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By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | November 11, 1991
CHICAGO -- In the early 1970s, Carole Leland was the head of a social sciences department at a New York City community college."I was asked to develop a new curriculum that would be responsive to African-American and Puerto Rican students," said Leland, senior program associate for the Center for Creative Leadership's La Jolla, Calif., branch. "I had a group of young, talented and creative Ph.D.s to work with. Using their talent, supporting their work, giving them the needed time and space, we developed a new, effective curriculum that still is in use today."
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 4, 2014
College freshmen are completing their first month on campus. According to the website  The Other Freshman 15 , "The first 15 weeks of college can be the riskiest for sexual assault. ... One out of five students experience rape or sexual assault while they are in college, and in the great majority of cases (75-80 percent), the victim knows the attacker. " The  Washington Post  recently carried a front-page story about campus sexual assaults. As the father of former college students, two of whom are daughters, I was stunned by the presumptions in the story.
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NEWS
February 25, 2007
The six-time Wimbledon women's singles champion commented last week on the decision of the All England Lawn Tennis Club to yield to 21st-century realities and pay women winners at Wimbledon the same as men. "It was a long time coming," she said. "WITH WOMEN AND MEN PAID ON AN EQUAL SCALE, IT DEMONSTRATES TO THE REST OF THE WORLD THAT THIS IS THE RIGHT THING TO DO FOR THE SPORT, THE TOURNAMNET AND THE WORLD." BILLIE JEAN KING
NEWS
April 9, 2013
I read with interest the article "Fight against abuse" (April 5). I applaud any effort to stop the horror of domestic violence. However, I am concerned that the article's content reinforces the old stereotype of men as the aggressors and women as the victims. Men are often the victims of their girlfriends or wives. Ned Holstein and Glenn Sacks ("The violence we ignore," July 16, 2009) cite a 2007 Harvard study that says, "according to both men's and women's accounts, 50 percent of the violence in their relationship was reciprocal (involving both parties)
NEWS
November 30, 1992
FROM A statement by Bishop P. Francis Murphy, auxiliar bishop of Baltimore, in response to the vote earlier this month of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops to table its nine-year effort to write a pastoral letter on women's concerns:"During this past decade of personal discernment in exercising my own responsibility as pastor and teacher, I have found Pope Paul VI's definition of tradition in a letter to Archbishop LeFevre very helpful. He said: 'Tradition is a living reality and not just the material reaffirmation of the past as it was.'"Through [this]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 30, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Medical researchers who receive federal money often flout a federal law that requires them to analyze the effects of new drugs and treatments on women, three new studies have found. Experts say health care for women may suffer as a result because researchers overlook important differences between the sexes in clinical trials evaluating new methods of treating or preventing disease. The conclusions of the three reports are somewhat surprising because the Clinton administration has repeatedly emphasized the importance of women's health and Congress has been prodding the National Institutes of Health to pay more attention to the issue.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
"Beyond Gender," by Betty Friedan. Edited with Brigid O'Farrell. The Woodrow Wilson Press. $22.95.When Betty Friedan's "inner Geiger counter" began ticking loudly in the early 1960s, she wrote "The Feminine Mystique" and touched a spark to the repressed ambition and anger of millions of dissatisfied women. The movement those women created proceeded to challenge the status quo of gender roles and responsibilities and turn conventional wisdom upside down.Friedan's Geiger counter is ticking again.
BUSINESS
By Leslie A. Williams and Leslie A. Williams,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | February 22, 1993
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Is this you?Your boss asks why the report is late. Flustered and apologetic, you take your boss through a long-winded explanation of how busy it has been in the office, never really answering the question.Or later you ask: "I know this is a stupid question, but. . . ."This type of behavior keeps people from being powerful and effective communicators, says Connie Glaser, co-author of "More Power To You!: How Women Can Communicate Their Way to Success."And women often seem to have the most difficulty in asserting their power in the workplace.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Henry Cho says he can run and play basketball all day long, but if he goes to a shopping center with his girlfriend, he'll be "dead in half an hour.""It should be part of a triathlon," he suggests. "Make a guy swim a mile, ride a bike for 30 [miles] and walk through a mall with a girl. Ain't a man alive who can do that."According to social scientists, personal shoppers, marketing researchers and authors who have studied behavioral differences between men and women, Mr. Cho makes a critical point: Many men lack the "shopping gene."
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | February 17, 1991
The Labor Department presented an optimistic view recently of female workers' progress, but not all women were convinced.A report by the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics enthusiastically describes the "extraordinary growth in the participation of women in the work force . . . and the growth in the representation of women in a wide variety of managerial occupations. . . ."Women now constitute 40 percent of all workers in executive, administrative and managerial occupations, up from 20 percent in 1972 and 30 percent in 1980," the report says.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
The father of a young Marine killed in Iraq wept repeatedly in federal court in Baltimore yesterday as a jury watched video images of members of a Kansas church protesting the military's inclusion of homosexuals by picketing his son's Westminster funeral. The videos provided an emotional ending to the evidence portion of the weeklong trial in U.S. District Court. Albert Snyder of York, Pa., the Marine's father, is attempting to be the first in the nation to hold members of Topeka-based Westboro Baptist Church legally liable for their shock protests at military funerals.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
She wasn't looking for it, but there it was. A new and mysterious lump. Theresa Harris found it in her breast one Friday when she was changing her clothes for bed at home in Damascus. And it wasn't just any day. It was the day in July that her sister underwent a double mastectomy to remove her breast cancer and prevent new tumors. Shocked, Harris wondered how much one family should have to endure within 24 hours. But a trip to her gynecologist three long days later and follow-up tests confirmed Harris' lump was not cancer.
NEWS
February 25, 2007
The six-time Wimbledon women's singles champion commented last week on the decision of the All England Lawn Tennis Club to yield to 21st-century realities and pay women winners at Wimbledon the same as men. "It was a long time coming," she said. "WITH WOMEN AND MEN PAID ON AN EQUAL SCALE, IT DEMONSTRATES TO THE REST OF THE WORLD THAT THIS IS THE RIGHT THING TO DO FOR THE SPORT, THE TOURNAMNET AND THE WORLD." BILLIE JEAN KING
NEWS
By RONALD B. MINCY AND HILLARD POUNCY | April 11, 2006
In recent months, Congress made a five-year, $750 million investment in stronger marriages and better parenting by adding healthy marriage and responsible fatherhood programs to its policy arsenal. Legislators and policymakers are betting that efforts to aid children can be enhanced if they help both women and men support and care for their children. And in doing so, they have opened a door through which the federal government can address some of the issues facing a disturbingly large and disaffected population: the millions of young men who are out of school, out of work and simply out of luck of earning a better future for themselves and their families.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | February 6, 2005
WOMEN'S BRAINS work differently from those of men - different sizes, different electrical patterns, different test scores. That much we know is true. But that fact, as interesting and complicating to our lives as it might be, appears to have nothing to do with why more women don't have top jobs in academic science. Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers suggested at a conference in Cambridge, Mass., last month that innate intellectual differences between women and men might be one reason why women are less active than men in areas such as math, physics and engineering.
NEWS
By Carrie Lukas | January 26, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers made a big mistake: He was honest. He reportedly had the temerity to suggest at a conference in Cambridge that innate difference between genders may play a role in the underrepresentation of women among top scientists. The crowd of academics was shocked by this momentary deviation from politically correct dogma. The Washington Post quoted a distraught Nancy Hopkins, biology professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: "I felt I was going to be sick.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
I read with interest the article "Fight against abuse" (April 5). I applaud any effort to stop the horror of domestic violence. However, I am concerned that the article's content reinforces the old stereotype of men as the aggressors and women as the victims. Men are often the victims of their girlfriends or wives. Ned Holstein and Glenn Sacks ("The violence we ignore," July 16, 2009) cite a 2007 Harvard study that says, "according to both men's and women's accounts, 50 percent of the violence in their relationship was reciprocal (involving both parties)
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
Washington -- She opens the door to her room at the posh Jefferson Hotel and two things are instantly clear: One, this is a woman with an attitude, and, two, novelist Terry McMillan takes no prisoners."
NEWS
April 26, 2004
WHAT WOMEN don't know - or don't act upon - can kill them. Lung cancer causes more women to die each year than breast cancer and gynecological cancers combined, with 68,800 deaths last year. And the vast majority of cases are preventable, through lifestyle changes, awareness campaigns and targeted medical care. Some still prefer to think of lung cancer as largely a male affliction, but the number of women falling ill has grown steadily during the last two decades, reflecting the increase in the number of women who have started smoking since the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2004
Cary Grant was born 100 years ago today in Bristol, England. The fantasy life of England, America, and all of planet Earth would never be the same. In his 34-year big-screen career, he epitomized -- and for many, defined -- the man of the world. When Frank Sinatra presented an honorary Oscar in 1970 to Grant "for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting," Sinatra said, with legend-to-legend sympathy, that he earned it "for being Cary Grant." Actually, he earned it for acting Cary Grant: the urban cavalier with a quick tongue and cunning moves.
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