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By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | May 29, 1991
Mayor Kurt Schmoke has called on Baltimore's business community to follow the city's lead and earmark 23 percent of its contracting, purchasing and professional services business to firms owned by women and minorities.The mayor also has asked the Greater Baltimore Committee, the city's leading business group, to draft a report on businesses headed by minorities and women in Baltimore.Schmoke said yesterday that businesses owned by minorities and women "have to move beyond government purchasing and contracting and move to the private sector" if the city's minority communities are ever going to develop strong economic bases.
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NEWS
July 20, 2014
It should come as no surprise that Democrats are looking to women voters for help this fall and plan to use the Hobby Lobby decision - and an assault of women's reproductive rights generally - as part of their rallying cry. In a meeting Friday with The Sun's editorial board, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi made it clear that she expects access to contraception and family planning to be a major issue in Congressional races. Equal pay, paid sick leave, raising the minimum wage and affordable child care are also part of the "When women succeed, America succeeds" mantra - as will job creation, affordable education and rebuilding the nation's infrastructure, Ms. Pelosi acknowledged.
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NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
Long after he hired Dr. Julie A. Freischlag as director of surgery, the dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine kept her resume on his desk. That made it easier to rebut the angry critics who challenged the credentials of the first woman to run one of the country's most prestigious surgical programs. The complaints have dwindled. But nearly three years after Dean Edward D. Miller Jr. stunned Hopkins by selecting her over a popular internal candidate, Freischlag's agenda for making the surgical faculty more hospitable to women continues to make her a symbol of change.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Baltimore's Board of Estimates awarded a $4 million contract for the Uplands redevelopment yesterday to a firm that did not meet city women- and minority-owned business guidelines, passing over two firms that followed the city's policies and causing some elected leaders to ask whether the decision compromises the honesty of Baltimore's bidding process. "It changes the rules," said City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt. "It appears that we don't want to give it to the person who followed all the rules.
NEWS
May 22, 1992
Secretary of Labor Lynn Morley Martin has urged 200 Villa Julie graduates to "find time for a slightly broader agenda" as they pursue personal and professional goals.In a commencement speech yesterday at the Greenspring Valley college, Ms. Martin told students that "the days when America's position as the world's dominant economic power was unquestioned are not here. They are not likely to return."The challenge brings opportunity for young graduates, particularly women and minorities, she said.
NEWS
June 2, 1993
Women and minorities trail white men in most areas of the U.S. Naval Academy's scholastic and military training, according a recently released report by the General Accounting Office.Academy officials responded that the study "rehashes many old findings and previously reported data" because it was based on surveys taken two and three years ago.The GAO report, which was made public April 30, faulted the academy for higher attrition rates among women and minorities. It also found that women and minorities were more likely than their male counterparts to be cited for honor code violations and that their punishment was more severe.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 13, 1991
SHATTERING the "glass ceiling" in corporate America should be even more of a national priority now that an authoritative Bush administration study has shown that women and minorities face barriers in their careers at a far earlier stage than previously believed.The Department of Labor study disclosed that women and minorities are blocked by subtle corporate practices at much lower management levels than heretofore thought. And the careers of minorities were found to plateau much earlier than those of white women, according to Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin.
NEWS
By Andy Trincia and Andy Trincia,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 2, 1991
Beth Chapple, one of the original Pasta Mill partners and founder of 2 Feathers Bar & Grill in Wichita, didn't struggle in the restaurant business because she is a woman.A former employee at Pizza Hut's product-development division, Chapple opened the Pasta Mill in 1988 with co-owner Gary Streepy. She sold her interest in the venture before opening 2 Feathers, a downtown restaurant and bar featuring Southwestern-style cuisine. She sold 2 Feathers to her manager earlier this year.Ms. Chapple, who now has a consulting and food-related service company, says the restaurant world has virtually unlimited opportunities for women and minorities -- from employment to management and ownership.
NEWS
By Staff report | September 27, 1990
Annapolis isn't doing as much business with female-owned firms as city officials had thought.A $339,000 contract the purchasing department had credited to a firm owned by women actually went to Dunton Contracting, whose principal owner is a white man.Purchasing agent Brian Snyder said the city inadvertently credited the contract to a firm with a similar name that is owned by women. "We're human," Snyder said. "That's all I can say. We'll go back and get it right."The error reduced the amount of contracts that went to women in fiscal year 1990 from about $1 million to $672,000, a slight increase over the amount of city money that went to women in fiscal year 1989.
NEWS
May 22, 1992
Secretary of Labor Lynn Morley Martin urged 200 Villa Julie graduates yesterday to "find time for a slightly broader agenda" as they pursue personal and professional goals.In a commencement speech at the Green Spring Valley college, Ms. Martin told students that "the days when America's position as the world's dominant economic power was unquestioned are not here. They are not likely to return."America's economy will be challenged by countries that are "eager to expand their sales beyond their borders.
NEWS
June 4, 2007
MBE program needs a thorough review It's a start that the state Department of Transportation is taking a thorough look at its Minority Business Enterprise Program ("Maryland revamps minority program," May 25). We have all read about possible abuses of the program by unqualified companies seeking MBE status. But most readers are probably not aware that the qualifications for MBE status for nonprofit organizations are difficult and arbitrary. To qualify to participate in the MBE program, a for-profit organization must be run by women or minorities and have assets below a certain level.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | May 12, 2007
The Defense Department has proposed eliminating a written policy that gives "primary consideration" to women and minorities for admission to preparatory schools affiliated with the nation's service academies. But the change may have little effect, defense officials and Naval Academy alumni say, because those institutions have established what they believe is a legal way to give consideration to race and ethnicity in admitting applicants. "I don't think it will hurt that much in getting minorities in," said Jim Jackson, a former academy admissions officer who now helps recruit minorities at Anne Arundel Community College.
NEWS
By Ellis Cose | November 21, 2006
After this month's election, President Bush appeared before a nationally televised audience to acknowledge he had taken a "thumping." Less noticed was the thumping taken by advocates of affirmative action, who could not defeat a Michigan ballot initiative that would prohibit affirmative action in the public sector. The vote was a strong repudiation of the Michigan establishment. Virtually everyone who mattered opposed the measure; still, it passed (58 to 42 percent), along very racially polarized lines.
NEWS
By NANCY FORBES | August 6, 2006
The recent, alarming report by the National Academies of Science on the health of our innovation economy, "Rising Above the Gathering Storm, Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future," did the nation a major service by decrying the dismal state of science and math education in the U.S. and the gradual erosion of our world primacy in science and technology. But the report fell short in one crucial area: It failed to address the persistent shortage of women and minorities in science and engineering.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS AND RICHARD SIMON and MAURA REYNOLDS AND RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats turned up the heat on Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. yesterday, grilling him on his views on abortion and criticizing his membership in a conservative college alumni group. The tough questioning sparked several testy exchanges with the nominee, as well as acrimony between members of the Senate Judiciary Committee. At one point, Alito's wife began crying and left the hearing room as a Republican senator defended the nominee against what the lawmaker said were unfair insinuations.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
Long after he hired Dr. Julie A. Freischlag as director of surgery, the dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine kept her resume on his desk. That made it easier to rebut the angry critics who challenged the credentials of the first woman to run one of the country's most prestigious surgical programs. The complaints have dwindled. But nearly three years after Dean Edward D. Miller Jr. stunned Hopkins by selecting her over a popular internal candidate, Freischlag's agenda for making the surgical faculty more hospitable to women continues to make her a symbol of change.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 17, 1995
Despite almost three decades of affirmative action, the glass ceiling is still an impenetrable barrier to the advancement of women and minorities, a Labor Department report says.Although women and minorities make up two-thirds of the nation's working population, the corporate hierarchy is overwhelmingly male and white, according to a federal Glass Ceiling Commission report released Wednesday.The bipartisan commission reported that 97 percent of the senior managers at 1,500 industrial Fortune 1000 and Fortune 500 corporations are white and almost all of them are men. Only 5 percent of all Fortune 2000 industrial and service company managers are women, and virtually all are white, the report said.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | August 12, 1991
IT SHOULD come as no surprise to anyone that women and minorities are not advancing up the rungs of power that lead to high-profile corporate jobs and BMWs. A visit to any company, or any kind of business operation for that matter, will make it abundantly clear. Black and female and Hispanic faces are certainly visible everywhere now -- and often in locations they had not been a generation ago. But as a society we have become complacent with too little progress -- as if to say: "We let you go to law school and medical school and we let you get your MBA. What more do you want?"
NEWS
May 25, 2005
Diversity program key in promotion of minorities, women Women and minorities rarely have a chance for promotion unless their companies have a diversity program that is enforced - and rewards top management for complying with it. Fifty-nine percent of 530 senior executives polled by the Association of Executive Search Consultants, based in New York, report that their companies have an official "diversity in the workplace" policy. Thirty-four percent said their firms had no diversity programs at all. Seven percent had no idea if their companies had a program or not. Fun is on the missing list at work, author says Are you having fun at work?
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | January 25, 2005
HARVARD PRESIDENT Lawrence H. Summers suggested in a speech that innate differences between the sexes could help explain why fewer women succeed in science and math careers. What he might have meant is, innate differences between the sexes could help explain why the number of senior job offers to women has dropped each year of his three-year presidency at Harvard. He questioned how great a role discrimination plays in keeping female scientists from advancing at elite universities. He might have asked how great a role a balanced lifestyle - family and children as opposed to 80-hour workweeks and ferocious ambition - plays in keeping female scientists from advancing at elite universities.
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