Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWomen And Children
IN THE NEWS

Women And Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | March 31, 1995
DOES IT make any difference when women are elected to Congress? That's a question we get asked all the time.Something that recently happened in the House may be instructive. Republican women used their newfound numbers -- there are now 17 of them -- to convince their leadership to change the welfare bill to benefit single mothers. New Jersey's Marie Roukema, now the senior Republican woman in the House, has been pushing for years for stricter federal enforcement of laws requiring absent parents (90 percent of them fathers)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 3, 2014
Thank you to William L. Jacobsen Jr. for his commentary in The Baltimore Sun ( "President Hillary Clinton," July 31). As a woman reader of The Sun, I'm feeling as though this commentary is the first draft for one to be written on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. I'm also feeling that the same lingo about President Barack Obama will be a tagline for Ms. Clinton. If we didn't want Barack Obama to become president of the United States we are racist. If we don't want Hilary Clinton to be president of the United States we are misogynists.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Time and again yesterday, people who work with Baltimore's neediest residents underscored the need for broadening the scope of services to an increasing number of homeless women and children.Bureaucrats and advocates who gathered for a forum on homelessness at Sojourner-Douglass College in East Baltimore stressed the need for additional family shelters and services such as counseling and job training."Many of the jobs available today are beyond the level of people coming to us," said Jacki Coyle, assistant director of Our Daily Bread, a downtown soup kitchen run by Catholic Charities that serves 600 to 950 lunches a day.Coyle said that every month, her organization is seeing a 10 percent increase in women and children seeking assistance.
NEWS
June 5, 2014
As a former assistant attorney general in the Child Protection Unit, an advocate for victims of domestic violence, a mother and a woman, I know what it takes to keep our children and families safe. In particular, I know firsthand that we need to arm our state prosecutors with a full array of tools to fight predators including tougher sentences for the worst offenders, new crimes that keep pace with technology and increased victim services. With Maryland's primary election less than four weeks away, getting each candidate's public safety record into the public discourse should be our main concern.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 2001
NEW YORK-A weary and defensive former Sen. Bob Kerrey expressed remorse again yesterday for the Navy SEAL action he led in Vietnam in 1969 that he insisted inadvertently killed a dozen or more Vietnamese women and children. But Kerrey said he does not intend to return the Bronze Star medal he received for the night action against a village he said was designated as a "free-fire zone" and that intelligence reports said contained enemy fighters. "We fired because we were fired on," he said at a news conference called to respond to a torrent of questions from the press.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- As many as 50,000 women and children from Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe are brought to the United States under false pretenses each year and forced to work as prostitutes, abused laborers or servants, according to a CIA report that is the government's first comprehensive assessment of the problem. The exhaustively researched, 79-page agency report -- "International Trafficking in Women to the United States: A Contemporary Manifestation of Slavery" -- paints a broad picture of this hidden trade and of the difficulties that government agencies face in fighting it. Law enforcement officials have seen episodic evidence for years of trafficking in immigrant women and children, some as young as 9. But the report says that officers generally do not like to take on these slavery cases because they are difficult to investigate.
TOPIC
By Tim Giago (Nanwica Kciji) and Tim Giago (Nanwica Kciji),LAKOTA MEDIA INC | December 28, 2003
WOUNDED KNEE, S.D. -- On crystal-clear nights, when winter winds whistle through the hills and canyons around Wounded Knee Creek, the Lakota elders say it is so cold that one can hear the twigs snapping in the frigid air. They called this time of the year "the Moon of the Popping Trees." It was on such a winter morning on Dec. 29, 1890, that the crack of a single rifle brought a day of infamy that still lives in the hearts and minds of the Lakota people. After the rifle spoke there was a pause and then the rifles and Hotchkiss guns of the 7th Cavalry opened up on the men, women and children camped at Wounded Knee.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 17, 1996
BEL AIR -- A facility for homeless women and children will be dedicated today at a 9 a.m. ceremony to be attended by Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann and Archbishop William Cardinal Keeler.Anna's House, managed by Catholic Charities, will provide transitional housing for homeless women and their children. The location is not being disclosed to protect residents' privacy.Pub Date: 10/17/96
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Susan Reimer seems extremely misguided; her sympathy for Sgt. Robert Bales, who massacred men, women and children, is an enigma to me ("War makes you crazy, both there and here," March 26). But since these are her feelings, why is she ashamed to admit them? Geraldine Segal, Randallstown
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1997
Baltimore's homeless shelters are operating at capacity and have been forced to turn away people even though this winter's coldest weather is still ahead, according to a survey released yesterday.The survey by Action for the Homeless found that every shelter serving women and children in Baltimore was filled and that most shelters reported turning people away in recent weeks.The Dec. 1 telephone survey did not collect specific data on the numbers of homeless being turned away from Baltimore's 30 shelters.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 22, 2014
Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson declared an unconditional war on poverty, and he put Sargent Shriver in charge of leading the fight. Since then, by some estimates, we have reduced the number of poor in this country from one in four to about one in six. But more than 46 million Americans continue to live below the poverty line and more than half of them - 25 million - are women and children. Today Mr. Shriver's daughter, Maria, continues her father's campaign with a new report on women on the cusp of poverty, about whom she writes, "Many of these women feel they are a single incident - one broken bone, one broken-down car, one missed paycheck - away from the brink.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
For minutes on end New Year's Eve night, the names and ages of 216 men, women and children who were killed in Baltimore in 2012 were read out loud on the steps of the city's War Memorial — a somber recap of a violent year in which homicides rose. "In a city where so many people are immune to these senseless crimes, it is imperative that we remember the victims," said Victoria Kent, a member of the Baltimore Guardian Angels community watch group, as about 50 others stood by. The vigil, in its fourth year, was attended by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, council members Brandon Scott and Carl Stokes, members of the clergy and various city activists.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Susan Reimer seems extremely misguided; her sympathy for Sgt. Robert Bales, who massacred men, women and children, is an enigma to me ("War makes you crazy, both there and here," March 26). But since these are her feelings, why is she ashamed to admit them? Geraldine Segal, Randallstown
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
The Italian liner Costa Concordia, with 4,200 passengers aboard, piled up in January on the rocky shoreline of Tuscany, tearing out its bottom and capsizing. The death toll has risen to 25, with the recovery of eight more bodies last week. Seven people remain missing. Capt. Francesco Schettino, the Costa Concordia's master, violated one of the noblest and most sacred traditions of the sea when he did not direct the evacuation of passengers and crew. There can be nothing more terrifying for passengers than to see crew members going over the side, as has been alleged by disaster survivors, who described a scene of panic and confusion.
NEWS
By Maureen Black and David Paige | May 12, 2011
Congress' recent efforts to balance the federal budget give new meaning to "women and children first. " The $500 million cut to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) that President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans agreed to as part of last month's budget deal pushes the nation's fiscal concerns onto the shoulders of babies. Because WIC actually reduces health care costs, it is not clear why it has been targeted for cuts. Economic analysis from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
An international relief organization based in Carroll County has re-established primary health care, battled disease and built basic infrastructure that will help ensure the health of nearly 8 million people in the remotest areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo. IMA World Health, headquartered in New Windsor, has released the results of its four-year project in the central African country, an effort funded with more than $40 million in U.S. aid. According to the group, the project trained more than 33,000 native health care workers, vaccinated nearly 1 million children and delivered treatment that has saved countless lives.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
The recent decision by the Baltimore YWCA to close its downtown shelter for homeless women and children is more than unfortunate. If the shelter goes out of business by Oct. 1, as announced, about 10 percent of the city's temporary beds for families could be lost. There's no question that permanent housing is the ultimate solution for getting the homeless off the streets. But in the meantime, families must not be left without a place to go. On any given night, an estimated 3,000 people in Baltimore are homeless; about 35 percent consist of families, usually women and children.
NEWS
June 5, 2014
As a former assistant attorney general in the Child Protection Unit, an advocate for victims of domestic violence, a mother and a woman, I know what it takes to keep our children and families safe. In particular, I know firsthand that we need to arm our state prosecutors with a full array of tools to fight predators including tougher sentences for the worst offenders, new crimes that keep pace with technology and increased victim services. With Maryland's primary election less than four weeks away, getting each candidate's public safety record into the public discourse should be our main concern.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
Fabienne Doucet is haunted by the stories of the women and children she has met who are still living in camps one year after an earthquake reduced the island nation of Haiti to rubble. There's the former accounting student who apologizes for crying as she describes being gang-raped by four men. There's the young girl who was beaten so brutally she can no longer have children. And there's the mother who was so grateful to receive clothing for her babies that she insisted on washing Doucet's feet.
SPORTS
By Kaitlyn Carr, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2010
On Mondays, Fearon Wright serves food and drink to homeless women at a Baltimore shelter. On Wednesdays and Thursdays, he puts on football pads and a helmet at a Mariners indoor football practice. Now, as the undefeated team makes a run for the American Indoor Football Association championship, Wright manages to find time for the women and children of Sarah's Hope in Sandtown-Winchester because of one woman -- his mom. "I'm always conscious of my mom and how hard she works for us," said Wright, who played seven games with the Minnesota Vikings in 2001 before he was sidelined with a shoulder injury.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.