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NEWS
December 11, 2005
Fiction Scorpion's Gate By Richard A. Clarke Typhoon Lover By Sujata Massey Missing Mom By Joyce Carol Oates Third Girl from the Left By Martha Southgate Everyone Worth Knowing By Lauren Weisberger Nonfiction Lennon Revealed By Larry Kane Cat People By Michael Korda and Margaret Korda 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus By Charles Mann I Can't Believe She Did That: Why Women Betray Other Women At Work By Nan Mooney ...
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Colonial Players' current production of Melanie Marnich's "These Shining Lives" tells the story of four young women in the early 1920s and 1930s who seize their chance at the American dream by finding employment at the Westclox Radium Dial Company. Marnich's poetic rendering of this true story had its world premiere six years ago at Center Stage in Baltimore, where it became a finalist for the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and the Weissberger Award. The play's opening lines introduce its full dimensions: "This isn't a fairy tale, though it starts like one. It's not a tragedy, though it ends like one. It's something else.
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FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | May 3, 1992
From The Sun May 3-9, 1842MAY 3: Ellicott's Mills Free Press states the population of the Union Works, in Howard District, comprises 613 persons, of which number 299 are males. Of this number there are 11 colored persons -- 3 males and 8 females.MAY 9: E. S. Milbourne, keeper of the City Spring in Calvert Street, is now actively engaged in the use of various means for the preservation of the trees within the enclosure.From The Sun May 3-9, 1892MAY 3: Councilman Clark told the Mayor yesterday that only 24 Belgian block street pavers lived in Baltimore and that if the law was carried out requiring employes of the city to be registered voters, very little work in that direction could be done this summer.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | July 20, 2008
The National Organization for Women convenes its annual conference this weekend in Bethesda against the backdrop of a presidential race that, according to NOW President Kim Gandy, has been underlined not only by one woman's historic campaign but also by an extraordinary amount of sexism. Gandy, who's serving her second term at the helm of the feminist advocacy group, talked with The Sun about those and other topics. She lives in Silver Spring with her husband and two daughters. Your theme for this weekend's conference is "No Capes, No Masks, No Boundaries: Feminist Super-Women Unite!"
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 1998
Video -- recorded and live -- was featured in three of the six works in a concert last weekend by Phoenix Dance Company, the faculty collective at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.But only in one did it actually contribute something. Mostly it was gimmicks and special effects, and forgettable.Happily, the dancing was not.As an intro, there was a 13-minute experimental video called "Changing Room" by Carol Hess and faculty videographer Vin Grabill, shown in 1996 on Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1997
Deciding that Howard County's battered women need more than the basics -- food, clothes and temporary shelter -- the county's Domestic Violence Center is developing a program to give its clients a measure of self-determination.The relationship between a battered woman named Yvette and a Howard County company gave the center a clear example of what it would like to do: get the community involved in assisting clients, not just in taking care of their immediate needs, but in reclaiming their lives so they can support themselves and their families.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | February 24, 1992
Words shape our reality, language experts say, so it's important to pay attention to phraseology and favorite sayings -- especially if you're an employed woman who wants to be politically correct or "p.c."And everyone knows "p.c." really stands for "polite and caring."Let's start right out with "employed women" or "women at work," the proper and economically acceptable ways to describe women in the paid labor market."Working women," also used to describe employed persons who are not men, is OK but not entirely politically correct.
TRAVEL
September 3, 2000
Women at work A new museum opening this month in Dallas chronicles the American woman and her evolution from second-class citizen to societal force. The Women's Museum: An Institute for the Future, in association with the Smithsonian Institution, celebrates the strides women have made by detailing their illustrious history since the country's founding. The museum's signature icon is an Electronic Quilt (right), a 30-foot-tall matrix of electronic "patches" of still and moving images, quotes and symbolic colors.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | September 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Harried American women believe their lives are being consumed by balancing jobs and families, according to a new national survey of what women think."
NEWS
By Helen Thomas | August 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - Where are the prominent women activists in this election? Their silence is deafening. They are not high-voltage players this time around. They are invisible except for the ever-loving wives and daughters of Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush, whom they tout as perfect husbands and fathers. Laura Bush, featured at the Republican National Convention, praised her husband as a family man, not like you-know-who. She also took a few veiled potshots at President Clinton, saying the American people want someone they can "respect" in the White House, someone who will uphold its dignity.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
When Indra K. Nooyi was appointed PepsiCo's new chief executive this week, she became one of 11 female leaders of Fortune 500 companies. But because there are so few women on top of the corporate ladder, the spotlight on Nooyi will go beyond her business decisions. She will bear another responsibility: that of a role model inside and outside the corporate world. "For a woman, it's an extra burden not only being a role model for women in the company but you're carrying the weight [that]
NEWS
December 11, 2005
Fiction Scorpion's Gate By Richard A. Clarke Typhoon Lover By Sujata Massey Missing Mom By Joyce Carol Oates Third Girl from the Left By Martha Southgate Everyone Worth Knowing By Lauren Weisberger Nonfiction Lennon Revealed By Larry Kane Cat People By Michael Korda and Margaret Korda 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus By Charles Mann I Can't Believe She Did That: Why Women Betray Other Women At Work By Nan Mooney ...
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
Children of women exposed to common organic solvents during pregnancy have significantly lower scores on a wide range of cognitive, motor and behavioral tests, according to a new study. The average IQ of the exposed group was eight points lower than a group of comparable unexposed children - a gap one expert described as "huge." The study, which appeared in this month's issue of The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, focused solely on solvent exposure at work. "This has tremendous implications for the female work force," said University of Toronto psychologist Maru Barrera, one of the authors.
TRAVEL
September 3, 2000
Women at work A new museum opening this month in Dallas chronicles the American woman and her evolution from second-class citizen to societal force. The Women's Museum: An Institute for the Future, in association with the Smithsonian Institution, celebrates the strides women have made by detailing their illustrious history since the country's founding. The museum's signature icon is an Electronic Quilt (right), a 30-foot-tall matrix of electronic "patches" of still and moving images, quotes and symbolic colors.
NEWS
By Helen Thomas | August 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - Where are the prominent women activists in this election? Their silence is deafening. They are not high-voltage players this time around. They are invisible except for the ever-loving wives and daughters of Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush, whom they tout as perfect husbands and fathers. Laura Bush, featured at the Republican National Convention, praised her husband as a family man, not like you-know-who. She also took a few veiled potshots at President Clinton, saying the American people want someone they can "respect" in the White House, someone who will uphold its dignity.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 1998
Video -- recorded and live -- was featured in three of the six works in a concert last weekend by Phoenix Dance Company, the faculty collective at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.But only in one did it actually contribute something. Mostly it was gimmicks and special effects, and forgettable.Happily, the dancing was not.As an intro, there was a 13-minute experimental video called "Changing Room" by Carol Hess and faculty videographer Vin Grabill, shown in 1996 on Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
About 200 women astronomers came to Baltimore this week and found they have a lot in common: a feeling of isolation in their male-dominated discipline, some colleagues more interested in romance than their research and perceived discrimination in landing top jobs.For Sally Oey, a 28-year-old graduate student in astronomy at the University of Arizona in Tucson, the NASA-sponsored conference, called "Women at Work: Workshop on the Status of Women in Astronomy," helped build her confidence."I feel like it's OK to be in this position and be a feminist, that it's OK to try to work for change," she said.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
When Indra K. Nooyi was appointed PepsiCo's new chief executive this week, she became one of 11 female leaders of Fortune 500 companies. But because there are so few women on top of the corporate ladder, the spotlight on Nooyi will go beyond her business decisions. She will bear another responsibility: that of a role model inside and outside the corporate world. "For a woman, it's an extra burden not only being a role model for women in the company but you're carrying the weight [that]
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1997
Deciding that Howard County's battered women need more than the basics -- food, clothes and temporary shelter -- the county's Domestic Violence Center is developing a program to give its clients a measure of self-determination.The relationship between a battered woman named Yvette and a Howard County company gave the center a clear example of what it would like to do: get the community involved in assisting clients, not just in taking care of their immediate needs, but in reclaiming their lives so they can support themselves and their families.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
About 200 women astronomers came to Baltimore this week and found they have a lot in common: a feeling of isolation in their male-dominated discipline, some colleagues more interested in romance than their research and perceived discrimination in landing top jobs.For Sally Oey, a 28-year-old graduate student in astronomy at the University of Arizona in Tucson, the NASA-sponsored conference, called "Women at Work: Workshop on the Status of Women in Astronomy," helped build her confidence."I feel like it's OK to be in this position and be a feminist, that it's OK to try to work for change," she said.
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