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Women In Combat

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NEWS
June 20, 1991
At this point in history, the law technically permits a woman in uniform to become head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff but she cannot jump into a foxhole as an infantry grunt in a shooting war. Not for long. As a result of the gulf war, the movement in Congress to remove legislative obstacles to women in combat has become as irresistible as Stormin' Norman's storied offensive.The House has already approved the elimination of restrictions on the assignment of women to aerial combat. In the Senate, there is a movement to remove all gender-oriented impediments from the law books and to leave military assignments to the Pentagon brass and their civilian bosses.
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NEWS
June 22, 2013
As a Vietnam-era U.S. Marine, I understand why there are only eight female names on the Vietnam Memorial wall out of 58,267. What perplexes me is why women would want to face the horrible conditions of forward combat units in the horror of war ("Pentagon to open most combat roles to women," June 19)? Most combatants our troops face these days are young, Sharia-minded Muslim men from a culture which devalues women; they will react with a horrible vengeance to any woman we put in a battle situation against them.
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NEWS
By ROSEMARY MARINER | May 26, 1996
FOUR HUNDRED years before the birth of Christ, Plato's "Republic" described the Just City protected by a warrior clan whose defining characteristic was thymos, roughly translated as "spiritedness." Because this trait was not a function of gender, but found in individuals of both sexes, Plato argued that "what has to do with war, must be assigned to women also, and they must be used in the same ways." The concept of men and women marching alongside in battle had nothing to do with equal opportunity or radical feminism, concepts noticeably absent in Greek philosophy, but rather was considered just and provided for the city's best defense.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 28, 2013
It is hard for me to celebrate the news that women will now be permitted to serve in combat roles. I am pleased for the women in the military who will not have their paths to promotion blocked by artificial limits. Women are, in fact, in harm's way in Afghanistan and other hot spots, and they deserve whatever rewards come with that. And I agree with retired Air Force Brig. Gen. Wilma Vaught, who told Gail Collins of The New York Times, "I think people have come to the sensible conclusion that you can't say a woman's life is more valuable than a man's life.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A committee established to advise the Pentagon on the status of women in the military recommended yesterday that Defense Secretary Dick Cheney seek repeal of laws barring women from serving in combat positions.Citing the performance of female GIs in the Persian Gulf war, the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Military Services adopted the recommendation in a 29-4 vote at the conclusion of a three-day closed meeting in Washington.Panel leaders discussed the recommendations Monday with Mr. Cheney and Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an instant, the chiefs of the nation's armed forces rendered Rep. Patricia Schroeder, one of Capitol Hill's snappiest, quick-witted politicians, speechless.The four-star officers argued yesterday that outrage over sexual harassment in the military and demands that women be treated fairly should not be used to justify giving women a full range of combat assignments.Besides, reasoned Marine Gen. Carl E. Mundy Jr., women "are not ideally suited" for killing. "It's not a pleasant job. It's not good, it's debasing.
NEWS
By EDWARD J. HOGAN | May 26, 1996
IN AN INCISIVE and best-selling treatise on America in the 1990s, Philip Howard argues that the establishment of group rights as the main thrust of reform efforts in our society, to the detriment of the basic principles of our democratic heritage, has resulted in "The Death of Common Sense" (Random House, 1994).The continuing saga of the Navy's efforts to accommodate the politically correct pro femina paradigm of a unisex Navy by placing women in combat billets, while not mentioned in Howard's diagnosis, is a major case in point.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer Richard H. P. Sia of the Washington Bureau contributed to this report | May 25, 1993
For the first time, a group of women graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy will join the once-exclusive fraternity of fighter jocks.They entered the academy four years ago aware that their career options in the Navy would be limited because of the ban against women in combat.But in the last month, the barriers have begun to fall. Female midshipmen have greater opportunities than ever, now that Defense Secretary Les Aspin has lifted prohibitions against women flying fighter jets and ordered that other combat duties be opened to them.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 15, 2003
BOSTON - Anyone who's spent a lot of time white-water rafting down the river of social change gets to see a lot of ironies washed up on the banks. But these are beauties. About 21 years ago, the Equal Rights Amendment crashed against a handful of legislators in North Carolina, Illinois and Florida. The opponents had listed three horrible fates that would follow if we added women's equality to the Constitution. If there were an ERA, we would have (1) unisex toilets, (2) women in combat and (3)
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 1, 2003
THE NEWS LAST week included video of a young American mother held as a prisoner of war, pictures of a woman soldier, barely more than a girl, missing in action, and word that the Air Force Academy, guilty of ignoring the rape of dozens of female cadets, had been forced to clean house. Women may have come a long way in the military - they have been permitted on combat aircraft and combat vessels since 1994 - but these headlines make it clear that women have not yet arrived. Our country, and its military, still doesn't know what to make of women soldiers.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
When Maryland National Guard Capt. Cara Kupcho first enlisted in the military 18 years ago, she wanted to drive a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, a 30-ton, armor-busting tank. "I like things that go boom," she explained Thursday. "I like tanks. " But as a woman, Kupcho was barred from joining any of the armored units that used the vehicles. She became a mechanic instead, able to maintain tanks, but prohibited from driving them into battle. Outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced plans Thursday to end the long-standing prohibition on servicewomen in direct combat roles, opening hundreds of thousands of jobs formerly limited to men. "In our democracy, I believe it is the responsibility of every citizen to protect the nation," Panetta said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta will end the long-standing prohibition on women serving in direct combat, Pentagon officials said Wednesday, opening hundreds of thousands of military jobs previously closed to female service members. Panetta and Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will announce the end of the so-called combat exclusion policy Thursday, officials said. The move is expected to take years to implement fully. Army Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt welcomed the decision.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
Thousands of military jobs have opened up to women in recent years, but not those in the front-line combat units. That may soon change, however, as a result of a lawsuit brought late last year by four women veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, including Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt of Gaithersburg. Their complaint alleges that banning women from combat roles solely on the basis of their gender violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution and restricts women's opportunities for career advancement and higher earnings and pensions.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | April 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- On any given day, one isn't likely to find common cause with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. He's a dangerous, lying, Holocaust-denying, Jew-hating cutthroat thug - not to put too fine a point on it. But he was dead-on when he wondered why a once-great power such as Britain sends mothers of toddlers to fight its battles. Mr. Ahmadinejad characterized the release of 15 British sailors and marines, including one woman, seized at sea last month, as a gift to Britain.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 15, 2006
When Maryland's Emily Perez died in Iraq, her West Point graduation picture -- with all the brass buttons and the plumage and her triumphant smile -- made the pages of newspapers everywhere. That picture, unlike the ones of soldiers' coffins that we are rarely permitted to see, opened a painful conversation most of us do not want to have. Who should we ask to defend us? Just our sons? Or our daughters, too? Emily Perez was a stellar student at Oxon Hill High School in Prince George's County and she went on to become the first female command sergeant in the history of West Point.
NEWS
By Barbara Samson Mills | May 17, 1993
SHE WENT TO WAR. By Rhonda Cornum, as told to Peter Copeland. Presidio. 203 pages. $19.95.IF THE enraged opponents of women in combat would read "She Went to War," their fears and prejudices should be dispelled. Maj. Rhonda Cornum may be remembered as one of two women prisoners of war during the Persian Gulf conflict who, though wounded, returned home alive.This amazing woman is a flight surgeon on active duty with the Army, a medical doctor, pilot, paratrooper and Ph.D. in biochemistry, the wife of an Air Force flight surgeon and, last but not least, the (attractive)
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | May 28, 1995
Fifty years after victory in Europe and two decades after fleeing Saigon, the U.S. Armed Forces approach Memorial Day 1995 in a relatively sanguine mood. Military morale has been better, of course, but it has also been a lot worse.Service men and women have their worries -- a nagging unease that their commander-in-chief doesn't fully understand the demands of their mission, questions about the size and structure of each service, debates about women in combat and lingering controversies over whether homosexuals should be allowed to serve at all.But all in all, the military is facing a lot less wrenching change than other parts of the federal government or even many private companies.
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