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By Holly Selby | June 27, 2001
What does a female athlete look like? She has rippling muscles. She is as light as a gazelle. She is petite. She is husky. She can run for miles, lift hundreds of pounds, explode off a starting block, twirl in the air. She is beautiful. In 1994, journalist Jane Gottesman began trying to answer that question her own way. She contacted newspapers, college archives, sports magazines and museums, asking for pictures of women participating in sports. The results of her search go on display today through Jan. 2 at the Smithsonian Institution.
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NEWS
March 10, 2009
Are expectant mothers adding Marissa and Kristi to their lists of baby girl names today? Are thousands of Marylanders budgeting for $175 Final Four seats? If the General Assembly chooses to rewrite the lyrics to "Maryland, My Maryland," will it include laudatory references to Head Coach Brenda Frese? If not - why not? With their 92-89 overtime victory over Duke on Sunday, the Maryland Terrapins women's basketball team accomplished something their Y-chromosome-toting counterparts in College Park never have: They won the Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament after capturing the regular season title, too. Their position as one of four top seeds in the March Madness tournament is virtually assured.
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SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | February 6, 1992
Today is National Girls and Women in Sports Day. Goucher College will celebrate with a recreational basketball game at 6 p.m., followed by a brief history of women in athletics by Maggie Faulkner, a sports psychologist at Towson State, and an 8 p.m. game against Catholic.Accordingly, this space is devoted to women collegians.There was a time not so long ago when Morgan State track and field had one of the nation's top sprint crews. The Bears are headed back in that direction, thanks to Andrea Thomas, a junior transfer from San Jacinto College in Texas who was on the Jamaican Olympic team in 1984 and '88.Thomas, 23, claims bests of 51.2 seconds and 2:01 in the 400 and 800 meters, respectively.
SPORTS
By WILLIAM C. RHODEN and WILLIAM C. RHODEN,THE NEW YORK TIMES | April 10, 2007
I stood in front of associate professor Barbara Osborne's sports law class at the University of North Carolina last week. The subject was the seldom-talked-about disparity of power and privilege between black and white women in the sports industry. The timing was fitting. This year is the 35th anniversary of Title IX, the congressional legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program that receives federal financial assistance. A week earlier, hundreds attended a convention in Cleveland, the site of the women's basketball Final Four, to celebrate and discuss Title IX, the law that changed the sports landscape in America.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
Kelly Heier dreams of playing college basketball, but the 12-year-old has never been to a college women's game.As a youngster, Dana Bollinger never attended a women's college game either, but she is living Heier's dream at Goucher College.Tomorrow, Bollinger and her Gophers teammates will introduce Kelly and her Fallston travel teammates to women's college basketball as part of Goucher's commemoration of the 12th National Girls and Women in Sports Day. Kelly's team will scrimmage Towson's 11-12 travel team as a prelude to the Gophers' 2 p.m. game against Marymount.
SPORTS
February 7, 1995
Olympic medal-winning gymnast Dominique Dawes will be one of the guests at a panel discussion on women in sports at 2 p.m. today at St. Paul's School for Girls in Brooklandville.The event, in recognition of last week's National Girls and Women in Sports Day, will be held at the school gym.Dawes, 18, was the all-around champion at the 1994 U.S. nationals and won a bronze medal at the 1992 Olympics. She'll be joined by triathlete Lyn Brooks, a 1966 graduate of St. Paul's who has competed in 13 Ironman Triathlons; Laura Dupont, a former tennis pro who was ranked 10th in the world at one time and who now is a teaching pro at the Orchard Indoor Tennis Club; Julie Staver, a field hockey and lacrosse player at West Chester University who has played on the U.S. field hockey and lacrosse teams; Danielle Brewster, a senior at St. Paul's who is a competitive steeplechase rider; and Maryalice Yakutchik, a former lacrosse player at Temple who now teaches feature writing at the College of Notre Dame and works as a free-lance journalist for publications that include Women's Sports and Fitness.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
In a television sneaker advertisement, a series of girls and women complete the sentence "If you let me play " with "I will have more self-confidence" and "I will be more likely to leave a man who beats me."Yesterday, about 40 girls and their mothers, sisters, grandmothers and adult female friends played basketball, volleyball and duckpin bowling. They took aerobics classes and worked out on weight machines as part of the 10th annual National Girls and Women in Sports Day at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
TC Shara BoonshaftSchool: Centennial High SchoolHometown: ColumbiaAge: 17Shara serves as the school's Student Government Association president this year and has been a class board member since her freshman year. She belongs to the National Honor Society and the Human Relations Club.She played varsity soccer for four years, varsity basketball her sophomore year and varsity lacrosse her junior year.Aside from her school activities and her nearly perfect grade point average that places her in the top 5 percent of her class, she's trying to develop a women's studies program for Howard County schools.
NEWS
April 18, 2005
WHAT MESSAGE is the Bush administration trying to send about women in sports? At the same time that it supported an important extension of Title IX - the 1972 law that prohibits sex discrimination in federally funded schools and colleges - to cover whistleblowers, it seems to want to undermine enforcement. The Department of Education posted a surprise notice on its Web site last month that was called a "clarification" of how schools can demonstrate that they are following the law. Instead of clarity, however, the department has generated unnecessary confusion and could threaten 30 years of progress in expanding athletic opportunities for young women.
SPORTS
By WILLIAM C. RHODEN and WILLIAM C. RHODEN,THE NEW YORK TIMES | April 10, 2007
I stood in front of associate professor Barbara Osborne's sports law class at the University of North Carolina last week. The subject was the seldom-talked-about disparity of power and privilege between black and white women in the sports industry. The timing was fitting. This year is the 35th anniversary of Title IX, the congressional legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program that receives federal financial assistance. A week earlier, hundreds attended a convention in Cleveland, the site of the women's basketball Final Four, to celebrate and discuss Title IX, the law that changed the sports landscape in America.
NEWS
April 18, 2005
WHAT MESSAGE is the Bush administration trying to send about women in sports? At the same time that it supported an important extension of Title IX - the 1972 law that prohibits sex discrimination in federally funded schools and colleges - to cover whistleblowers, it seems to want to undermine enforcement. The Department of Education posted a surprise notice on its Web site last month that was called a "clarification" of how schools can demonstrate that they are following the law. Instead of clarity, however, the department has generated unnecessary confusion and could threaten 30 years of progress in expanding athletic opportunities for young women.
NEWS
By Randy Harvey and Randy Harvey,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
ATHENS - As a girl playing youth soccer in New Brunswick, N.J., Heather O'Reilly had a poster of Mia Hamm on her bedroom wall. On Monday night on the island of Crete, O'Reilly, 19, scored the winning goal in overtime after receiving a crossing pass from Hamm, 32, as the U.S. women's Olympic soccer team beat Germany, 2-1, to earn a berth in tonight's gold-medal match against Brazil. For soccer aficionados, the pass was important because of its impact on the game. For supporters of women's sports in the United States, it was even more significant as a symbolic passing of the torch from one generation of highly regarded athletes to another.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | June 27, 2001
What does a female athlete look like? She has rippling muscles. She is as light as a gazelle. She is petite. She is husky. She can run for miles, lift hundreds of pounds, explode off a starting block, twirl in the air. She is beautiful. In 1994, journalist Jane Gottesman began trying to answer that question her own way. She contacted newspapers, college archives, sports magazines and museums, asking for pictures of women participating in sports. The results of her search go on display today through Jan. 2 at the Smithsonian Institution.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 25, 1999
Bras are in the news again. Instead of refusing to wear them, as we did in the free-love '60s, instead of burning them, as we did in the feminist '70s, women are ripping off their shirts and showing off their bras in ecstatic celebrations of victory.Brandi Chastain and her black sports bra made the cover of national newspapers and magazines after her penalty kick won soccer's World Cup for the American women. She didn't look sexy as much as she looked lean and primal and full of teeth-clenching joy. I'm not a guy, but I found myself looking at her abs. She has the chest of a young boy, but gee whiz, what a six-pack.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 18, 1999
BOSTON -- So this is what it's like to be a soccer mom. Hold the minivan. Forget about the pollsters. Never mind the demographic cliches.It's about taking pride in the sheer, sweaty, muscular joy of the go-for-broke winners. It's about taking pleasure in the faces of girls in the stands, faces painted red, white and blue, instead of blush-on pink and mascara black.On July 10, some 90,000 fans filled the Rose Bowl in the glaring afternoon sun to watch 20 women pass and kick their way up and down a scoreless field.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 5, 1999
Imagine doing a major amount of the advance work for a bigger-than-big party, up to and including previewing the talent and publicizing the event, only to find that you don't get invited.That's the annual predicament ESPN finds itself in regarding the NCAA men's basketball tournament. Most nights during the winter, it's hard to tune in to the self-proclaimed "worldwide leader in sports" and not see college hoops of some sort, yet when it comes down to the marquee event of the year, ESPN has its corporate face pressed against the glass looking in.But for Dick Vitale, the tournament is just an example of not missing what you haven't got."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 18, 1995
Yesterday was a big day of comings and goings among women in the sports broadcasting biz.As long rumored, CBS announced that Martina Navratilova, who did a splendid job of analysis at Wimbledon for Home Box Office, will come aboard for the U.S. Open next month. Meanwhile, HBO snared Nicole Watson, who has reported for Turner's NFL and NBA productions, to join the cable network's "Inside the NFL" show as a feature reporter.However, the biggest heist of the day was made by Fox, which lured Pam Oliver away from ESPN to join its NFL coverage team.
NEWS
March 10, 2009
Are expectant mothers adding Marissa and Kristi to their lists of baby girl names today? Are thousands of Marylanders budgeting for $175 Final Four seats? If the General Assembly chooses to rewrite the lyrics to "Maryland, My Maryland," will it include laudatory references to Head Coach Brenda Frese? If not - why not? With their 92-89 overtime victory over Duke on Sunday, the Maryland Terrapins women's basketball team accomplished something their Y-chromosome-toting counterparts in College Park never have: They won the Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament after capturing the regular season title, too. Their position as one of four top seeds in the March Madness tournament is virtually assured.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewel and Christian Ewel,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
It is late on a Saturday afternoon in a gym in Catonsville, and Julie Ward is being tested and judged.After she manages to suit up in the cramped locker room with the dim light, Ward will endure a barrage of cajoling and nagging and heckling by fans and coaches of UMBC and Quinnipiac.For this referee, the reward is the final buzzer, a dinner in Little Italy, and the knowledge that she has made a contribution to the game she loves most."For former players, for those who won't go on to a pro career, the opportunities are enormous, especially for the women," said Ward, who travels to officiate women's basketball games on the weekends when she's not working as a nurse at St. Joseph's Hospital and Union Memorial Hospital.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
Kelly Heier dreams of playing college basketball, but the 12-year-old has never been to a college women's game.As a youngster, Dana Bollinger never attended a women's college game either, but she is living Heier's dream at Goucher College.Tomorrow, Bollinger and her Gophers teammates will introduce Kelly and her Fallston travel teammates to women's college basketball as part of Goucher's commemoration of the 12th National Girls and Women in Sports Day. Kelly's team will scrimmage Towson's 11-12 travel team as a prelude to the Gophers' 2 p.m. game against Marymount.
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