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FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | December 5, 2006
Only two weeks after unleashing a racially offensive tirade at a West Hollywood comedy club, actor Michael Richards appeared in blackface at a celebrity roast for Whoopi Goldberg over the weekend, drawing gasps from the audience, according to WJZ-TV, Channel 13, the CBS affiliate in Baltimore. Except that he didn't. WJZ's story, broadcast at least twice yesterday afternoon in breaking-news style by anchor Sally Thorner, was attributed to DatelineHollywood.com. But WJZ's news department was apparently unaware that every story on the Web site satirizes Hollywood.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik | October 25, 1990
WJZ-TV's "Get To Know . . ." series returns tonight with a fine example of public affairs television that is both entertaining and informative.Channel 13's Denise Koch interviews dance teacher Sylvester Campbell, Realtor Mary Bell Grempler and attorney Billy Murphy in a half-hour show that starts at 11:30 p.m. and ends all too quickly.Koch is a skilled interviewer, and has many good moments, as when asking Campbell about his dreams as a young man, Murphy about racism and Grempler about the dues she paid to earn her success in the real estate business.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 7, 1993
WMAR (Channel 2) and its NBC programs were back on cable TV in Cambridge yesterday afternoon.But there was no "Home Improvement" last night as WJZ (Channel 13) and its ABC lineup remained off Marcus Cable following an Oct. 6 deadline for cable systems to get permission from local stations to carry their programs."We're still talking," Marcellus Alexander, general manager of WJZ, said yesterday. "But we're still not on in Cambridge, and I don't know when we will be. We think the offer we initially made was fair."
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 19, 1994
In the first fallout from the shake-up in Baltimore's television market, WBAL said yesterday that it is dropping five shows in the CBS fall lineup in order to cash in on syndicated shows and reruns that are more lucrative.WBAL made the decision because it will be leaving CBS in January, when all of the city's major stations are switching networks, and it can make more money off advertising for the syndicated shows than it can with the network shows.Stations rarely pre-empt network shows during the peak viewing hours of 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., but WBAL's decision is indicative of the turmoil that has reigned in the city's TV market since the first network swap earlier this summer.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 15, 1991
President Bush may not concede there is an economic recession, but WJZ-Channel 13 is offering this weekend an unusual on-the-air campaign "to help Maryland families survive recession," in cooperation with local radio station WWIN-AM/FM (1400/95.9).Anchor Al Sanders is hosting "Hope In Hard Times," an hour-long special spawned by layoffs and budget cutbacks. It airs at 8 p.m. tomorrow and will be simulcast on the radio stations. (A repeat airing is also scheduled on Channel 13 at 10 a.m. Monday.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1998
Baltimore was just supposed to be a brief stop on the way to big-time TV success.Some brief stop. Two decades later, Marty Bass is still plugging away on WJZ, Channel 13, doing the weather, playing Costello to Don Scott's Abbott, firming up his reputation as one of the most irrepressible (some might prefer incorrigible) talents on Baltimore's airwaves.A native of Kentucky, Bass has spent the past 16 years as co-host of WJZ's morning show, a ratings champion that outdraws the competition by a greater margin than any other local weekday news show.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2001
Charles Clayton Ports, a retired broadcast engineer and avid fly fisherman who had a second career selling displays of flies that he tied, died of a heart attack June 1 while fishing the Beaverkill River in the Catskill Mountains of New York state. The longtime Owings Mills resident was 76. Born in Hampden, Mr. Ports graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1943, then served three years in the Navy as an aviation electronic technician's mate first class. After returning home, he attended a technical school in Washington and became a broadcast engineer for WJZ-TV, whose call letters then were WAAM.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | February 14, 2001
After more than four years in Baltimore, WJZ reporter Kathy Fowler was fired by the station earlier this month, to the surprise and dismay of colleagues. Fowler was one of the few journalists at the station who reveled in shaking loose new elements of stories that sparked strong public interest. "I just was astounded that they would let her go," said Mindy Basara, a reporter at rival WBAL. "She's a great reporter, aggressive, with a hard-news take on stories. I was never happy to see her on a story I was covering, because that meant the competition was there."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
WJZ-TVreports that 1.112 million area viewers watched the Ravens-Patriots game on Channel 13 Sunday, setting what is believed to be a record for the station, according to general manager Jay Newman. The game was seen by 78,000 more local viewers than watched the Ravens-Giants Super Bowl in 2001, according to Nielsen data from WJZ. The audience in the Baltimore TV market was 1.269 million for the final minutes of the game when a missed 32-yard field goal left the Ravens a 23-20 loser instead of sending the game into overtime.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 25, 1995
WJZ anchorman Al Sanders has cancer, station management said yesterday."Al Sanders has been diagnosed with cancer and is resting comfortably. We ask that the privacy of the family be respected at this time," WJZ Vice President and General Manager Marcellus Alexander said in a prepared statement. "That's really all the information that I have," Alexander added, declining to discuss Sanders' illness, hospitalization or how the newscaster's absence will affect the on-air lineup at WJZ.Sanders, who turned 54 this month, looked exceptionally tired on-air in recent weeks -- to the point that The Sun received several calls from viewers inquiring about his health.
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