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By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1994
The Women Composers Orchestra concluded its ninth season with a Sunday concert at Shriver Hall, featuring vocal and instrumental works by contemporary and 19th-century female composers.The vocal portion of the program, consisting of works by Baltimore-based composer Hillary Kruh and Diane Thome, was the highlight of the afternoon.Ms. Kruh's "The Voice of Your Eyes" is a song cycle based on poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti and e.e. cummings that deal with different aspects of love. Unlike some modern composers, Ms. Kruh understands the beauties and limitations of the human voice.
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NEWS
March 9, 2008
POP MUSIC LIZZ WRIGHT / / 7 p.m. Friday. Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis. $35. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadtavern.com. ....................... Lizz Wright, one of the best singer-songwriters to arrive on the pop scene in years, has showcased her luxuriant vocals and poetic lyrics over three strong albums: Salt (2003), Dreaming Wide Awake (2005) and The Orchard, released last month. The latter is probably her most assured effort, an intense, sensuous tapestry of folk, jazz, gospel and the blues.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | February 19, 1991
English pianist and composer Elaine Hugh-Jones once asked famed conductor Sir Thomas Beecham why he didn't play her music. "You're a woman," he said, "and there are no women composers."Betty Scott, board member of Baltimore's Women Composers Orchestra, recalls Hugh-Jones telling that story when the orchestra played one of her works here. Scott's addendum is that the International Encyclopedia of Women Composers lists 6,000 composing women worldwide.The chance to show off musical works by women is the purpose of the 11-member chamber music group, presenting its first non-school concert this season at 8 p.m. Saturday at Shriver Hall on the Johns Hopkins University campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 26, 2004
Quick - name five women composers. OK, try three. Still too tough? Then consider taking what might be considered a crash course in the criminally under-appreciated subject of women composers, presented by the Jezic Ensemble Sunday at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. You'll get to hear the talents of remarkable French composer Lili Boulanger, first woman to win one of the most coveted prizes for composers, the Prix de Rome, in 1913. And Libby Larsen, one of the most distinctive voices in American contemporary music today.
FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
Charis Bean Duke does not shy away from her opinions. "Who wants to write a piece that no one can play and no one wants to hear?" asks the 23-year-old composer. "Doesn't that defeat the purpose of music?"Audiences can discover for themselves how Duke answers these questions on Sunday evening when the Women Composers Orchestra, led by conductor Antonia Joy Wilson, gives the world premiere of her tone poem "Four Glimpses of Night." Inspired by a poem by Frank Marshall Davis, an African American poet, "Night" represents a return to Duke's roots -- both musical and geographic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 26, 2004
Quick - name five women composers. OK, try three. Still too tough? Then consider taking what might be considered a crash course in the criminally under-appreciated subject of women composers, presented by the Jezic Ensemble Sunday at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. You'll get to hear the talents of remarkable French composer Lili Boulanger, first woman to win one of the most coveted prizes for composers, the Prix de Rome, in 1913. And Libby Larsen, one of the most distinctive voices in American contemporary music today.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
Betty Scott is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
BETTY SCOTT is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
NEWS
May 27, 1994
Women in MusicIt was encouraging to read James Roos' nationally syndicated May 20 article, "Women have a hand in classical music,"Women are finally beginning to be more widely recognized for their accomplishments as composers and conductors of classical music. As a point of interest, the two conductors pictured in the article are known to Baltimore audiences.Catherine Comet was formerly the associate conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and Kate Tamarkin was the conductor of the Women Composers Orchestra during its 1988-1989 season.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
POP MUSIC LIZZ WRIGHT / / 7 p.m. Friday. Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis. $35. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadtavern.com. ....................... Lizz Wright, one of the best singer-songwriters to arrive on the pop scene in years, has showcased her luxuriant vocals and poetic lyrics over three strong albums: Salt (2003), Dreaming Wide Awake (2005) and The Orchard, released last month. The latter is probably her most assured effort, an intense, sensuous tapestry of folk, jazz, gospel and the blues.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 1996
When Aleta Greene started to read poems from Dolores Kendrick's book "The Women of Plums: Poems In the Voices of Slave Women," she had no idea what to expect. All she knew was that her friend Wall Matthews -- a composer, guitarist and percussionist whom Greene had known for years -- was writing music for these poems and felt that Greene would be the woman to sing them.By the time she finished reading, she was in tears."I called him the night that I read them," she says. "I was crying, because they were so moving to me, and he was overwhelmed that I was so moved."
NEWS
May 27, 1994
Women in MusicIt was encouraging to read James Roos' nationally syndicated May 20 article, "Women have a hand in classical music,"Women are finally beginning to be more widely recognized for their accomplishments as composers and conductors of classical music. As a point of interest, the two conductors pictured in the article are known to Baltimore audiences.Catherine Comet was formerly the associate conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and Kate Tamarkin was the conductor of the Women Composers Orchestra during its 1988-1989 season.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1994
The Women Composers Orchestra concluded its ninth season with a Sunday concert at Shriver Hall, featuring vocal and instrumental works by contemporary and 19th-century female composers.The vocal portion of the program, consisting of works by Baltimore-based composer Hillary Kruh and Diane Thome, was the highlight of the afternoon.Ms. Kruh's "The Voice of Your Eyes" is a song cycle based on poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti and e.e. cummings that deal with different aspects of love. Unlike some modern composers, Ms. Kruh understands the beauties and limitations of the human voice.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
BETTY SCOTT is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
Betty Scott is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
FEATURES
By Peter Krask and Peter Krask,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
Charis Bean Duke does not shy away from her opinions. "Who wants to write a piece that no one can play and no one wants to hear?" asks the 23-year-old composer. "Doesn't that defeat the purpose of music?"Audiences can discover for themselves how Duke answers these questions on Sunday evening when the Women Composers Orchestra, led by conductor Antonia Joy Wilson, gives the world premiere of her tone poem "Four Glimpses of Night." Inspired by a poem by Frank Marshall Davis, an African American poet, "Night" represents a return to Duke's roots -- both musical and geographic.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 1996
When Aleta Greene started to read poems from Dolores Kendrick's book "The Women of Plums: Poems In the Voices of Slave Women," she had no idea what to expect. All she knew was that her friend Wall Matthews -- a composer, guitarist and percussionist whom Greene had known for years -- was writing music for these poems and felt that Greene would be the woman to sing them.By the time she finished reading, she was in tears."I called him the night that I read them," she says. "I was crying, because they were so moving to me, and he was overwhelmed that I was so moved."
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 25, 2007
Mendelssohn, Schumann, Mahler -- these composers are so famous they usually go by last names alone. Now consider this roster: Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Alma Mahler. How many people instantly recognize them as composers, too? To narrow the topic even more, how many people have heard their music often enough to think of it as familiar? Welcome to the history of female composers. It's a history well worth exploring, especially as we're in the midst of National Women's History Month -- complete with some complementary concert scheduling.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | February 19, 1991
English pianist and composer Elaine Hugh-Jones once asked famed conductor Sir Thomas Beecham why he didn't play her music. "You're a woman," he said, "and there are no women composers."Betty Scott, board member of Baltimore's Women Composers Orchestra, recalls Hugh-Jones telling that story when the orchestra played one of her works here. Scott's addendum is that the International Encyclopedia of Women Composers lists 6,000 composing women worldwide.The chance to show off musical works by women is the purpose of the 11-member chamber music group, presenting its first non-school concert this season at 8 p.m. Saturday at Shriver Hall on the Johns Hopkins University campus.
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