Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWomen S Game
IN THE NEWS

Women S Game

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
The scorebooks, newspapers and videotapes will indelibly record that the top-ranked Maryland women's basketball team dropped a heartbreaker and probably their No. 1 ranking to No. 2 Virginia on Tuesday night at Cole Field House.But the sellout crowd of 14,500 who packed the hot building to make history and see great basketball may have given a tip to Maryland coaches and athletic officials that this could be the start of something big for women's basketball in College Park."I always envisioned things like that because if you don't, it will never happen," said Maryland coach Chris Weller.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2008
When Cathy Reese started playing lacrosse at Maryland in 1995, there was no restraining line. Every player on the field could be in the scoring area. Now the Terrapins' coach, Reese is often met with amazement when she tells her players about her college days. "I tell them about how we didn't even have a restraining line and they're like, `What?' They can't believe it. They think it's the old dinosaur age, so long ago." The restraining line came to the women's game in 1998, Reese's senior year at Maryland, limiting each team to seven field players within 30 yards of the end line.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
In contrast to the NCAA men's tournament, where Maryland, Tulsa and Boston College have all crashed the party, Cinderella's invitation to the women's tournament has been lost in the mail.As the women's field, newly expanded this year from 48 teams to 64, approaches its regional semifinals tomorrow night, the last have had little chance to approach the first.All four of the top seeds have made the regionals in the East and Mideast brackets, and the top three seeds are still alive in the West and three of the top four seeds are active in the Midwest.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun reporter | May 17, 2008
Gary Gait loves a lacrosse challenge. Since his All-America days at Syracuse 20 years ago, Gait has made an indelible mark on the sport at every turn. He revolutionized the men's game with his stick skills and acrobatic attack moves, winning more than a dozen championships on the college, pro and international levels. In 1994, he brought that same innovation and creativity to the women's game as an assistant coach at Maryland, inspiring a style of play that fueled a record seven-year run as NCAA Division I champion.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 3, 1995
On the heels of last fall's groundbreaking "A Passion to Play" special, chronicling the progression of women's athletics, ABC Sports makes history again Sunday (1:30 p.m., Channel 2), when it airs the Virginia-North Carolina women's basketball game from Chapel Hill.Though CBS has aired the women's Final Four for 12 years and at least three regular-season games for the past three seasons, Sunday's game marks the first time that a network that doesn't carry the tournament has broadcast a women's game.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Milton Kent and Christian Ewell and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1999
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Six days ago, the Duke women's basketball team was the toast of its sport, summarily ending Tennessee's three-year reign atop women's basketball.But last night, 17,773 fans and a nationwide audience saw the Blue Devils go ablaze under the heat of top-ranked Purdue's blistering second-half performance that got the Boilermakers a 62-45 win in the national championship game.And the thing that seemed to catch Duke coach Gail Goestenkors by surprise was that the Blue Devils collapsed under the weight of the Purdue pressure after handling the vaunted Tennessee press.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
Tony DiCicco, still adjusting to life as a soccer guru, was patiently sharing his views on matters such as the future of the women's game, his famous players' strike over $2,000 a month and being dad to four sons instead of suitcase dweller. "Aren't you going to ask me about the convention?" he finally interjected from his home in Connecticut. Sure, coach. The National Soccer Coaches Association of America opens its 53rd convention in Baltimore today, and DiCicco will be in town -- as a coach apart.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Milton Kent and Christian Ewell and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- An idea long advocated by some may become reality, an ESPN executive said yesterday. Programming vice president Len DeLuca said earlier dates for the NCAA women's basketball tournament is one possibility for the network, whose seven-year contract to cover the event ends in 2002. "We're trying to offer the best possible platform," he said during a media briefing. Nothing has been discussed with the women's basketball committee, according to its chairman, Bernadette McGlade.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
Yesterday was a day of good news and bad news for Michigan State women's basketball coach Joanne McCallie. The Spartans (28-3), who won the Big Ten tournament after sharing the regular-season title, received a No. 1 seed when the NCAA tournament bracket was unveiled yesterday, a reward for the best season in the school's history. Two years ago, that would have meant that Michigan State would be at home for the first two rounds of tournament. However, in the new reality, the Spartans will have to hit the road for the first two rounds, opening in Minneapolis, rather than at home in East Lansing.
SPORTS
By MECHELLE VOEPEL and MECHELLE VOEPEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | April 7, 2006
BOSTON -- The WNBA draft came soon after the NCAA women's championship game -- a little too soon, perhaps, for three Duke players still agonizing over their 78-75 overtime loss to Maryland on Tuesday. Wednesday afternoon, Duke's Monique Currie went No. 3 in the draft, while teammates Mistie Williams (second round) and Jessica Foley (third round) were selected, too. Three other first-round picks were from teams that also felt the sting of Final Four defeat: No. 1 selection Seimone Augustus of LSU, No. 9 La'Tangela Atkinson of North Carolina and No. 14 Scholanda Hoston of LSU. Also taken among the 14 players in the first round were four whose seasons ended in the Elite Eight and three who made it as far as the Sweet 16. And what college team was totally absent from the draft?
NEWS
By Rosemary Faya Prola | March 31, 2008
It may be opening day for the Orioles, but I'm still enjoying my recent memories of the first and second rounds of the NCAA Women's Basketball Tournament at College Park. My husband and I had two reasons for attending. First, we are big fans of college sports, primarily our alma maters (the University of Maryland and the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana). It's not very often that you have a chance to attend the early rounds of a national tournament in your own backyard. But just as important for me is the fact that I played basketball at Maryland for a year in the late 1960s.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | March 22, 2007
No, it's not time to register the domain name firebrenda.com. Or for any talk shows, message boards or column inches to be filled with fire-breathing venom about the wrong direction the program has taken. That kind of talk is reserved for the Maryland men's basketball team, of course. National championships don't have the same currency they once did, we've learned. The honeymoon in the women's program seems safe from a premature end. Still, in the wake of that debacle Tuesday night at the Hartford Civic Center, it is appropriate to ask the question: What the hell was that?
SPORTS
By GARY LAMBRECHT | February 22, 2007
The television exposure of NCAA men's and women's lacrosse took another step forward yesterday, when the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network announced that it will televise 14 games in 2007, including all four quarterfinal contests in the men's tournament. Starting with Sunday's game between the visiting Towson men's team and Loyola at noon, followed by the women's game between Loyola and visiting Hofstra, MASN will show at least one game a week in March, including a men's-women's doubleheader pitting Syracuse against host Georgetown on March 10. Ten of the games will be shown live, including both men's quarterfinal events on May 19. The May 20 quarterfinals will be televised on a tape-delay basis.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN REPORTER | November 3, 2006
Sun reporter Milton Kent's prediction for the women's Sweet 16, by regional sites. Greensboro, N.C. 1. Maryland Defending champ has all the necessary parts to repeat. 2. Tennessee Even with Candace Parker, the Lady Vols are under the national radar. 3. Purdue New coach Sharon Versyp takes over a talented Boilermakers squad. 4. California Former Duke assistant Joanne Boyle is building a power at Berkeley. Fresno, Calif. 1. Stanford Candice Wiggins is ready to lead Cardinal return to prominence.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | June 10, 2006
You had to get up early to watch Michelle Wie in the second round of the LPGA Championship yesterday at Bulle Rock. She teed off before 8 a.m. The thousands of fans who came out were richly rewarded. Wie blasted long drives into the high blue sky, sank some birdie putts and finished with a 68 that could easily have been four strokes better. "She left a few shots out there, for sure. This isn't a terribly hard course for her. I could easily see her shooting a 63 or 64 in one of the weekend rounds," said her instructor, David Leadbetter, the renowned swing coach who has mostly tutored men's champions such as Nick Faldo and Ernie Els. Her round put her in position to compete for the championship - she finished second in this tournament a year ago - and also illustrated why many of the questions she seems to generate are irrelevant.
SPORTS
By MECHELLE VOEPEL and MECHELLE VOEPEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | April 7, 2006
BOSTON -- The WNBA draft came soon after the NCAA women's championship game -- a little too soon, perhaps, for three Duke players still agonizing over their 78-75 overtime loss to Maryland on Tuesday. Wednesday afternoon, Duke's Monique Currie went No. 3 in the draft, while teammates Mistie Williams (second round) and Jessica Foley (third round) were selected, too. Three other first-round picks were from teams that also felt the sting of Final Four defeat: No. 1 selection Seimone Augustus of LSU, No. 9 La'Tangela Atkinson of North Carolina and No. 14 Scholanda Hoston of LSU. Also taken among the 14 players in the first round were four whose seasons ended in the Elite Eight and three who made it as far as the Sweet 16. And what college team was totally absent from the draft?
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN REPORTER | November 3, 2006
Sun reporter Milton Kent's prediction for the women's Sweet 16, by regional sites. Greensboro, N.C. 1. Maryland Defending champ has all the necessary parts to repeat. 2. Tennessee Even with Candace Parker, the Lady Vols are under the national radar. 3. Purdue New coach Sharon Versyp takes over a talented Boilermakers squad. 4. California Former Duke assistant Joanne Boyle is building a power at Berkeley. Fresno, Calif. 1. Stanford Candice Wiggins is ready to lead Cardinal return to prominence.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 1, 1996
EMMITSBURG -- Amy Langville scored 14 of her game-high 19 points from the free-throw line to lead Mount St. Mary's to a 63-56 victory over American yesterday in a women's game at Knott Arena.The Mountaineers (3-4) held the Eagles (4-4) to 27 percent shooting to break their four-game losing streak. Ally Baker paced American with 15 points and 15 rebounds.Mount St. Mary's led 27-20 at halftime and never trailed in the second half. The Mount advantage grew to as many as 13 points at the 6:04 mark after Langville converted four consecutive free throws, including two on a technical foul assessed to American coach Jeff Thatcher.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | April 6, 2006
Boston -- The confetti was still fluttering to the arena floor when it became clear that the world of women's college basketball had just set foot into the future. We had a slight glimpse of it last season when unheralded Baylor injected some parity into the list of women's NCAA champions. But the Bears were one and done. The Maryland Terrapins, bolstered by a young lineup, a young coach and high schoolers lining up to play in College Park are poised for a reign that has no obvious end in sight.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 21, 2006
A couple schools of thought have emerged in the wake of Tennessee forward Candace Parker's two dunks in Sunday's first-round NCAA tournament win over Army. The first is that the dunks are the first step along the way toward women's basketball's being taken seriously by the casual American sports fan, with the second being that they really weren't dunks, but rather glorified layups. In the end, neither thought is really important. For that matter, neither were the dunks, especially for those who are true fans of the sport.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.