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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 27, 1994
The curious and controversial sale of WNUV (Channel 54) to a Pittsburgh businessman and the 69-year-old mother of the four brothers who own WBFF (Channel 45) has taken another turn. The sale has been called off.An application filed in August with the Federal Communications Commission sought transfer of WNUV's license from ABRY Communications of Boston to a local company headed by Carolyn C. Smith and Edwin L. Edwards Sr. The application has been withdrawn, said Andrew Banks, co-director of ABRY.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | August 14, 2012
DISH subscribers could lose access to WBFF and WNUV (Channels 45 and 54) at midnight Wednesday in a disagreement over retransmission fees. "Based on current state of negotiations, there's a risk DISH won't be carrying us after midnight Wednesday," Barry Faber, executive vice president for Sinclair Broadcast Group,  said this morning. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by Sinclair, which is based in Hunt Valley. "We're hopeful, we'll get a deal, but we're also realistic," he added, saying that Sinclair wants to keep viewers informed.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
A Pittsburgh entrepreneur has completed his two-year drive to take over WNUV-TV (Channel 54) in Baltimore, after a rival station dropped an appeal to the Federal Communications Commission to block the deal.A company controlled by Edwin L. Edwards Sr., Baltimore WNUV-TV Licensee Inc., closed on its purchase of the station July 24, according to a letter from the company's lawyers to the FCC, which the commission released yesterday. Terms were not disclosed.The owners of WMAR-TV (Channel 2) had challenged the sale, claiming it violated FCC rules barring a single company from owning two FCC licenses for TV stations in the same city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
Verizon and Sinclair Broadcast Group have reached an agreement, according to Bill Fanshawe, general manager of Baltimore's WBFF and WNUV television stations. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by the Hunt Valley based broadcaster. "We have settled," Fanshawe said late Thursday. "So, we are pleased to announce that we have reached an agreemnent in principle for a new deal that will provide for continued carriage of our stations on the FiOS systems after December 31st, 2011. " What that means immediately is that the crawls across the bottom of the screen warning FiOS viewers that they might not be able to see "Glee" and NFL football games after Dec. 31, are history.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 3, 1992
You could call it "The Case of the Dogged Defender." Truly devoted mystery buffs may welcome a four-film run of "Perry Mason" movies airing Sunday on WNUV-Channel 54.Beginning at noon, the films include "Perry Mason Returns," "The Case of the Notorious Nun," "The Case of the Shooting Star," and "The Case of the Lost Love."So here are some trivia items from the case file on writer Erle Stanley Gardner's famous defense attorney:* The first movie came out in 1985, with Raymond Burr returning to the role 10 years after his successful 1967-75 run as wheelchair-bound police detective "Ironside."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | August 21, 1993
WNUV (Channel 54) has a new owner.Eddie Edwards, owner of Pittsburgh's WPTT and one of the few African-American owners of a TV station in the country, has signed an agreement to buy WNUV from ABRY Communications of Boston and has obtained the option on a Milwaukee station from Gaylord Broadcasting of Oklahoma City.ABRY, which manages the Milwaukee station for Gaylord, said in a news release that the purchase price for the two stations exceeds $100 million."I'm just happy that this has happened," Edwards told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 14, 1993
The owner of WMAR-TV (Channel 2) is asking the federal government to step in and stop the sale of WNUV-TV (Channel 54) to a Pittsburgh broadcasting executive.Scripps Howard Broadcasting alleges that the four Smith brothers, who own WBFF (Channel 45), are using Eddie Edwards Sr., an African-American who owns WPTT in Pittsburgh, and their mother, Mrs. Carolyn Smith, in a plan to take control of WNUV.The arrangement, according to Scripps Howard, would give the Smith family control of Baltimore's only two independent TV stations in violation of the Federal Communication Commission's "duopoly" rule, which prohibits anyone from owning more than one TV station in a market.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 2006
The CW network, which is being launched this fall, will be broadcast in Baltimore on WNUV (Channel 54). The fledgling network is being formed by the merger of two underachieving broadcast operations, UPN and WB, and will target viewers 18 to 34 years old. Its fall lineup, which will be announced this month, is expected to include the WB's Gilmore Girls and UPN's America's Next Top Model. Managed by the Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group, WNUV is the Baltimore affiliate for the WB network, and although the CW startup was announced in January, no Baltimore outlet had been secured until yesterday.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
Some Baltimore approaches to universal urban problems have become models for other cities, according to a pair of public service programs airing tonight on WNUV (Channel 54)."54 Checkpoint," the independent station's quarterly series to be broadcast at 10 p.m., examines the local side of the national crisis of neglected, abused and criminally involved children and teens.Host Karen Frances presents programs such as the ACT (Adolescents Coping Together) class at John Eager Howard Elementary School; Parents Anonymous; the Hollywood Diner program for young offenders; the Campaign for Our Children, which preaches against teen pregnancy; and a local, anti-gun violence rap video, "Crossfire."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | August 14, 2012
DISH subscribers could lose access to WBFF and WNUV (Channels 45 and 54) at midnight Wednesday in a disagreement over retransmission fees. "Based on current state of negotiations, there's a risk DISH won't be carrying us after midnight Wednesday," Barry Faber, executive vice president for Sinclair Broadcast Group,  said this morning. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by Sinclair, which is based in Hunt Valley. "We're hopeful, we'll get a deal, but we're also realistic," he added, saying that Sinclair wants to keep viewers informed.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 2006
The CW network, which is being launched this fall, will be broadcast in Baltimore on WNUV (Channel 54). The fledgling network is being formed by the merger of two underachieving broadcast operations, UPN and WB, and will target viewers 18 to 34 years old. Its fall lineup, which will be announced this month, is expected to include the WB's Gilmore Girls and UPN's America's Next Top Model. Managed by the Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group, WNUV is the Baltimore affiliate for the WB network, and although the CW startup was announced in January, no Baltimore outlet had been secured until yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Sinclair Broadcast Group, the Hunt Valley broadcaster that is one of the nation's largest independent owners of television stations, has settled a long-running dispute with Comcast Corp. that will allow viewers of Sinclair stations to watch programs in high-definition. The disagreement reached a critical point in January when Comcast subscribers in Baltimore and in Baltimore County complained that they wouldn't be able to watch the Super Bowl in high-definition because Sinclair wouldn't allow the cable company to carry the digital signal for its Fox affiliate.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 28, 1999
WJZ (Channel 13) continued its dominance in local news during the May "sweeps" ratings period that ended yesterday. But the hottest single newscast in town has to be the 6: 30 p.m. report on WNUV (Channel 54) that more than doubled its audience in the last year, thanks in part to its lead-in of the red-hot "Judge Judy" courtroom show.Meanwhile, one of the programs showing the biggest loss of audience from last year is "Jerry Springer," which dropped 30 percent in viewership. "Oprah," too, slipped in the ratings losing 20 percent of its audience.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1999
In an industry dominated by people with white skin, Edwin L. Edwards Sr. is an anomaly. The 47-year-old Pittsburgh businessman heads a company that owns seven television stations nationwide, including Baltimore's WNUV-TV.This has made Edwards one of the few blacks who has broken into broadcasting's ownership ranks. It has also made him a lightning rod.Edwards has been the subject of regulatory scrutiny and intense public criticism, much of which has come from the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson's Rainbow/PUSH Coalition and other pro-diversity groups that would normally be expected to applaud blacks who have reached the executive suite.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1998
When WNUV, Channel 54, switches its network affiliation tomorrow, it won't just force people to look elsewhere for their weekly dose of Captain Janeway and the crew of Voyager.The switch, along with a handful of others in markets scattered throughout the country, could prove a turning point in the struggle between two relative newcomers to the network wars.Tomorrow, WNUV, Channel 54, switches its network affiliation from UPN (United Paramount Network) to the WB (Warner Brothers). Which means, instead of the shows "Star Trek: Voyager," "Moesha" and "Clueless," the station will be airing the exploits of a gal who kills vampires ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer")
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Maryland's intermediate appellate court yesterday refused to block the switch of Channel 54 from affiliation with the United Paramount Network to Warner Brothers.The Court of Special Appeals ruling, anticipated by UPN, may not be appealed. UPN had already found a new local universe for its starship, "Star Trek: Voyager," on Channel 24.The decision also clears the way for the entry Friday of the WB Network, home of "Buffy, the Vampire Slayer," into the Baltimore market."We were confident that we would win," said Michael J. Collins, one of several attorneys for the Sinclair Broadcast Group, which operates WNUV.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1997
Come January, Baltimore's Trekkers better hope they can pick up Washington stations. The UPN network, home of "Star Trek: Voyager," is being kicked out of town.Officers of the Sinclair Broadcasting Group, which operates WNUV, Channel 54, announced yesterday they have signed a 10-year agreement with the WB network to carry its programming beginning on five of its stations in January 1998. WNUV has been carrying UPN programming since the network was launched in January 1995."WB has an awful lot of great things going for it," said Patrick Talamantes, Sinclair's director of corporate finance.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
You say you like WBFF, Channel 45's 10 p.m. newscasts, but wish you could watch them over dinner?As long as you don't mind changing the channel, that shouldn't be a problem.Beginning April 7, the same news folks you've grown to love and respect on Channel 45 will be putting together a 6: 30 p.m. newscast on WNUV, Channel 54.Both stations are managed by Sinclair Communications Inc. (which owns WBFF; Glencairn Broadcasting owns WNUV), thus making this unusual arrangement possible. And you thought their only connection was that 45 was simply 54 with the digits reversed!
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1997
Come January, Baltimore's Trekkers better hope they can pick up Washington stations. The UPN network, home of "Star Trek: Voyager," is being kicked out of town.Officers of the Sinclair Broadcasting Group, which operates WNUV, Channel 54, announced yesterday they have signed a 10-year agreement with the WB network to carry its programming beginning on five of its stations in January 1998. WNUV has been carrying UPN programming since the network was launched in January 1995."WB has an awful lot of great things going for it," said Patrick Talamantes, Sinclair's director of corporate finance.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
You say you like WBFF, Channel 45's 10 p.m. newscasts, but wish you could watch them over dinner?As long as you don't mind changing the channel, that shouldn't be a problem.Beginning April 7, the same news folks you've grown to love and respect on Channel 45 will be putting together a 6: 30 p.m. newscast on WNUV, Channel 54.Both stations are managed by Sinclair Communications Inc. (which owns WBFF; Glencairn Broadcasting owns WNUV), thus making this unusual arrangement possible. And you thought their only connection was that 45 was simply 54 with the digits reversed!
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