Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWomen S Clothing
IN THE NEWS

Women S Clothing

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
In a move that will add to short-term profit pressure but could pay off later, Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. will stop selling women's clothing next year and concentrate on menswear.Women's apparel makes up about 18 percent or 20 percent of Bank's revenue. Dropping women's clothing will give Bank added management resources and store space to do a good job on its new lines of so-called "casual careerwear" for men, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Timothy F. Finley said yesterday.Bank, based in Hampstead, has sold women's suits and skirts for years, along with its men's suits, sport coats, shirts and other office garb.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
Wear the shirt, feel the power Laura Furbay wanted to do more than start her own women's clothing company. She wanted to create a sisterhood of women. And so Go Girl Garbs was born. For the last few months, Furbay has been working out of her downtown Westminster storefront designing, marketing and selling hip T-shirts and loungewear that celebrate women's strength and femininity. Go Girl T-shirts don't have popular, well-worn slogans such as "Angel," "Hottie," and "Princess." They say "Driven" and "Independent" and "Natural Born Leader."
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 4, 2000
IT WAS ANOTHER episode of that male melodrama, "When Guys Go Shopping." One night this week, my teen-age son and I found ourselves deep in the middle of a women's clothing department, staring at a rack of nightgowns. This was not our turf, and we were anxious to grab a gown and get going. We were shopping for a birthday present for my wife. There are two occasions each year - Christmas and my wife's birthday - that I venture into the realm of women's clothing stores. During each I try to drag at least one of our two sons along, to help pick out a gift for their mother, and to share the pain.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 4, 2000
IT WAS ANOTHER episode of that male melodrama, "When Guys Go Shopping." One night this week, my teen-age son and I found ourselves deep in the middle of a women's clothing department, staring at a rack of nightgowns. This was not our turf, and we were anxious to grab a gown and get going. We were shopping for a birthday present for my wife. There are two occasions each year - Christmas and my wife's birthday - that I venture into the realm of women's clothing stores. During each I try to drag at least one of our two sons along, to help pick out a gift for their mother, and to share the pain.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 29, 1995
Limited Inc. said yesterday it plans to split into three companies and sell stakes in two: its lingerie and women's clothing businesses.The parent company would hold on to its men's and children's clothing stores, including Structure and Abercrombie & Fitch Co. One group to be split off will be the successful lingerie and toiletries operations, such as Victoria's Secret; the other would contain its flagship Limited and other women's clothing chains.Analysts...
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 10, 1995
ALMOST EVERYTHING Americans buy is now made outside America. You knew that long ago. I knew it too, but I hadn't really believed it until various women took me shopping in December.This meant killing time in women's wear divisions of assorted marts. What a learning experience these marts afforded. I'd heard that marts were taking over the world, but I had never thought enough about marts to ask, "What is a mart anyhow?"Nothing beats on-site inspection. As a result I now know that a mart is a store selling goods made almost exclusively in Asia and Central America.
FEATURES
By Carrie Mason-Draffen and Carrie Mason-Draffen,Newsday | November 22, 1990
Once considered an outpost of clothing where style was more by accident than by design, outfits for larger women have taken a giant step forward into high fashion in the past two to three years.Leading the movement in that direction are mail-order catalog businesses, represented by giants such as Spiegel and smaller companies such as Jean Grayson's Brownstone Studio in New York. Some of the catalogs include their own lines as well as clothing from designers, who increasingly are entering the market for larger women.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
The cost of change continued to take a toll on Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. as the company reported yesterday nearly $2 million in losses for the second quarter, due chiefly to the phasing-out of its line of women's wear.The Hampstead-based catalog retailer and 83-store chain lost $1.99 million, or 29 cents a share, for the three months ended July 29. That compared with a loss of $345,000, or 5 cents a share, over the same period last year.The negative numbers came as no surprise: After a loss of $4.2 million in the first quarter, Bank Chairman and Chief Executive Timothy F. Finley had cautioned that more red ink would follow.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
Wear the shirt, feel the power Laura Furbay wanted to do more than start her own women's clothing company. She wanted to create a sisterhood of women. And so Go Girl Garbs was born. For the last few months, Furbay has been working out of her downtown Westminster storefront designing, marketing and selling hip T-shirts and loungewear that celebrate women's strength and femininity. Go Girl T-shirts don't have popular, well-worn slogans such as "Angel," "Hottie," and "Princess." They say "Driven" and "Independent" and "Natural Born Leader."
NEWS
June 26, 1996
County police arrested two Glen Burnie women Monday night and charged them with shoplifting merchandise from a Marley Station department store.Charlotte Brinkmeyer, 21, of the 100 block of Warwickshire Lane, and Angela Jones, 34, of the 500 block of Longwood Ave., were each charged with one count of theft less than $300.A security officer at Macy's told police he saw two women place men's and women's clothing into plastic bags about 7 p.m.When the women attempted to leave the store without paying for the clothes, the security officer detained them.
NEWS
June 26, 1996
County police arrested two Glen Burnie women Monday night and charged them with shoplifting merchandise from a Marley Station department store.Charlotte Brinkmeyer, 21, of the 100 block of Warwickshire Lane, and Angela Jones, 34, of the 500 block of Longwood Ave., were each charged with one count of theft less than $300.A security officer at Macy's told police he saw two women place men's and women's clothing into plastic bags about 7 p.m.When the women attempted to leave the store without paying for the clothes, the security officer detained them.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
The cost of change continued to take a toll on Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. as the company reported yesterday nearly $2 million in losses for the second quarter, due chiefly to the phasing-out of its line of women's wear.The Hampstead-based catalog retailer and 83-store chain lost $1.99 million, or 29 cents a share, for the three months ended July 29. That compared with a loss of $345,000, or 5 cents a share, over the same period last year.The negative numbers came as no surprise: After a loss of $4.2 million in the first quarter, Bank Chairman and Chief Executive Timothy F. Finley had cautioned that more red ink would follow.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
In a move that will add to short-term profit pressure but could pay off later, Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. will stop selling women's clothing next year and concentrate on menswear.Women's apparel makes up about 18 percent or 20 percent of Bank's revenue. Dropping women's clothing will give Bank added management resources and store space to do a good job on its new lines of so-called "casual careerwear" for men, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Timothy F. Finley said yesterday.Bank, based in Hampstead, has sold women's suits and skirts for years, along with its men's suits, sport coats, shirts and other office garb.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 29, 1995
Limited Inc. said yesterday it plans to split into three companies and sell stakes in two: its lingerie and women's clothing businesses.The parent company would hold on to its men's and children's clothing stores, including Structure and Abercrombie & Fitch Co. One group to be split off will be the successful lingerie and toiletries operations, such as Victoria's Secret; the other would contain its flagship Limited and other women's clothing chains.Analysts...
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 10, 1995
ALMOST EVERYTHING Americans buy is now made outside America. You knew that long ago. I knew it too, but I hadn't really believed it until various women took me shopping in December.This meant killing time in women's wear divisions of assorted marts. What a learning experience these marts afforded. I'd heard that marts were taking over the world, but I had never thought enough about marts to ask, "What is a mart anyhow?"Nothing beats on-site inspection. As a result I now know that a mart is a store selling goods made almost exclusively in Asia and Central America.
FEATURES
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 26, 1994
Ocean City -- If you want to look hot for summer, plan on going by the board -- the surfboard. That surfing look is the wave to catch for beach style.And the style this year is retro redux. Shorts and T-shirts are still in -- they may never go out, say seasoned fashion observers in this resort city. But the vintage styles that spiced haute couture earlier this season have stamped beach standards too: bandana-print and polka-dot bikinis for women, wide-stripe shirts for men."Kids are very big now into what the '70s were," says Chauncey Rhodes, owner of Chauncey's Surf Shop (formerly Hanley's)
FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | October 9, 1991
IT'S NOT OFTEN the fashion industry comes to the population and asks for help. In fact, the last time was 1940.Recently, the American Society for Testing and Materials poked the fashion industry in the ribs and told it to take notice: The last time anyone took a hard look at the standard for women's ready-to-wear sizing was in 1940. That year, the measurements of 8,000 military women were taken and the results averaged to develop the standard size ranges still in use today. Everything's been fine for about 50 years, but something has happened to the population that has made the industry realize that study may now be obsolete.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
A "Come explore our new low prices" sign and like-new nursery furniture, placed across the store front, pull customers into the Pass It On Shop."I saw a porta-crib outside last week," said one customer, dropping into the shop. "You still have it?""That item sold the first day it came in," said the owner, Louanne K. Calvin.Mrs. Calvin took the customer's name and phone number and promised to call as soon as she stocked another crib at her consignment shop in Eldersburg Plaza.Shoppers rarely leave empty-handed, said the owner.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lowe and Jennifer Lowe,Orange County Register | November 25, 1993
Often the only fit older women experience in the dressing room is one of frustration.Necklines choke. Zippers won't close. Even elastic waists can be too tight."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
A "Come explore our new low prices" sign and like-new nursery furniture, placed across the store front, pull customers into the Pass It On Shop."I saw a porta-crib outside last week," said one customer, dropping into the shop. "You still have it?""That item sold the first day it came in," said the owner, Louanne K. Calvin.Mrs. Calvin took the customer's name and phone number and promised to call as soon as she stocked another crib at her consignment shop in Eldersburg Plaza.Shoppers rarely leave empty-handed, said the owner.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.