way to this week's nomination by President-elect George W. Bush to head the Labor Department, Chavez - inspired by Ronald Reagan and a growing sense that affirmative action and other nods to multicultural society did more harm than good - reversed allegiances.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
As their mothers chatted over lemon bars, young girls in spring dresses and polo shirts learned how easy it is -- and how hard -- to give away thousands of dollars. The money was just imaginary, part of an exercise to teach young women to start donating to charity. But 11-year-old Kendall Hoff still found it tough to choose. Animal rights or civil rights? Women's groups or low-income housing? She finally decided to give a little bit to each of her favorite causes. "We chose things because we thought it was what our community most needed," said Kendall, who donates half of her spending money to her church in Towson.
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