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By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
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FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Two decades before Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg wrote the best-seller "Lean In," urging women to empower themselves at work, a handful of female leaders in Baltimore joined forces to do the same thing. Network 2000, a statewide nonprofit, was launched in 1993 with a mission to promote the advancement of women in executive and leadership positions, and provide them guidance to help them succeed. Over the years, the organization's ranks have grown to 84 members — mostly women — who are, among other things, CEOs, bank presidents, judges, heads of nonprofits and entrepreneurs.
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NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | June 23, 2006
Harford County Sheriff's deputies are seeking information on the whereabouts of nine missing women and girls, including an Aberdeen resident who disappeared days after four other women were attacked or killed in the area, police said. Jennifer Lynn Blankenship, 25, of the 100 block of Spesutia Road, was last seen June 4, two days after Sheila Ann Turner, 42, was found dead in a field in Perryman. Another woman - Lillian Abramowicz Phelps of Elkton - was found dead two weeks later, and two other women told police they were choked and left for dead in secluded locations, as well.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 7, 2014
Women will compete in the ski jump for the first time ever in the Winter Olympics Tuesday. Don't blink, you might miss it. While the men will compete on both hills and in team competition this week, the women will take only one day to jump from the smaller hill. But it is a big leap for womankind, the culmination of a long legal battle. Though men have competed in ski jumping since the first Winter Games in 1924, and though women are allowed to compete in bobsled, luge and ice hockey, the International Olympic Committee had refused to let women ski jump in the games until now. Why?
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 11, 1996
They call themselves the Company of Women. But they're girls at heart.Founded six years ago in Boston, the Company of Women is based on the combined principles of Kristin Linklater, a nationally recognized vocal coach, and Carol Gilligan, a research psychologist whose work focuses on studies of women and girls.The company, which was in residence at Goucher College last month and returns there to perform in September, has a twofold mission: 1) It produces all-female productions of Shakespeare's plays, and 2)
NEWS
By JANET FLEISCHMAN | July 26, 2006
Twenty-five years into the AIDS epidemic and halfway through the initial phase of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, there is increasing international consensus about the need to target women and girls. One area where the U.S. could make a real difference in women's lives has until recently been largely overlooked: integrating HIV/AIDS and reproductive health services. This presents important new opportunities for the U.S. AIDS program to become more effective and sustainable.
NEWS
By Benjamin L. Cardin | February 19, 2010
V iolence against women is a global epidemic, threatening the lives and safety of women and girls around the world. Today, one out of every three women worldwide will be physically or sexually abused during her lifetime, with rates reaching 70 percent in some countries. These are horrifying statistics. As chairman of the U.S. Helsinki Commission and a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, I recently joined efforts to tackle this egregious problem by co-sponsoring the International Violence Against Women Act. Violence against women ranges from gang rape to domestic violence and from acid burnings to so-called honor killings.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
A RECENT report on sexual abuse and exploitation of civilian women and girls by United Nations peacekeepers demands quick and unequivocal action by the organization's full assembly. The world body should adopt comprehensive recommendations made in the report, including prosecution of perpetrators by their home countries and on-site courts-martial in the countries where mission members served. The U.N. report verifies a deeply troubling and widespread problem that first came to light last year with allegations of rape and other abuses by peacekeeping personnel in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where some 63 implicated peacekeepers have been expelled and where 106 other cases of abuse, including gang rape, are being investigated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - The government should encourage women and girls to reduce the amount of meat, whole milk and other fatty foods they eat as a way of protecting themselves and their offspring from dioxins, harmful residues of natural and industrial combustion, an expert panel said yesterday. The Institute of Medicine, a nonprofit health policy advisory body, recommended that the government do more to educate women and girls about limiting consumption of dioxins, which can be passed through the placenta to a fetus or through breast milk to an infant.
FEATURES
By Raymond M. Lane, For The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
"I flew a mother and two young daughters, probably 4 and 7 years old, and as we took off I heard this shrieking from the back of the plane," said Lin Caywood, a 12-year pilot. A mother and recent grandmother herself, Caywood thought the kids were upset about the flight, and banked to circle back to Frederick Municipal Airport for a quick landing to calm the hysterical children. "Then I caught a look at them, and they weren't upset," said Caywood, a Baltimore native and graduate of Poolesville High and Hood College.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 18, 2013
March is Women's History Month, but the headlines give us little to celebrate. Women who dare to attend protests in Egypt are routinely beaten and subjected to brutal "virginity tests. " Girls in Afghanistan are beaten or disfigured for attending school. Infant girls are poisoned or abandoned to die in India and China because they are a burden to the family. Honor killings, the forced marriage of young girls to older men, the rape of virgins in Africa because they do not carry the AIDS virus - the list of horrors goes on and on. Indeed, as much of the developing world is shaken awake by democratic movements or plain old capitalism, the lives of women, made so clear to those of us in the West because of the globalization of news, seem to be trapped in amber.
FEATURES
By Raymond M. Lane, For The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
"I flew a mother and two young daughters, probably 4 and 7 years old, and as we took off I heard this shrieking from the back of the plane," said Lin Caywood, a 12-year pilot. A mother and recent grandmother herself, Caywood thought the kids were upset about the flight, and banked to circle back to Frederick Municipal Airport for a quick landing to calm the hysterical children. "Then I caught a look at them, and they weren't upset," said Caywood, a Baltimore native and graduate of Poolesville High and Hood College.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman , The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
Advance registration is now open for those who want to help Ocean City set a record for the world's longest bikini parade. The Guinness World Record is now held by Panama City Beach, Fla., which stole it from Australia back in the spring. The folks Down Under plan to recapture the record with an event in October, so O.C. will really have to bring it. For the win, the town needs more than 450 women, teens and girls to show up in their two-piece swimsuits for the Aug. 25 event, part of the Uptown Beach Bash, a newly launched three-day festival feature art shows, music, food, a paddleboard regatta and a bike stunt show.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 15, 2010
Those of us who read Khaled Hosseini's novel, "A Thousand Splendid Suns" were certain that the unendurable trials of the women at the center of that book were more fact than fiction. The writing of the author, an Afghan-born American doctor, had the unmistakable ring of truth. As if to confirm the dark suspicion that Afghan women did indeed live lives of terrible abuse at the hands of their own parents as well as at the hands of the husbands chosen for them, Alissa Rubin of The New York Times wrote last week that Afghan women are setting themselves on fire in a desperate attempt to escape their fates.
NEWS
By Benjamin L. Cardin | February 19, 2010
V iolence against women is a global epidemic, threatening the lives and safety of women and girls around the world. Today, one out of every three women worldwide will be physically or sexually abused during her lifetime, with rates reaching 70 percent in some countries. These are horrifying statistics. As chairman of the U.S. Helsinki Commission and a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, I recently joined efforts to tackle this egregious problem by co-sponsoring the International Violence Against Women Act. Violence against women ranges from gang rape to domestic violence and from acid burnings to so-called honor killings.
NEWS
November 16, 2008
Student artwork to be auctioned Saturday The Columbia Association's Teen Advisory Committee invites Howard County students to submit artwork to be sold at a student auction and fundraiser, to be held from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at Columbia Art Center, 6100 Foreland Garth, Columbia. Fifty percent of the proceeds will go to the artist; 50 percent to Smile Train, a charity providing free surgery for poor children in developing countries in need of cleft palate or lip repair. The charity also provides training for doctors and other medical professionals.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | September 21, 2009
The list of sins against women in the United States is long. We still badly lag our male counterparts in pay. We just about outnumber men in college but are only a fraction of the bosses in business. We just about outnumber men in law school, too. But there are only two women on the Supreme Court. We work outside the home but still handle most of the chores in it. We are in regular danger of having our reproductive rights revoked. Our daughters are muscled out of the way in science classes.
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