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By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
First the restaurant and now the gift shop. The Woman's Industrial Exchange, which has served chicken salad and tomato aspic to generations of Baltimoreans from its North Charles Street storefront, has shuttered its craft shop at the same location with a promise to reopen early next month. "This is a bump in the road," said Helen Weiss, president of the volunteer board that runs the Exchange, which got its start in 1880. "I am confident that we will reopen bigger and better, and brighter and shinier."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2008
The Dogwood Cafe 333 N. Charles St., 410-962-8560. Hours: 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Monday-Friday Eating a locally grown lunch from a brown bag has become easier for downtown dwellers now that the Dogwood Cafe has taken over the food operations of the Woman's Industrial Exchange on North Charles Street. It is open only on weekdays and only for lunch. While the restaurant, which officially opened this month, is still adding features, customers can order soup, sandwiches and salads as takeout fare or order food at the counter, then sit at the few tables in the rear of the building.
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NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2002
The Woman's Industrial Exchange has been at North Charles and Pleasant streets since 1887 - long before anyone heard of business buzzwords like SWOT analyses, back when marketing meant riding your horse and cart to town. But the venerable institution - part consignment shop, bakery and restaurant - is now looking to just those sorts of newfangled strategies to improve its chances of surviving another century. In an unlikely partnership, the Exchange is receiving free consulting advice from a half-dozen graduate students at the Johns Hopkins School of Professional Studies in Business and Education, who have spent the past few months poring over the Exchange's operations and financial records.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
Her glass of champagne stood next to a platter laden with chocolate treats and miniature cupcakes as Shari Rolando turned toward the oval stand-alone mirror and surveyed the ivory gown. She swished to her left and then right, stepped away and walked back up, examining the dress with a square neckline and bodice beadwork. "I think I like the other one better," Rolando said to her friend Filipa Goarmon. It was the seventh or eighth gown the Middle River resident tried on yesterday afternoon in a large upstairs room of the Woman's Industrial Exchange, searching for the one that screamed "perfect" for her October wedding in Chicago.
NEWS
By Molly Baldwin and Molly Baldwin,Sun Staff | October 1, 2000
Friends, food and fun all describe the first American Girls Pastimes Party to be held at the Woman's Industrial Exchange Saturday and Sunday. Girls, along with their mothers, grandmothers and even their American Girl dolls, are invited to attend the event, which celebrates the popular pastimes of each character in the American Girls collection. There will be five shows, each lasting about two hours, and the activities include crafts, games, puzzles, shadow plays and refreshments. One of the goals is to help guests learn how girls throughout history spent leisure time.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
Folks who know and love it cherish the anachronisms of Baltimore's Woman's Industrial Exchange: The ladies' lunches, the hand-crafted baby items, the suggestions of a kinder, gentler way of life. Making the 19th-century nonprofit a vibrant part of the 21st century, however, has proven challenging. How do you freshen the fare without sacrificing the charm of the original recipe? After closing for 11 months, the North Charles Street institution opened its doors again this week, much the better for its extensive kitchen and lunch room renovation.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
The Woman's Industrial Exchange's cook releases one of her guarded secrets: "I put a little pinch of sugar in everything, even the shrimp salad."It's a sweetness that spills all over the exchange, in the taste of her yeast rolls, the miniature roses on the smocked girls' dresses or the kindly manners of the tearoom's waitress corps.It is the plain and reassuring cooking of Dorothea Day Wilson that beckons a following back and back again to the exchange, which will reopen today at Charles and Pleasant streets after being closed for a month.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Once unthinkable, hip modernity is arriving at a venerable downtown lunch spot: a plasma TV, a chartreuse paint scheme, chipotle mayo and self-service. The Woman's Industrial Exchange's former tearoom, for more than a century a genteel and leisurely midday rendezvous for a petite platter of chicken salad, tomato aspic, deviled egg and lemon tart, reopens Oct. 18 as the Chef's Express. The color scheme is "city chartreuse" and "fresh pear," with an exposed stainless-steel kitchen. The new restaurant's operators promise a plasma TV tuned to food channels.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2004
Anne Hawkins' knitting warms twice. Through the broadcasts of Howard Dean's scream and the New Hampshire primary returns, in movie theaters, on road trips and in her Catonsville living room, the 77-year-old woman knits nubby sweaters, soft blankets and stylish scarves to sell at Baltimore's Woman's Industrial Exchange. For the past 12 years, she has signed over every check for her work to charity - most recently the Fuel Fund of Maryland, which helps the poor pay utility bills, and Beacon House, a nonprofit organization for women and children in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2008
The Dogwood Cafe 333 N. Charles St., 410-962-8560. Hours: 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Monday-Friday Eating a locally grown lunch from a brown bag has become easier for downtown dwellers now that the Dogwood Cafe has taken over the food operations of the Woman's Industrial Exchange on North Charles Street. It is open only on weekdays and only for lunch. While the restaurant, which officially opened this month, is still adding features, customers can order soup, sandwiches and salads as takeout fare or order food at the counter, then sit at the few tables in the rear of the building.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
Anne Hawkins, who sold sweaters and blankets she knitted and then signed the checks over to charity, died of emphysema Dec. 14 at Charlestown Retirement Community. She was 79. A retired bookkeeper and accountant, she savored liberal Democratic politics and social causes. After moving to Baltimore in 1991, she found she could sell her knitting at the Woman's Industrial Exchange, and she gave the proceeds to charities such as the Salvation Army, the Fuel Fund of Maryland and Beacon House in Washington, D.C. "She didn't suffer fools and hated sloppy sentimentalism," said her husband, John Hawkins, a retired public school math teacher.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2005
Is that fresh pear or city chartreuse?" asks Jerry Edwards, as he paces about the Woman's Industrial Exchange. It's a few days before the Baltimore landmark's restaurant reopens under Edwards' management and the chef appears rather dazed by a vibrant green color his in-house designer, Travis Lee Moore, selected for what were the restaurant's formerly gray walls. "We were dying when Travis first put it up," Edwards says with a smile. "But we needed a color attack here." Attack is a favorite word of his; infuse is another.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Once unthinkable, hip modernity is arriving at a venerable downtown lunch spot: a plasma TV, a chartreuse paint scheme, chipotle mayo and self-service. The Woman's Industrial Exchange's former tearoom, for more than a century a genteel and leisurely midday rendezvous for a petite platter of chicken salad, tomato aspic, deviled egg and lemon tart, reopens Oct. 18 as the Chef's Express. The color scheme is "city chartreuse" and "fresh pear," with an exposed stainless-steel kitchen. The new restaurant's operators promise a plasma TV tuned to food channels.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
Lucette Keelty Costa, a homemaker and former board president of the Woman's Industrial Exchange, died of lung disease Sunday at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. She was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ten Hills, Lucette Keelty was a 1938 graduate of Mount de Sales Academy of the Visitation and studied painting at Georgian Court College in Lakewood, N.J. Mrs. Costa volunteered for many years at the Johns Hopkins and Union Memorial hospitals, and was board president of the Woman's Industrial Exchange on Charles Street about 40 years ago. Family members said she persuaded Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro Jr. to install a Christmas tree at the Washington Monument in Mount Vernon Place in the 1950s.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Rita Marie Hegarty Knox, a longtime Baltimore resident and former manager of the Woman's Industrial Exchange, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. She was 84. A native of Philadelphia, Rita Marie Hegarty graduated from Notre Dame Academy in Philadelphia in 1938. She moved to Baltimore in 1942 when she married Elmer Vincent Knox, a bridge, structural and ornamental ironworker who died in 1981. She moved to Towson four years ago. After raising five children, she returned to school and received an associate's degree in gerontology in 1978 from Baltimore City Community College.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
First the restaurant and now the gift shop. The Woman's Industrial Exchange, which has served chicken salad and tomato aspic to generations of Baltimoreans from its North Charles Street storefront, has shuttered its craft shop at the same location with a promise to reopen early next month. "This is a bump in the road," said Helen Weiss, president of the volunteer board that runs the Exchange, which got its start in 1880. "I am confident that we will reopen bigger and better, and brighter and shinier."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1999
With its aura of being displaced from an earlier time, the Abell Room of the 117-year-old Woman's Industrial Exchange seems the ideal place for a talk on family history and genealogy.The Abell Room has the look of being decorated by a turn-of-the-century Baltimore eccentric, with the ceiling unaccountably covered with wallpaper patterned with Eastern song birds, a gallery of photographs of generations of working women and a portrait of an early president watching over it all from above a townhouse mantel.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening SunThe Sun The Sunday Sun | March 2, 1991
The Woman's Industrial Exchange, 333 N. Charles St., 685-4388. The Tea Room at The Woman's Industrial Exchange offers a lot of flavor -- in both the food and the surroundings. Open weekdays for breakfast and lunch, the Tea Room serves plain good food at reasonable prices and boasts the best chicken salad in town. The decor goes back a few decades with the classic black-and-white tile floor as the one standout. The service is efficient and friendly. Don't plan to linger here, but do plan to stay long enough for a piece of homemade pie. $inexpensive.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2005
The final lunch patrons arrived hungry, in search of those elusive yeasty rolls, the waitresses attired in aprons with big bows and of course, the tomato aspic they'd known since the days when Charles Street had two-way traffic. They were emphatic that Charles and Pleasant streets' bastion of old-style cooking needs to reopen. Roslyn DuPree, the restaurateur who had operated the Woman's Industrial Exchange's tea room since late 2003, withdrew this week after noting declining patronage.
NEWS
By Heather L. Goddard and Heather L. Goddard,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
Jonathon Scott Fuqua, an award-winning children's book author who lives in Baltimore, will discuss his new novel, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, Thursday at a fund-raiser for the Woman's Industrial Exchange. The Willoughby Spit Wonder (Candlewick Press, $15.99), Fuqua's third novel for young readers, is set in 1953 in the Chesapeake region of Virginia. Carter Johnson thinks if he swims across the entire bay through a hurricane, then maybe his dying father will be inspired to beat death as well.
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