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FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | December 1, 2006
The Baltimore Ravens' powerhouse season has sent fans flocking to WJZ's game telecasts, which last month showed a viewership increase of 59 percent over November 2005. That translates to an audience increase of 10.4 rating points, or 105,000 more households than were watching the games a year ago. The Ravens' average viewership this season to date is 255,000 households, for a 25.1 rating. Sunday's game against the Pittsburgh Steelers drew a 30.
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FEATURES
December 22, 1993
WJZ (Channel 13) will add captioning to its evening newscasts starting tonight in an effort to make the shows more accessible to the 323,000 members of Maryland's deaf and hard of hearing community, General Manager Marcellus Alexander says.Today and tomorrow's 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. broadcasts will be open captioned. Friday, the station will begin real-time closed captioning, which requires a special TV set or decoding device to be received."Everyone watching a WJZ newscast today and tomorrow will see the captioned words at the bottom of their TV screen and get an idea of what real-time closed captioning entails for the deaf and hard of hearing community," Alexander says.
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen and Howard Henry Chen,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1994
Peer pressure and gun violence will be among the topics discussed on "Brother-to-Brother: A Town Meeting," to air on WJZ-TV tomorrow at 7 p.m.The panel discussion will be moderated by WJZ news anchors Al Sanders and Denise Koch, with guest panelists Nathan McCall, journalist and author of "Makes Me Wanna Holler: A Young Black Man in America"; Damion Quaye, a senior at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute Senior High School; Dr. Rosetta Stith, principal of...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
In the new world of endless channels and multiple ways to watch TV, you almost never see as dramatic a change in viewing as the one unfolding in Baltimore this fall. After a year of speculation about how the end of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" would affect the fortunes of local stations, the October "sweeps" ratings period shows WJZ surpassing longtime ratings champ WBAL in the afternoon and early evening. Call it the aftereffect of the legendary Oprah Factor. Even if she hasn't yet found a way to translate her ratings magic to her new cable channel OWN, Winfrey still has an impact on local TV. Last October, WBAL, Baltimore's Hearst-owned NBC affiliate, was drawing 74,700 total viewers from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | October 25, 1990
WJZ-TV's "Get To Know . . ." series returns tonight with a fine example of public affairs television that is both entertaining and informative.Channel 13's Denise Koch interviews dance teacher Sylvester Campbell, Realtor Mary Bell Grempler and attorney Billy Murphy in a half-hour show that starts at 11:30 p.m. and ends all too quickly.Koch is a skilled interviewer, and has many good moments, as when asking Campbell about his dreams as a young man, Murphy about racism and Grempler about the dues she paid to earn her success in the real estate business.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | October 7, 1993
WMAR (Channel 2) and its NBC programs were back on cable TV in Cambridge yesterday afternoon.But there was no "Home Improvement" last night as WJZ (Channel 13) and its ABC lineup remained off Marcus Cable following an Oct. 6 deadline for cable systems to get permission from local stations to carry their programs."We're still talking," Marcellus Alexander, general manager of WJZ, said yesterday. "But we're still not on in Cambridge, and I don't know when we will be. We think the offer we initially made was fair."
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 19, 1994
In the first fallout from the shake-up in Baltimore's television market, WBAL said yesterday that it is dropping five shows in the CBS fall lineup in order to cash in on syndicated shows and reruns that are more lucrative.WBAL made the decision because it will be leaving CBS in January, when all of the city's major stations are switching networks, and it can make more money off advertising for the syndicated shows than it can with the network shows.Stations rarely pre-empt network shows during the peak viewing hours of 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., but WBAL's decision is indicative of the turmoil that has reigned in the city's TV market since the first network swap earlier this summer.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 15, 1991
President Bush may not concede there is an economic recession, but WJZ-Channel 13 is offering this weekend an unusual on-the-air campaign "to help Maryland families survive recession," in cooperation with local radio station WWIN-AM/FM (1400/95.9).Anchor Al Sanders is hosting "Hope In Hard Times," an hour-long special spawned by layoffs and budget cutbacks. It airs at 8 p.m. tomorrow and will be simulcast on the radio stations. (A repeat airing is also scheduled on Channel 13 at 10 a.m. Monday.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2001
Charles Clayton Ports, a retired broadcast engineer and avid fly fisherman who had a second career selling displays of flies that he tied, died of a heart attack June 1 while fishing the Beaverkill River in the Catskill Mountains of New York state. The longtime Owings Mills resident was 76. Born in Hampden, Mr. Ports graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1943, then served three years in the Navy as an aviation electronic technician's mate first class. After returning home, he attended a technical school in Washington and became a broadcast engineer for WJZ-TV, whose call letters then were WAAM.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 24, 2002
As seasons turn and stomachs churn during the May television sweeps period, hyper-friendly WJZ is preparing to claim a harder edge for its newscasts - and make changes in its news team. In promotional spots scheduled to start this weekend, the channel that has profitably traded on its anchors as personalities for decades will now advertise itself as "Baltimore's News Station." That might not seem like a seismic shift: Until recently, WJZ (Channel 13) has labeled itself "Baltimore's Favorite News Station" and "Baltimore's Favorite Station."
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