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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
When Jeanette R. Wolman was a high school student in Birmingham, Ala., she wrote to the dean of the Columbia University Law School in New York seeking admission to the school. She received a curt reply."Columbia does not admit women to its law school. If you're interested in going to college, apply at Barnard," the dean wrote.Undeterred, Mrs. Wolman became a lawyer and, during a legal career that spanned nearly seven decades, fought for women.Mrs. Wolman died Sunday of heart failure at Church Home, where she had resided since December.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
The Howard County Women's Bar Association is dispatching female lawyers and judges to middle school classrooms to speak with pupils about the legal profession and answer such questions as "Why does Judge Judy act the way she does?""We're getting them to think about different aspects of the law," said Ria Rothvarg, chairwoman of the Law Day committee of the Women's Bar Association.Since 1996, female lawyers and judges have been speaking to Howard County middle schoolers. Rothvarg said they are trying to reach eighth-graders who are learning about the U.S. Constitution and just beginning to think about careers.
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NEWS
July 3, 1991
McMillen's misleading 'newsletter'Once again, households in the 4th Congressional District received an edition of Rep. Tom McMillen's so-called "Washington Report." Mailed at taxpayer expense, this shameful piece of self-advertising purports to let constituents know what great feats McMillen has accomplished in Washington over the last few months. But instead of containing any useful information, the "Washington Report" has no fewer than five photographs of McMillen crowding out any hard news.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
When Jeanette R. Wolman was a high school student in Birmingham, Ala., she wrote to the dean of the Columbia University Law School in New York seeking admission to the school. She received a curt reply."Columbia does not admit women to its law school. If you're interested in going to college, apply at Barnard," the dean wrote.Undeterred, Mrs. Wolman became a lawyer and, during a legal career that spanned nearly seven decades, fought for women.Mrs. Wolman died Sunday of heart failure at Church Home, where she had resided since December.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Ruth Urice Keeton -- daughter of a postmaster, wife of a college vice president, mother of three, and political activist at a time when few women were in the political arena -- will be honored tonight by the Women's Bar Association of Howard County.Keeton was a pioneer for women in the county, said Bobbie Fine, immediate past president of the Women's Bar Association."We didn't even think of another name," Fine said of the association board's decision to name Keeton as recipient of its first recognition award for local women.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
Hundreds of volunteers have been sitting quietly in Maryland's courtrooms this week, keeping their eyes peeled for displays of "gender bias" from the state's judges and lawyers.It has not been the most covert of stakeouts, however. The judges saw them coming.The weeklong "Courtwatch" was commissioned by the Women's Bar Association of Maryland as a follow-up to a 1989 study that said discrimination against women was widespread in the state's courts.More than 370 volunteers -- mostly females, mostly students, paralegals and members of organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the House of Ruth -- were recruited and trained to monitor the courtrooms and keep score of everything from gender- and race-based jokes to the formality of the lawyers' attire.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
Because of an editing error, an article in yesterday's Howard County edition of The Sun erroneously referred to the challengers in the election for Howard County Circuit Court. Both District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and attorney Jonathan Scott Smith are challenging newly appointed judges Donna Hill Staton and Diane O. Leasure in the March 5 primary.The Sun regrets the error.Howard County's two newest Circuit Court judges picked up the endorsement of one influential lawyers group yesterday and are expected to win support from another this week -- and their challengers are fuming.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
Bobbie Fine told a seventh-grade class yesterday what she's seen happen to juveniles who get in trouble with the law: handcuffs, leg irons, house arrest and sometimes jailhouse beatings.In the past four years, Fine and others in the Women's Bar Association of Howard County have lectured students on everything from juvenile justice to the history of women in law. Yesterday, she and two others spoke to classes at Elkridge Landing Middle School.In addition to reaching out to the community, the 55 or so members of the county women's bar also reach out to one another, providing the networking and support that has enabled many of its members to start and maintain their own law practices.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
The Howard County Women's Bar Association is dispatching female lawyers and judges to middle school classrooms to speak with pupils about the legal profession and answer such questions as "Why does Judge Judy act the way she does?""We're getting them to think about different aspects of the law," said Ria Rothvarg, chairwoman of the Law Day committee of the Women's Bar Association.Since 1996, female lawyers and judges have been speaking to Howard County middle schoolers. Rothvarg said they are trying to reach eighth-graders who are learning about the U.S. Constitution and just beginning to think about careers.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
The Women's Bar Association of Maryland has appointed an Annapolis lawyer to handle complaints about Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr. or other judges on the county bench.The action resulted from some 40 complaints, said Tricia D. O'Neill, vice president of the 1,200-member association.Members objected to Judge Cahill's sympathetic comments Oct. 17 in sentencing a Parkton trucker, who pleaded guilty to manslaughter and received 18 months on work release for shooting his wife after he found her in bed with another man.Ms.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Ruth Urice Keeton -- daughter of a postmaster, wife of a college vice president, mother of three, and political activist at a time when few women were in the political arena -- will be honored tonight by the Women's Bar Association of Howard County.Keeton was a pioneer for women in the county, said Bobbie Fine, immediate past president of the Women's Bar Association."We didn't even think of another name," Fine said of the association board's decision to name Keeton as recipient of its first recognition award for local women.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
Bobbie Fine told a seventh-grade class yesterday what she's seen happen to juveniles who get in trouble with the law: handcuffs, leg irons, house arrest and sometimes jailhouse beatings.In the past four years, Fine and others in the Women's Bar Association of Howard County have lectured students on everything from juvenile justice to the history of women in law. Yesterday, she and two others spoke to classes at Elkridge Landing Middle School.In addition to reaching out to the community, the 55 or so members of the county women's bar also reach out to one another, providing the networking and support that has enabled many of its members to start and maintain their own law practices.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
Because of an editing error, an article in yesterday's Howard County edition of The Sun erroneously referred to the challengers in the election for Howard County Circuit Court. Both District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and attorney Jonathan Scott Smith are challenging newly appointed judges Donna Hill Staton and Diane O. Leasure in the March 5 primary.The Sun regrets the error.Howard County's two newest Circuit Court judges picked up the endorsement of one influential lawyers group yesterday and are expected to win support from another this week -- and their challengers are fuming.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
The Women's Bar Association of Maryland has appointed an Annapolis lawyer to handle complaints about Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr. or other judges on the county bench.The action resulted from some 40 complaints, said Tricia D. O'Neill, vice president of the 1,200-member association.Members objected to Judge Cahill's sympathetic comments Oct. 17 in sentencing a Parkton trucker, who pleaded guilty to manslaughter and received 18 months on work release for shooting his wife after he found her in bed with another man.Ms.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Sarah Rosenberg Burke, one of the University of Maryland School of Law's first women graduates who later taught citizenship to many immigrants, died Thursday of heart failure at the home of her daughter in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where she had lived since 1988.One of her early professional colleagues, Jeanette Rosner Wolman, said of her: "She was a feminist and worked hard for women's rights."That included helping organize the few women lawyers in the state in the 1920s.Mrs. Burke tried in 1919 to gain admittance to the University of Maryland School of Law, but was turned down because, she was told, the school had no restrooms for women.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
Hundreds of volunteers have been sitting quietly in Maryland's courtrooms this week, keeping their eyes peeled for displays of "gender bias" from the state's judges and lawyers.It has not been the most covert of stakeouts, however. The judges saw them coming.The weeklong "Courtwatch" was commissioned by the Women's Bar Association of Maryland as a follow-up to a 1989 study that said discrimination against women was widespread in the state's courts.More than 370 volunteers -- mostly females, mostly students, paralegals and members of organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the House of Ruth -- were recruited and trained to monitor the courtrooms and keep score of everything from gender- and race-based jokes to the formality of the lawyers' attire.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington.More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December.Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard."Personally, I'm a little angry and tired of asking people to support my work," Gless said.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Sarah Rosenberg Burke, one of the University of Maryland School of Law's first women graduates who later taught citizenship to many immigrants, died Thursday of heart failure at the home of her daughter in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where she had lived since 1988.One of her early professional colleagues, Jeanette Rosner Wolman, said of her: "She was a feminist and worked hard for women's rights."That included helping organize the few women lawyers in the state in the 1920s.Mrs. Burke tried in 1919 to gain admittance to the University of Maryland School of Law, but was turned down because, she was told, the school had no restrooms for women.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington.More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December.Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard."Personally, I'm a little angry and tired of asking people to support my work," Gless said.
NEWS
July 3, 1991
McMillen's misleading 'newsletter'Once again, households in the 4th Congressional District received an edition of Rep. Tom McMillen's so-called "Washington Report." Mailed at taxpayer expense, this shameful piece of self-advertising purports to let constituents know what great feats McMillen has accomplished in Washington over the last few months. But instead of containing any useful information, the "Washington Report" has no fewer than five photographs of McMillen crowding out any hard news.
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