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By Ellen Goodman | March 21, 1999
BOSTON -- On the whole, I do prefer history-in-the-making. So I tip my hat to Elizabeth Dole as she places each foot ever so carefully on the runway to the title of "First Serious Female Contender for the Presidency."Announcing her "exploratory committee" this month, Ms. Dole looked like the perfect focus group candidate: competent, competitive and compassionate.Against the macho soundtrack from "Top Gun" she did a female-friendly Oprah impression. Despite a resume of jobs in five administrations, she assured us that she wasn't a politician.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, the self-styled dean of the Democratic women in Congress, urged support of female candidates in an address to her party's national convention Wednesday that came as both presidential campaigns sought to court women voters. As the longest-serving woman in Congress, Mikulski has emerged as a high-profile cheerleader and fundraiser for her party's female candidates. She has stepped into that role at an important time — as health care, abortion and equal pay have risen to the top of the nation's political discourse.
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NEWS
September 5, 1996
THE 1992 ELECTIONS almost doubled the number of women in Congress, the result of a record number of women candidates. Commentators called 1992 the "year of the woman," reflecting a surge of political activity among women generally attributed to negative fallout from the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings the year before.By 1994, the spotlight had turned from women candidates to Newt Gingrich and his brash young Republicans who swung control of Congress to the GOP. The Republican victory prompted descriptions of that electoral season as the "year of the angry white male."
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Frances Gast does not speak for me ("Most women agree with Palin," Readers respond, Sept. 28). How she can presume that most women are conservative is beyond the pale. I don't know when the word "liberal" became anathema, but "liberal" can also imply "expansive. " I enjoy Susan Reimer's column. She consistently produces thought provoking and entertaining work. There aren't enough women candidates out there with the intellectual gravitas of Hillary Clinton. I wish there were more women candidates period, but the climate in this country still has a distinct misogynist slant.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Frances Gast does not speak for me ("Most women agree with Palin," Readers respond, Sept. 28). How she can presume that most women are conservative is beyond the pale. I don't know when the word "liberal" became anathema, but "liberal" can also imply "expansive. " I enjoy Susan Reimer's column. She consistently produces thought provoking and entertaining work. There aren't enough women candidates out there with the intellectual gravitas of Hillary Clinton. I wish there were more women candidates period, but the climate in this country still has a distinct misogynist slant.
NEWS
By TOM W. SMITH and LANCE A. SELFA | October 4, 1992
Over the last decade, more and more women have bee competing for high political office. In 1992 a record number of women are running for Congress: 113 for the House of Representatives (up from the 70 in 1990) and 11 the U.S. Senate (up from eight in 1990). In addition, three women are running for governor.Not only are more women competing for high political office in 1992 than ever before, but a preponderance of women candidates are Democrats. Of the 124 women candidates for the Congress, two-thirds (84)
NEWS
May 26, 1992
"The Year of the Woman" in national politics was supposed to arrive two years ago, according to some pundits. It didn't. But evidence is mounting that this may very well be the year of a breakthrough for women candidates to Congress.For one thing, there are twice as many women running for the House and Senate than ever before. They have lots more money than ever. There are more "open" seats than usual, thanks to a record number of retirements and redistricting.Probably most important, the issues are running to their advantage.
NEWS
October 15, 1992
A lot has been said about this being the year of the woman candidate, and rightly so. Over 60 percent more women are running for Congress this year than two years ago. Many expect to win.In the Senate races, about half the women candidates are likely to win. Eleven are running and, according to the most recent polls, women candidates are ahead in five races. In a sixth race, the woman candidate appears to be closing the gap between her and a male incumbent.Two women candidates (Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein)
NEWS
October 7, 1992
Women, who represent only 6 percent of the U.S. House of Representatives and 2 percent of the U.S. Senate (not counting a recently appointed widow who is not a candidate in the special election to fill her late husband's seat), are the ultimate political outsiders. And in this, the year of the outsider, women seem likely to make great gains. There is a possibility that the number of women representatives will nearly double from the present 29. There is a possibility that the number of elected women senators will more than double.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | September 26, 1994
A NEW STUDY of women's chances of winning elections debunks the conventional wisdom that women have a harder time than men do.It is not a candidate's sex that is the determining factor, the study found; it is incumbency that offers a critical difference.That's not surprising. Incumbents' races usually are better financed by special-interest money from political action committees with a stake in the incumbents' voting records.The money, in turn, with the help of name recognition, helps incumbents finance slick advertising campaigns that many populist and underfinanced challengers, female or male, simply can't afford.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 8, 2004
BOSTON - Before I raise my glass to John Edwards, may I take a moment to salute a little-known "mentioner" on a small island in Maine. Midway through the Fourth of July parade, behind the fire trucks and before the clowns, there was a family float bearing the message: Woman Veep in 2004. Were it not for this one handmade poster, I suspect that the only "mention" of a woman on the Democratic ticket this year would have been someone "mentioning" how no woman had been seriously "mentioned."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT | November 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - While Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend fell short in her bid to become Maryland's first woman governor last night, woman gubernatorial candidates were battling to claim statehouses elsewhere throughout the country. In a departure from past years when most women candidates for governor were long shots, women ran strong campaigns in all nine states where they ran, and were victorious in at least three races. But many women's advocates, hoping for up to nine victories, were disappointed that 2002 didn't turn out to be the year of the woman governor.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 21, 1999
BOSTON -- On the whole, I do prefer history-in-the-making. So I tip my hat to Elizabeth Dole as she places each foot ever so carefully on the runway to the title of "First Serious Female Contender for the Presidency."Announcing her "exploratory committee" this month, Ms. Dole looked like the perfect focus group candidate: competent, competitive and compassionate.Against the macho soundtrack from "Top Gun" she did a female-friendly Oprah impression. Despite a resume of jobs in five administrations, she assured us that she wasn't a politician.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1998
THE SISTERHOOD'S back in the swing of political things this year.Next Tuesday, Harriet's List, the political action committee for Democratic women who favor abortion rights, is holding its first fund-raiser this election year for six candidates it's endorsing.In 1994, the PAC's first year out, Harriet's List did surprisingly well for a fledgling grass-roots group, and organizers are hoping for a replay this time -- with higher dollar amounts for more candidates.Last time, Harriet's List raised more than $124,000 and supported 21 women for various offices in both the primary and general elections.
NEWS
October 13, 1996
FOUR YEARS AGO, in the wake of the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill hearings, a record number of women were elected to the House and Senate. That Congress, the 103rd, had a total of 54 women -- seven in the Senate, 47 in the House. That was a significant jump from the 32 women who served in the previous Congress. In 1994, women raised their number only by three, to 57, as a brash young class of conservative Republicans helped wrest control of Congress from the Democrats.This year, however, women again appear poised to make gains, with both parties looking for victory for a number of promising female candidates in November.
NEWS
September 5, 1996
THE 1992 ELECTIONS almost doubled the number of women in Congress, the result of a record number of women candidates. Commentators called 1992 the "year of the woman," reflecting a surge of political activity among women generally attributed to negative fallout from the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings the year before.By 1994, the spotlight had turned from women candidates to Newt Gingrich and his brash young Republicans who swung control of Congress to the GOP. The Republican victory prompted descriptions of that electoral season as the "year of the angry white male."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 19, 1991
Washington -- WHY DO women continue to have such a hard time getting elected to public office? Because, a recent study by a leading woman pollster and analyst says, too many voters still think they aren't competent enough, tough enough or electable.Eighteen months after what was widely proclaimed in advance by women's political groups as "The Year of the Woman" in American politics, women are still assessing the causes of disappointing results in the 1990 elections. Of eight women who won gubernatorial primaries, only three were elected; of eight senatorial primary winners, only Republican Sen. Nancy Kassebaum was re-elected; of 70 House primary winners, only 29 were elected.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT | November 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - While Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend fell short in her bid to become Maryland's first woman governor last night, woman gubernatorial candidates were battling to claim statehouses elsewhere throughout the country. In a departure from past years when most women candidates for governor were long shots, women ran strong campaigns in all nine states where they ran, and were victorious in at least three races. But many women's advocates, hoping for up to nine victories, were disappointed that 2002 didn't turn out to be the year of the woman governor.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | September 26, 1994
A NEW STUDY of women's chances of winning elections debunks the conventional wisdom that women have a harder time than men do.It is not a candidate's sex that is the determining factor, the study found; it is incumbency that offers a critical difference.That's not surprising. Incumbents' races usually are better financed by special-interest money from political action committees with a stake in the incumbents' voting records.The money, in turn, with the help of name recognition, helps incumbents finance slick advertising campaigns that many populist and underfinanced challengers, female or male, simply can't afford.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
A new political action committee designed to increase the number of women elected officials in Maryland gave its support yesterday to 10 candidates for various state offices.The PAC, known as Harriet's List, made the expected selections in the races for governor and attorney general. It chose state Sen. Mary H. Boergers of Montgomery County for governor and Eleanor M. Carey for attorney general.While the choices came as no surprise, the selection of Ms. Carey is drawing attention because she is running against an incumbent -- Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. -- who has a strong record on women's issues.
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