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By JOHN DORSEY | January 14, 1999
The Women Artists' Forum of Baltimore is a group of emerging professional artists founded in the spring of 1997 to learn about art-related issues. It is open to artists in the Baltimore region and so far has organized two shows of members' work. The current one is at Resurgam Gallery on South Charles Street and features works by 28 of the current 37 members. Among them are Helene Ageloff, Frances Aubrey, Mary Catalano, Ruth Channing, Marge Feldman, Nancy Linden, Sally Sanford Ney, Beverly Polt, Michelle Santos and Bert Wallace.
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NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 29, 2006
Getting older is not something people like to talk about today. But Berkeley, Calif., author Amy Gorman still thought it was a great topic for a book. Aging Artfully (PAL Publishing; $20) is Gorman's look at the lives of 12 visual and performing women artists between the ages of 85 and 105, an idea she came up with several years ago. "I was in my early 60s at the time," recalled Gorman, 66. "I woke up one morning and decided I wanted to hang out with older women, particularly women artists, and see how the creative process evolved in older women."
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
Violence against women may currently preoccupy America's attention, due to the O.J. Simpson trial, but female artists have used the theme in their work for decades.That's the contention of a University of Maryland Baltimore County professor who has organized a three-day colloquium at the Catonsville campus to explore such works."I hope we won't mention too much about it [the trial] during our discussions," says Renate Fischetti, a professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | December 11, 2003
Scenes of winter Snowy docks and other seasonal landscapes are on view at the Baltimoregallery. The nonprofit art space's second annual Winter Scene exhibition includes photographic works from several local artists, including J.M. Giordano, Andy Kaslow, Amy Huntoon and Adrianna Amari. The show runs through Dec. 23. The Baltimoregallery is at 4519 Eastern Ave. Hours are noon-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays and by appointment. For more information, call 410-276-7966 or visit www .baltimoregallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 29, 1991
You might think of them as parallel voids: Art history virtually ignores women artists, and Broadway virtually ignores plays by and about women.Then Wendy Wasserstein's "The Heidi Chronicles" comes along and attempts to remedy both situations at once.Granted, the play -- currently at the Kennedy Center -- is episodic and a bit ragged structurally, and it has an ending that undoubtedly sets the teeth of hard-core feminists on edge. But Ms. Wasserstein has observed her generation of women with accuracy and wit.Spanning 25 years, the play follows art historian Heidi Holland through the first full flowering of the feminist movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | December 11, 2003
Scenes of winter Snowy docks and other seasonal landscapes are on view at the Baltimoregallery. The nonprofit art space's second annual Winter Scene exhibition includes photographic works from several local artists, including J.M. Giordano, Andy Kaslow, Amy Huntoon and Adrianna Amari. The show runs through Dec. 23. The Baltimoregallery is at 4519 Eastern Ave. Hours are noon-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays and by appointment. For more information, call 410-276-7966 or visit www .baltimoregallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 14, 2002
"Women in Theatre," an evening featuring a panel discussion and performance excerpts, will be held at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the University of Maryland's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, University Boulevard and Stadium Drive, College Park. The excerpted works include Chopping by Magde-lena Gomez, in which a Latina-American uses a wardrobe of eccentric clothing to tell the stories of three women who influenced her life; City Water Tunnel #3 by Marty Pottenger, based on interviews with 250 New Yorkers about a new tunnel that will convey water to city residents; and Alva, written by Alva Rogers and Lisa Jones and consisting of songs and monologues on the themes of race and gender, performed by Rogers.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
When Frances Aubrey was attending Maryland Institute College of Art in spring 1997 and about to graduate, she realized she would no longer get the routine critiques and encouragement from other students and teachers. She thought, "It's going to be pretty lonely out there painting just by myself." So she and fellow classmate Marge Feldman formed the Women Artists' Forum, a Baltimore-based group of emerging artists, to help female artists network and learn from each other. "Marge and I felt a need to support ourselves," said Aubrey, of Baltimore.
NEWS
October 31, 2003
County Arts Council offers 2 free lectures on women artists The Carroll County Arts Council will offer two free lectures next week on women artists that complement the current exhibit, The Gaia Girls: Re-calling the Goddess. Both lectures will be led by Susan Williamson, the council's visual arts coordinator. "Women Artists of the Surrealist Movement: Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo & Leonora Carrington" will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The movieFrida was released last year on the life of Kahlo, who, with Varo and Carrington, played major roles in the surrealist movement in Mexico.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 29, 2006
Getting older is not something people like to talk about today. But Berkeley, Calif., author Amy Gorman still thought it was a great topic for a book. Aging Artfully (PAL Publishing; $20) is Gorman's look at the lives of 12 visual and performing women artists between the ages of 85 and 105, an idea she came up with several years ago. "I was in my early 60s at the time," recalled Gorman, 66. "I woke up one morning and decided I wanted to hang out with older women, particularly women artists, and see how the creative process evolved in older women."
NEWS
October 31, 2003
County Arts Council offers 2 free lectures on women artists The Carroll County Arts Council will offer two free lectures next week on women artists that complement the current exhibit, The Gaia Girls: Re-calling the Goddess. Both lectures will be led by Susan Williamson, the council's visual arts coordinator. "Women Artists of the Surrealist Movement: Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo & Leonora Carrington" will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The movieFrida was released last year on the life of Kahlo, who, with Varo and Carrington, played major roles in the surrealist movement in Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 14, 2002
"Women in Theatre," an evening featuring a panel discussion and performance excerpts, will be held at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the University of Maryland's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, University Boulevard and Stadium Drive, College Park. The excerpted works include Chopping by Magde-lena Gomez, in which a Latina-American uses a wardrobe of eccentric clothing to tell the stories of three women who influenced her life; City Water Tunnel #3 by Marty Pottenger, based on interviews with 250 New Yorkers about a new tunnel that will convey water to city residents; and Alva, written by Alva Rogers and Lisa Jones and consisting of songs and monologues on the themes of race and gender, performed by Rogers.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 26, 2002
Artists have been depicting flowers and other botanical subjects for so long now that there hardly seems anything new left to say on the subject. Yet Christine Neill's mixed media watercolors at Gomez Gallery, on view through April 20, still seem remarkably contemporary and fresh. Neill's flowers and plants are executed in delicate, close-valued washes and graceful tracery that, like the flower paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe and the botanical photographs of Imogen Cunningham and Amy Lamb, give her diminutive subjects an uncanny aura of monumentality.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 14, 2002
The most striking image in Facing Herself, a fine show of eight women photographers at Baltimore's Creative Alliance (formerly the Fells Point Creative Alliance), is a close-up portrait of a young woman wearing blackface makeup by Washington-area artist Heidi Fancher. It's difficult to be certain of the race of the woman in the picture, though the head is framed by a pair of platinum blond curls that may or may not be a wig. The face wears an expression that is both vulnerable and defiant, as if to say, "Whaddaya think of me now?"
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
When Frances Aubrey was attending Maryland Institute College of Art in spring 1997 and about to graduate, she realized she would no longer get the routine critiques and encouragement from other students and teachers. She thought, "It's going to be pretty lonely out there painting just by myself." So she and fellow classmate Marge Feldman formed the Women Artists' Forum, a Baltimore-based group of emerging artists, to help female artists network and learn from each other. "Marge and I felt a need to support ourselves," said Aubrey, of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 21, 2001
Peter Milton and his mysterious black and-white etchings are not nearly as well known as they deserve to be. His large, luminous prints are operatic in their scale, subject matter and complexity. The group show at C. Grimaldis Gallery presents four masterful etchings from the artist's most recent series, Points of Departure, which Milton began in 1994. The earliest is entitled Mary's Turn (1994), followed by Nijinsky Variations (1996), Twentieth Century Limited (1997) and Pavane (1999)
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | September 30, 1990
They typically strike without warning in the dead of night, when few potential witnesses are likely to be around. They wear masks in public to conceal their identity. And their goal is the transformation of some of America's most visible institutions.Members of a new terrorist organization?Hardly, though their methods and mission presumably create some uneasiness, if not downright fear, among many of those in power. No, they are the Guerrilla Girls, the self-proclaimed "conscience of the art world."
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | December 15, 1996
IN A SEMINAL 1971 essay, historian Linda Nochlin observed that art "occurs in a social situation, is an integral element of social structure, and is mediated and determined by specific and definable social institutions," such as art schools, museums and the marketplace.Nochlin's essay was titled "Why There Are No Great Women Artists," and it sought not only to amend the history of art with what had been left out, but also to question how such omissions had been made in the first place.In doing so, Nochlin found it necessary to re-examine the established "canon" of art masterpieces and the ideological assumptions underlying it. Her work laid the foundation for a new, feminist art criticism that has revolutionized the very definition of the terms "art" and "artist," "exhibition" and "viewer."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 25, 1999
Is Billie Holiday one of the 100 greatest women of rock and roll?What about Mahalia Jackson? Tammy Wy-nette? Ella Fitzgerald?Not rock and rollers, you say? Well, what do you know? Because each of these legendary singers has a place in VH1's "100 Greatest Women of Rock and Roll," a five-part series airing on the cable channel this week.Jazz singer Holiday, in fact, is No. 6 on the list, perched right between singer/songwriter Joni Mitchell (No. 5) and Pretenders leader Chrissie Hynde (No. 7)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 24, 1999
Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold are two African-American artists who have forged significant reputations, Catlett as a sculptor and Ringgold for an art form she created that combines aspects of painting and quilt making.Their works have been shown from coast to coast in this country and internationally, and are included in leading museum collections. Their art reflects their experience as African-Americans and women, yet has a breadth of appeal that knows no barriers.Since early last year, two major shows, one devoted to each artist, have been on separate national tours: "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts."
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