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NEWS
September 5, 1996
THE 1992 ELECTIONS almost doubled the number of women in Congress, the result of a record number of women candidates. Commentators called 1992 the "year of the woman," reflecting a surge of political activity among women generally attributed to negative fallout from the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings the year before.By 1994, the spotlight had turned from women candidates to Newt Gingrich and his brash young Republicans who swung control of Congress to the GOP. The Republican victory prompted descriptions of that electoral season as the "year of the angry white male."
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NEWS
By Joseline Peña-Melnyk | November 14, 2013
Women political leaders from the east and west came together in Washington D.C. this summer to advance women's roles in building sustainable peace as part of the women's leadership conference, "Women at the Tables of Power. " This exchange between U.S. state legislators and women parliamentarians was a golden opportunity to listen to women whose backgrounds are unlike my own, and to learn about the special challenges they face. I stood shoulder to shoulder with women leaders from Egypt, Morocco, Afghanistan and Pakistan whose work and courage I admire.
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NEWS
April 26, 1991
Delegate Elizabeth S. Smith, R-Anne Arundel County, has been electedtreasurer of Women Legislators of the Maryland General Assembly for 1991-1992.
NEWS
November 6, 2011
I note that in your editorial drumming up black support for homosexual unions, you disparage the black ministers who leaned on lawmakers to oppose the marriage equality bill ("Marriage and race," Nov. 2). The two women legislators who caused the vote to be postponed did not vote against the bill but instead behaved rather cowardly by refusing to show up at the judiciary committee meeting when the vote was held. The only thing those black ministers did wrong was not speak out even more boldly, often and loudly to express their opposition to the homosexual lifestyle.
NEWS
November 6, 2011
I note that in your editorial drumming up black support for homosexual unions, you disparage the black ministers who leaned on lawmakers to oppose the marriage equality bill ("Marriage and race," Nov. 2). The two women legislators who caused the vote to be postponed did not vote against the bill but instead behaved rather cowardly by refusing to show up at the judiciary committee meeting when the vote was held. The only thing those black ministers did wrong was not speak out even more boldly, often and loudly to express their opposition to the homosexual lifestyle.
NEWS
March 29, 1994
Something revolutionary is happening in the State House. Over a two-day span last week, women legislators seized the initiative and won unexpected and convincing victories against the odds. It was a telling display of political muscle-flexing that could foreshadow an even more impressive demonstration of woman-power following the fall elections in redrawn legislative districts."It's a new day," said an elated Del. Jennie Forehand of Montgomery County after the 36 women delegates united to deliver a stunning -- and overdue -- rebuke to the House Judiciary Committee, which had eviscerated a domestic violence bill.
NEWS
October 11, 1998
The Maryland Commission for Women and Women Legislators of Maryland are seeking recommendations of outstanding Maryland women for induction into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame.The Hall of Fame honors women who have made unique and lasting contributions to the economic, political, cultural and social life of the state, and can serve as role models for young women.Nominations will be accepted from organizations and individuals. An independent committee of citizens will review the nominations and make recommendations to the governor.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Concern over domestic issues, combined with greater political opportunities, have put women in a position to capture more congressional seats than ever before, says the head of the National Women's Political Caucus.But Harriett Woods, head of the bi-partisan group, told Maryland women legislators that the progress won't mean much if the "Year of the Woman" turns out to be only 365 days long."If it is only one year, we're not very happy," she said. Rather, Mrs. Woods said, the recent support for female candidates should mark the beginning of a trend toward more female office holders.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | September 16, 1993
Seven months after a sexual harassment controversy ripped apart Maryland's General Assembly, the legislature's presiding officers yesterday put lawmakers on notice that sexually offensive behavior will be punished.Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. unilaterally issued an eight-page policy that defines sexual harassment and sets up procedures for reporting, investigating and resolving complaints.But their action immediately was criticized by the new chair of the General Assembly's women's caucus, who said she was "shocked" that the two men had drafted and put into effect a sexual harassment policy without giving women legislators any advance warning or bothering to ask for their input.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
The race for state treasurer just got a lot more interesting. With the support of many women legislators, a veteran female delegate is bucking House leadership by running for the job.Del. Pauline H. Menes, 71, a Democrat who has represented Prince George's County for 29 years, announced her candidacy yesterday at a meeting of the legislative women's caucus.She faces the front-runner, Del. Richard N. Dixon, 57, a conservative Carroll County Democrat who enjoys the support of House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. of Cumberland.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 25, 2010
There are 180,000 more women living in Maryland than men, according to the Census Bureau. Women far surpass men in enrollment and graduation from Maryland universities, and they tend to get better grades. Baltimore has its second woman mayor. Women Legislators of Maryland, founded in the 1960s, was the first women's legislative caucus in the country. Nearly one legislator in three in Annapolis is female, the ninth-highest proportion in the country. If Maryland's Barbara Mikulski is re-elected this year, she'll be the longest-serving woman in the history of the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Julie Bykowicz and Baltimore Sun reporters | March 12, 2010
Women lawmakers angrily protested Thursday to House Speaker Michael E. Busch about the way a committee that handles sensitive crime legislation treats those who come to Annapolis to testify. In particular, the head of the women's caucus said, Judiciary Committee Chairman Joseph F. Vallario Jr.'s "tyrannical leadership" has become intolerable. "He sets the tone for the committee," said Del. Sue Kullen, a Calvert County Democrat and president of the Women Legislators of Maryland, which includes the General Assembly's 58 female lawmakers.
FEATURES
By Crystal Sayles and Crystal Sayles,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
Avon producers are mixing beauty sense with social awareness this weekend when they bring their Let's Talk Beauty Tour to the Inner Harbor. Baltimoreans who show up for makeup makeovers or advice will be asked to sign a petition to have the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 reauthorized. The act, which includes provisions ranging from grants for counseling to efforts for preventing dating violence, expires in September. The law requires that the addresses of victims remain private. "There are one in nine women affected by domestic violence," says Erin Mayer, Avon tour manager.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
A widely anticipated tally of absentee ballots yesterday left House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. still trailing his challenger by 71 votes, but he may call for a recount. Taylor met last night with his staff and legal team to weigh options. He said he would decide today whether he would ask for a recount of the 11,219 votes cast in the race. "The difference is less than a half of a percent," Taylor said. "I want to make sure the vast majority of the voters in my county have the representative they want."
NEWS
October 11, 1998
The Maryland Commission for Women and Women Legislators of Maryland are seeking recommendations of outstanding Maryland women for induction into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame.The Hall of Fame honors women who have made unique and lasting contributions to the economic, political, cultural and social life of the state, and can serve as role models for young women.Nominations will be accepted from organizations and individuals. An independent committee of citizens will review the nominations and make recommendations to the governor.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Joan Jacobson and Michael Dresser and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
A Baltimore County judge's decision to expunge the conviction of a businessman who brutally beat his estranged wife could end up costing the state's entire judiciary a pay raise, some prominent women legislators warned yesterday.Del. Joan B. Pitkin, a member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee, said the action by Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger Sr. "throws a real monkey wrench" into an effort to raise judges' pay by $9,000 a year."We have to send a message, and this is one way," said Pitkin, a Prince George's County Democrat.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Joan Jacobson and Michael Dresser and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
A Baltimore County judge's decision to expunge the conviction of a businessman who brutally beat his estranged wife could end up costing the state's entire judiciary a pay raise, some prominent women legislators warned yesterday.Del. Joan B. Pitkin, a member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee, said the action by Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger Sr. "throws a real monkey wrench" into an effort to raise judges' pay by $9,000 a year."We have to send a message, and this is one way," said Pitkin, a Prince George's County Democrat.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Sheridan Lyons contributed to this article | December 8, 1994
Angry women legislators yesterday called for the head of Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr. for the lenient prison sentence he gave a Parkton trucker who killed his wife after finding her in bed with another man.More than 30 of the 54 female delegates and senators elected to the Maryland General Assembly last month gathered on the State House steps to demonstrate their unified support for Judge Cahill's removal from the bench.The women handed out copies of a joint resolution they said they intend to introduce when the General Assembly convenes next month.
NEWS
September 5, 1996
THE 1992 ELECTIONS almost doubled the number of women in Congress, the result of a record number of women candidates. Commentators called 1992 the "year of the woman," reflecting a surge of political activity among women generally attributed to negative fallout from the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings the year before.By 1994, the spotlight had turned from women candidates to Newt Gingrich and his brash young Republicans who swung control of Congress to the GOP. The Republican victory prompted descriptions of that electoral season as the "year of the angry white male."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
The race for state treasurer just got a lot more interesting. With the support of many women legislators, a veteran female delegate is bucking House leadership by running for the job.Del. Pauline H. Menes, 71, a Democrat who has represented Prince George's County for 29 years, announced her candidacy yesterday at a meeting of the legislative women's caucus.She faces the front-runner, Del. Richard N. Dixon, 57, a conservative Carroll County Democrat who enjoys the support of House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. of Cumberland.
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