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By The Globalist.com | November 19, 2006
Everybody knows by now that, with the likely election of Nancy Pelosi as speaker of the House of Representatives, she will be the first woman to hold that post in U.S. history. And early polls say Hillary Clinton is a leading Democratic contender for the presidency. Condoleezza Rice is viewed favorably as a potential presidential candidate by some Republicans and, last week, Washington Sen. Patty Murray joined the Democratic leadership team in the U.S. Senate. How does that compare with the rise of women to high political office in other major countries around the world?
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Mildred Otenasek, a pioneering force for women in Maryland Democratic politics and a much-loved professor and mentor at her alma mater, Notre Dame of Maryland University, died Nov. 19 at her home in Roland Park. She was 98. A diminutive, soft-spoken woman with a fierce intellect and a determination to both succeed and blaze a path for the women who would follow her, Mrs. Otenasek became a driving force in politics, including a stint as the first female member of the Democratic National Committee for Maryland.
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NEWS
March 15, 2004
Cardinal Franz Koenig, 98, who influenced Vatican policy toward other religions and postwar communist regimes, died in his sleep Saturday in Vienna, Austrian radio reported. Cardinal Koenig was Vienna's archbishop from 1956 until 1958, when Pope John XXIII elevated him to cardinal. He was president of the papal Secretariat for Non-Believers from 1966 to 1981 and played a key role in preparations for the Second Vatican Council, which was held from 1962 to 1965. Susan Okin, 57, a feminist political theorist whose work focused on the exclusion of women from western political thought, died March 3 in Lincoln, Mass.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 14, 2010
A sk yourself: Who is likely to be the first woman president of the United States? Despite our assumption that a female president is inevitable, and likely soonish, it's surprisingly difficult to come up with a name. Briefly, Hillary Clinton seemed the obvious answer. For a flicker, Sarah Palin was an entertaining notion - and remains so among a certain contingent of stubborn optimists. Other names surface now and then: Meg Whitman, Condoleezza Rice, Janet Napolitano, to name a few. But who, really, is likely to shatter the White House ceiling?
NEWS
September 14, 2008
September 1920 was all about women in politics in Harford County. As a result of the recent passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, women were given the right to vote. The Aegis newspaper reported that the Republican women "will take their initial fling into local political matters when they convene in the Armory to elect a member of the Republican State Central Committee on September 14." The Aegis continued, "In order to get in the good graces of the ladies, our Republican leaders hit upon the plan of filling the existing vacancy with a lady, elected by popular vote.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
The talk at the Carroll County Women's Fair on March 28 will range from careers and politics to massage and floral arranging."It's an opportunity for women -- all kinds of women -- to get together and meet people," said organizer Rachelle Hurwitz of Uniontown."
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 8, 1990
WASHINGTON -- From hard-fought Senate races in New Jersey and Hawaii to down-and-dirty statehouse contests in Texas and California, an unprecedented number of women battled for major political office Tuesday, yielding mixed results but still making dramatic changes in the nation's political landscape."
NEWS
By Gail Collins | November 24, 1998
IN THE history of women in politics, November may go down as the month Rep. Deborah Pryce, an Ohio Republican, was re-elected secretary of the Republican House leadership conference. Ms. Pryce won by a unanimous vote, possibly nailing down the secretary job for years to come.The post-election theme for women in politics is stasis. The number of female senators is frozen at nine and governors at three.In the House, which added a couple of new women, Republicans elected Ms. Pryce and Rep. Tillie Fowler of Florida to the same bottom two spots women held last term.
NEWS
By ANNE TAYLOR FLEMING | July 22, 1992
Los Angeles -- Soon after the historic California primary put two women in Senate contention and 18 women among the finalists for the state's 52 congressional seats, I found myself amid a celebratory sea of women at a Los Angeles fund-raiser for State Treasurer Kathleen Brown, feeling a little grumpy around the edges.But why? After all, it had been a long haul for women in politics. It was time to celebrate, as a quartet of female luncheon speakers clearly aimed to do and as numbers of women did again at the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 29, 1992
AS a woman, I can hardly wait for the Year of the Woman to be history -- and I bet I'm not the only female who feels that way. The claptrap meter on this issue has been in the danger zone for too long.George Bush was said to have "outraged women's groups" (notice how those three words seldom go out separately?) by muttering, during a discussion about women candidates in one of the debates, "I hope most of them lose." Some press reports treated his remark as a "gaffe." How so? President Bush is, at least nominally, a Republican.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
September 1920 was all about women in politics in Harford County. As a result of the recent passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, women were given the right to vote. The Aegis newspaper reported that the Republican women "will take their initial fling into local political matters when they convene in the Armory to elect a member of the Republican State Central Committee on September 14." The Aegis continued, "In order to get in the good graces of the ladies, our Republican leaders hit upon the plan of filling the existing vacancy with a lady, elected by popular vote.
NEWS
By Lynette Long | May 18, 2008
This primary campaign has been quite a learning experience, but the lessons have mainly been bitter ones for women. Here are some things I learned on the way to the Democratic National Convention: * People are more sensitive to racism than sexism. My twenty-something daughter returned home extremely agitated after casting her ballot in the Democratic primary. "This white guy was wearing a T-shirt that read, 'Hillary, cook my food, but don't run my country,' and no one said a thing. If I wore a T-shirt that said, 'Obama, shine my shoes but don't run my country,' I'd be called a racist."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,sun reporter | November 27, 2006
In Maryland politics, 2006 was not exactly the Year of the Woman. No major statewide office was captured by a woman. The eight-member congressional delegation remains all-male. And after the number of women serving in Maryland's General Assembly reached the highest peak in the history of the state legislature, Election Day reduced that number by more than 10 percent. "Women had a very bad year in Maryland," said Paula C.
NEWS
By The Globalist.com | November 19, 2006
Everybody knows by now that, with the likely election of Nancy Pelosi as speaker of the House of Representatives, she will be the first woman to hold that post in U.S. history. And early polls say Hillary Clinton is a leading Democratic contender for the presidency. Condoleezza Rice is viewed favorably as a potential presidential candidate by some Republicans and, last week, Washington Sen. Patty Murray joined the Democratic leadership team in the U.S. Senate. How does that compare with the rise of women to high political office in other major countries around the world?
NEWS
March 15, 2004
Cardinal Franz Koenig, 98, who influenced Vatican policy toward other religions and postwar communist regimes, died in his sleep Saturday in Vienna, Austrian radio reported. Cardinal Koenig was Vienna's archbishop from 1956 until 1958, when Pope John XXIII elevated him to cardinal. He was president of the papal Secretariat for Non-Believers from 1966 to 1981 and played a key role in preparations for the Second Vatican Council, which was held from 1962 to 1965. Susan Okin, 57, a feminist political theorist whose work focused on the exclusion of women from western political thought, died March 3 in Lincoln, Mass.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 8, 2000
BOSTON -- Reluctant as I am to steal the spotlight from Florida, we here in Massachusetts have a small political announcement: Florida may have pregnant chads, but we have a pregnant lieutenant governor. Florida may be laboring mightily with a battalion of legal midwives to get one candidate out of the Votomatic birth canal, but Jane Swift is having twins. This is not an exercise in one-ups woman-ship, I assure you. I repeat this only because, in the end, Jane Swift's maternity dress may have more meaning, at least for the future of women in politics, than Katherine Harris' St. John knits.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 8, 2000
BOSTON -- Reluctant as I am to steal the spotlight from Florida, we here in Massachusetts have a small political announcement: Florida may have pregnant chads, but we have a pregnant lieutenant governor. Florida may be laboring mightily with a battalion of legal midwives to get one candidate out of the Votomatic birth canal, but Jane Swift is having twins. This is not an exercise in one-ups woman-ship, I assure you. I repeat this only because, in the end, Jane Swift's maternity dress may have more meaning, at least for the future of women in politics, than Katherine Harris' St. John knits.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 5, 1991
Boston -- And now as we make our daily rounds, we pause for a moment to check the pulse of public life for signs of Post-Thomas Stress Syndrome.Has the sexual shock that streaked through the body politic during the Thomas hearings worn off? Or are the aftereffects likely to continue?For a proper diagnosis, we put on our best bedside manner and approach the Congress first, where we find symptom one: Bi-Partisan All-Male Angst. This condition, a nervous tic in the presence of women voters, is apparent in both Republicans and Democrats, though Democrats are more likely to replay scenes of sheer incompetence in their heads and on their VCRs.
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