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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Ten years after Goucher College's world was turned upside down, most students at the former women's school don't give a second thought to its status as a coeducational college.But, a decade ago, their female predecessors carried signs saying "Better Dead Than Coed" and "Men Are Not The Answer."And the students hung black balloons at the college entrance in Towson when the board of directors voted overwhelmingly to end 100 years of a women-only tradition in 1986."There were a lot of tears when they made the decision," said Jenifer Mitchell Reed, Class of 1986.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
It has been a decade since Mary Pat Seurkamp arrived in Baltimore to become the first permanent lay president of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. "It doesn't seem possible 10 years have gone by," Seurkamp, 60, said from her office on the North Charles Street campus. "It has been so busy, but a good sort of busy." Seurkamp has presided over Notre Dame at a time when women's colleges across the country, and here in Maryland, have been admitting men, a move seen as necessary for survival.
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NEWS
By James L. Fisher | September 13, 1990
ARE women's colleges becoming extinct? Were the Mills College students -- and those at Goucher College and several others that have confronted the question of admitting men, right to protest so vigorously?of Education.
NEWS
By JASON SONG and JASON SONG,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
At Hood College in Frederick, men make up a quarter of the student body - a pretty small group, considering that they are credited with saving the place. Three years ago, Hood was a virtually all-women's college with a declining enrollment and such bleak finances that it was tapping its endowment to pay the bills. Hood had 1,700 students, including a handful of men who attended as commuters. The trustees decided to let male students live on campus for the first time in Hood's 112-year history, hoping they would boost enrollment and revitalize the college.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN FEELEY | July 1, 1992
"We had the experience and missed the meaning.'' This line from T. S. Eliot's ''Four Quartets'' always impelled me to reflection, lest I, too, miss the meaning. As I leave the presidency of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland after a 21-year tenure, I am taking time to contemplate the totality of my experience. I find that I've become, in Robert Frost's words, ''only more sure of all I thought was true.'' I have distilled these principles:* An institution whose mission is clear and which can communicate that mission vigorously will stand strong against prevailing winds.
NEWS
November 4, 2002
Women's schools remain strong and relevant The Sun's article "Hood opts to go fully coed" (Oct. 19) noted the decline in the number of women's colleges in our country. But missed in this article, as in many others like it, is the vitality of a great number of women's colleges. And ironically, Hood College's announcement came in the same week that the College of Notre Dame of Maryland approved a new mission statement affirming the college's commitment to the education of women as leaders.
NEWS
By Kathleen Feeley | August 6, 1991
THE LEGAL challenge to Virginia Military Institute to accept women has made thoughtful citizens reflect more deeply on the values of a single-sex education. The men-only decision is double-edged: It upholds the philosophy that different educational settings are important for our society; it deprives women of the very special advantages of V.M.I.Because this is a public institution, the argument is a bit sharper: Should public dollars pay for education not open to everyKathleenFeeleyone?The decision would be solidly in favor of diversity and equal access if there were a public institution of higher education for women in Virginia which would give them the same competitive edge, esprit de corps and excellent education that VMI. offers to men. A comparable institution for women would not necessarily be a military institution but one which would capitalize on the special gifts and understandings which women as a group possess.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | March 12, 1991
YOU NEVER know what will make people laugh.In my office I can count on the Ninja Turtle, the one with the button that says "I Read Banned Books," and the baby picture of my daughter that looks like Mao Tse-tung on an off day.But nothing has ever tickled people like the April issue of Playboy on my desk, the whoopie cushion of periodicals. Everyone giggles. Everyone wants to know why I am reading it. The big lie: for the articles.The truth: I am looking at pictures of naked women.L The pictorial is called "The Women of the Women's Colleges."
NEWS
May 26, 1992
"Women's colleges create the atmosphere that empowers women and inspires leadership," Sister Kathleen Feeley wrote in a letter to the editor last September. As president of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland for the past 21 years, Sister Kathleen has been in the forefront of making this statement a reality.On Saturday, Sister Kathleen presided over her last crop of graduates. She was also the commencement speaker for the 275 students who receive diplomas from the small liberal arts college in Homeland.
NEWS
September 15, 1992
WOMEN are making steady headway in higher education. In 1991 they earned 54 percent of the 1.1 million bachelor's degrees conferred in the United States and 54 percent of the 336,672 master's degrees. A decade ago, women earned 49 percent of the bachelor's degrees and 50 percent of the $H master's degrees.Women still trail men in doctor's degrees, according to the U.S. Department of Education. In 1980-1981, they earned 31 percent of the 33,000 doctorates awarded nationally. Last year, they earned 37 percent of the 39,500 doctorates.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
In the best of worlds, the College of Notre Dame of Maryland might have chosen another time to launch its first major fund-raising campaign since the 1980s. The effort began three years ago - at the end of the 1990s boom when many other women's colleges were facing financial troubles. In the past year alone, two women's colleges in the mid-Atlantic region have decided to start admitting men, Hood College in Frederick and Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia, and another, Notre Dame College in Manchester, N.H., has closed.
NEWS
November 4, 2002
Women's schools remain strong and relevant The Sun's article "Hood opts to go fully coed" (Oct. 19) noted the decline in the number of women's colleges in our country. But missed in this article, as in many others like it, is the vitality of a great number of women's colleges. And ironically, Hood College's announcement came in the same week that the College of Notre Dame of Maryland approved a new mission statement affirming the college's commitment to the education of women as leaders.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2002
RONALD J. Volpe is the only man living on the campus of Hood College in Frederick, but he might have company as early as next year. Volpe, who lives with his wife and daughter, happens to be president of the women's college, which has struggled recently with enrollment and finances. But things are looking up. Last year's freshman class was a scant 110. This year, Hood has 189 freshmen - freshwomen? - signed up. Multiply those additional 79 students by Hood's 2002-2003 tuition of $19,360, and you get a rough idea of how Volpe's year of ardent recruiting has paid off. And if Hood decides to become fully coeducational - it accepts a small number of men as commuters - things will get even better.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Elizabeth Geen, a former Goucher College vice president, academic dean and professor of English who later served as president of Mount St. Agnes College, died of heart failure Saturday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 99. A formidable presence whose love of education, students, books, ideas and informed conversation lasted until the end of her life, Dr. Geen began her career at Goucher in 1950, shortly after the then-women's college had moved from St. Paul and 23rd streets to Towson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 1999
NORTHAMPTON, Mass. -- Hunched over their oscilloscopes and diode circuits on the third floor of McConnell Hall at Smith College on a wet, gray morning, all 12 students in Professor Nalini Easwar's electronics class say they hope to pursue careers in physics or engineering.Nothing all that unusual there -- Smith, a women's college, has long had a contingent of hard-science majors. Moreover, many male-dominated professions have filled so rapidly with women over the past two decades that today nearly equal numbers of men and women are graduating from the nation's schools of law and medicine.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
Members of a search committee for a new president for Bryn Mawr College were supposed to recommend several candidates to the trustees, but they collectively fell for one person: Nancy Vickers, a dean and professor of French, Italian and comparative literature at the University of Southern California.Yesterday, the trustees gave their unanimous approval to Vickers, electing her to replace Mary Patterson McPherson, who will join the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in New York this year.A 1967 graduate of Mount Holyoke College, Vickers is an advocate of women's colleges like it and Bryn Mawr that have resisted coeducation.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service Staff writer Laura Lippman contributed to this article | March 8, 1993
Riding a nationwide wave of female consciousness-raising, women's colleges are reporting a surge in applications and admissions unprecedented since the 1960s.Thanks in part to such highly visible women as Anita Hill, %J congressional candidates and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton -- herself a women's college graduate -- the nation's 84 women-only campuses are reporting an average rise in enrollment of 10 percent over a year ago."In the past two years, where women's issues have been in the spotlight, female students have become better-informed consumers," said Jadwiga Sabrechts, executive director of the Women's College Coalition in Washington.
NEWS
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1996
"Sisters in Arms," by Jo Ann Kay McNamara. Harvard. 768 pages. $35In 1852 Baltimore, the first plenary council urged all bishops to attach schools to their churches, recognizing the importance of education to the Roman Catholic mission in the United States - work undertaken largely by nuns, who also founded 30 percent of the women's colleges in the United States. Jo Ann Kay McNamara, a history professor at Hunter College and at the CUNY Graduate Center, acknowledges her own debt to a Catholic education in the preface to "Sisters in Arms," her exhausting, fascinating, tragic and admirable history of Catholic women in religious orders over 2000 years.
NEWS
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1996
"Sisters in Arms," by Jo Ann Kay McNamara. Harvard. 768 pages. $35In 1852 Baltimore, the first plenary council urged all bishops to attach schools to their churches, recognizing the importance of education to the Roman Catholic mission in the United States - work undertaken largely by nuns, who also founded 30 percent of the women's colleges in the United States. Jo Ann Kay McNamara, a history professor at Hunter College and at the CUNY Graduate Center, acknowledges her own debt to a Catholic education in the preface to "Sisters in Arms," her exhausting, fascinating, tragic and admirable history of Catholic women in religious orders over 2000 years.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Ten years after Goucher College's world was turned upside down, most students at the former women's school don't give a second thought to its status as a coeducational college.But, a decade ago, their female predecessors carried signs saying "Better Dead Than Coed" and "Men Are Not The Answer."And the students hung black balloons at the college entrance in Towson when the board of directors voted overwhelmingly to end 100 years of a women-only tradition in 1986."There were a lot of tears when they made the decision," said Jenifer Mitchell Reed, Class of 1986.
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