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January 27, 2006
Jan. 27-- 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria. 1973: The Vietnam peace accords were signed in Paris.
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Live Arts Maryland music director J. Ernest Green conducted the Annapolis Chorale Chamber Chorus, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists last weekend in performances of works by three of the world's finest composers, filling St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis with glorious sound. Stellar music is a Green hallmark, but he also knows how to entertain and inform - as is his custom, the conductor gave audience members insight into his musical choices, exploring the common musical thread uniting the three pieces on the program: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Vesperae solennes de confessore," Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Keyboard Concerto in E-major and Anton Bruckner's Requiem in D-minor.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2000
Two contrasting works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart will be performed by the Annapolis Chorale at Maryland Hall at 8 p.m. Saturday. For rollicking good fun, there is the Concerto for Bassoon, to be conducted by J. Ernest Green and played by the chorale's chamber orchestra and soloist Danny Phipps, principal bassoon of the Air Force Band, which has its headquarters in Washington. A graduate of Philadelphia's Curtis Institute and Catholic University, Phipps, a faculty member at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Va., is one of the region's most-sought-after bassoonists.
NEWS
May 17, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/ * What's the scientific name for Monarch butterflies? * To which era of music does Frederick Chopin belong? * What's the value of the beads in the upper deck of an abacus? BUG OUT The whole world is bugging out. There are millions of busy, crawling, munching creatures all over the planet, so you may as well get in on the invasion. Buzz over to www.insecta-inspecta.com and join the cyber-colony of insect maniacs.
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 3, 1991
Since his death 200 years ago this week, music lovers have wondered what killed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.Physicians and musicologists have their pet culprits: strep, rheumatic fever or even poisoning at the hand of Antonio Salieri, the jealous court composer.Now a British researcher has a new theory -- Mozart was a victim of his own physician and the primitive medicine of his day.Dr. Ian James of London's Royal Free Hospital advanced the lTC idea at a recent meeting of the British Association for Performing Arts of Medicine, according to the current issue of Physician's Weekly.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2001
Annapolis and San Diego share the distinction of being the sailing capitals of their respective coasts. This weekend, they'll be sharing a conductor as well. Donald Barra, the founding music director of the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, will be in town tomorrow and Saturday evenings to guest-conduct the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in a program of Mozart, Haydn, Kodaly and Corigliano. A product of Eastern institutions like Columbia University and the Eastman and Juilliard Schools of Music, Barra has become quite a musical presence in San Diego.
FEATURES
August 17, 1999
When you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/1. What was Wolfgang's sister's name?2. At the current rate, when might the rain forests disappear?3. How should teens deal with sports injuries? (Go to http://www.kidshealth.org to find out.)HANG AROUND WITH WOLFGANGIf you want your day to end on a high note, try tickling the ivories with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (you know, the child genius who went on to become one of the world's greatest musical composers)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | November 6, 1992
It's been an autumn of wedding bells in the Anne Arundel arts community.First came the union between Dick Gessner's Broadway Corner and T. G. Cooper's Pamoja ensemble.The result was a delightful "Dreamgirls" over at Gessner's U.S. 50 nightclub.Now, the county's two premier classical music organizations, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra and the Annapolis Chorale, are about to tie the knot with a pair of weekend concerts featuring Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's valedictory work, the "Requiem.""It's always important to do collaborations like this one," explains ASO conductor Gisele Ben-Dor, "because so much excitement is added to the local arts scene, especially when the chorus is as attentive and well-prepared as this one. In fact, I'd like to make this an annual event."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
FEATURES
January 27, 2006
Jan. 27-- 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria. 1973: The Vietnam peace accords were signed in Paris.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 22, 2006
Soave il vento ... Maybe the wind be gentle, the waves calm ... To understand the genius and ineffable artistry of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, this week's 250th birthday boy, you need only hear about three minutes -- the time it takes to listen to the Trio from Cosi fan tutte, his mostly comic opera about love, fidelity, expectations (realistic and unrealistic), sex and the sexes. The Trio is sung in the first act by the somewhat silly, but ever-so-charming ladies Dorabella and Fiordiligi and the worldly-wise Don Alfonso.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2002
During the recent commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the Sept. 11 tragedy, one masterwork of the choral music canon made history as the vehicle for mankind's first "Rolling Requiem." That piece, performed sequentially across many of the world's time zones by musicians honoring those who sustained loss in the terrorist attacks, was the Requiem Mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as he himself was dying in the late autumn of 1791. "It's a profound piece of music," says Frances Motyca Dawson, whose Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will open its 26th season Saturday evening at Jim Rouse Theatre with Mozart's grand setting of the Roman Catholic liturgy for the dead.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2002
"Song," said the French writer-statesman Francois Rene de Chateaubriand, "is the daughter of prayer." And as prayerful introspection takes hold tomorrow in commemoration of the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, song will figure prominently in the ritual of tribute. Beginning at the international date line and radiating outward, performances of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's choral Requiem will begin in the world's various time zones at 8:46 a.m., the moment of the first attack on the World Trade Center.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 2002
A host of complementary forces will come together Saturday evening at the Jim Rouse Theatre when the Columbia Orchestra takes the stage to present a concert program titled "Mozart and More." To begin with, there's the juxtaposition of Franz Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the two bulwarks of music's classical age whose works will be performed. Haydn, tradition tells us, was so bowled over by the genius displayed by his junior colleague that he told papa Leopold Mozart, also a composer, that young Wolfgang would eclipse them both before he was through.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 2002
A host of complementary forces will come together Saturday evening at the Jim Rouse Theatre when the Columbia Orchestra takes the stage to present a concert program titled "Mozart and More." To begin with, there's the juxtaposition of Franz Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the two bulwarks of music's classical age whose works will be performed. Haydn, tradition tells us, was so bowled over by the genius displayed by his junior colleague that he told papa Leopold Mozart, also a composer, that young Wolfgang would eclipse them both before he was through.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and By Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 2001
"I like an aria to fit a singer as perfectly as a well-tailored suit of clothes," said a 22-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart's flair for vocal fashion was on display at the St. John's College Great Hall this week, when the Annapolis Opera presented a quartet of talented young singers in a program of excerpts from some of Mozart's greatest works for the musical stage. The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, The Magic Flute and the less famous but still wonderful Abduction from the Seraglio were the opera scores represented, along with the chirpy "Alleluia" from Mozart's most famous motet, Exsultate, jubilate.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2001
Annapolis and San Diego share the distinction of being the sailing capitals of their respective coasts. This weekend, they'll be sharing a conductor as well. Donald Barra, the founding music director of the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, will be in town tomorrow and Saturday evenings to guest-conduct the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in a program of Mozart, Haydn, Kodaly and Corigliano. A product of Eastern institutions like Columbia University and the Eastman and Juilliard Schools of Music, Barra has become quite a musical presence in San Diego.
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