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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 28, 1999
WJZ (Channel 13) continued its dominance in local news during the May "sweeps" ratings period that ended yesterday. But the hottest single newscast in town has to be the 6: 30 p.m. report on WNUV (Channel 54) that more than doubled its audience in the last year, thanks in part to its lead-in of the red-hot "Judge Judy" courtroom show.Meanwhile, one of the programs showing the biggest loss of audience from last year is "Jerry Springer," which dropped 30 percent in viewership. "Oprah," too, slipped in the ratings losing 20 percent of its audience.
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 29, 2001
A city circuit court judge has dismissed seven of eight charges in a defamation lawsuit filed last year by March Funeral Homes West Inc., against WJZ-TV. The suit arose from a pair of stories broadcast by CBS-owned WJZ (Channel 13) in October 1999 about a grieving woman's fears that her late husband's casket had been improperly handled at the gravesite. The funeral home, at the time a significant advertiser on the station, claimed the stories by reporters Suzanne Collins and Alex Demetrick blamed March for work done by a veterans cemetery staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Kai Jackson, whose departure from WJZ after more than 20 years was first reported here last month, said Thursday that he will be joining Sinclair Broadcasting as its national correspondent based in Washington, D.C. "Yes, I'm going to Sinclair," Jackson said in a telephone interview. "I'm really excited. It's a company at the forefront of the industry, and I appreciate that they think I have something to offer. " Jackson said he will start his new job with the Hunt-Valley-based broadcaster Jan. 2. "Kai will be a special correspondent covering stories in the nation's capitol for all of the Sinclair news operations," Scott Livingston, VP for news at Sinclair, said in an email response to The Sun. "He will develop stories that focus on our commitment to advocacy journalism.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik | November 27, 2003
The November ratings period that helps to set advertising rates is all but complete. And both of the Titans of Television Hill are busy bragging. For the "sweeps" period ending tonight, WBAL-TV seems highly likely to take top ratings for its 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. newscasts, and for the 11 p.m. news programs on Monday through Friday. The NBC affiliate also has the highest-rated weekend morning shows as of the figures available early yesterday morning. Yet it is possible that WJZ, a CBS station with the No. 1 prime-time lineup in the market, will snare highest ratings for the 11 p.m. newscasts when the full week is considered.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 25, 2008
After 33 years of Baltimore television, Richard Sher says he's finally ready to move on. And this time, he means it. "I had done this a few times before," says Sher, whose announced retirement in 2004 lasted less than a month before he asked station management to take him back. "It was tough each time, but I thought this was the time to really do it." Sher, 67, says he made his decision to retire early this month. Although lean economic times have forced newsrooms throughout the country to cut costs, he insists the decision to leave now was his alone, and that he was not forced out by WJZ management.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
John Lanahan Jr. was spending Sunday afternoon at St. Agnes Hospital with his father, who was recovering from an allergic reaction. The two Orioles fans planned to watch the game against perennial favorite Boston Red Sox. Then disaster struck. As the game went into extra innings - ultimately, 17 in all - WJZ interrupted the broadcast at 7 p.m. to show "60 Minutes. " The hospital did not offer the cable station MASN, which carried the remainder of the game. The father and son missed out on the culmination of what is arguably the most memorable game of the O's season so far - in which designated hitter Chris Davis pitched two scoreless innings and the Orioles won, 9-6. "We were both pretty disappointed that we couldn't watch the end of the game," the 36-year-old accountant said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
WJZ-TV, which angered many fans in May when it cut away from a dramatic 17th inning win by the Baltimore Orioles to go to "60 Minutes," found itself in the same kind of programming crunch Monday. The CBS-owned station cut away from the men's finals of the U.S Open tennis championship at 6:30 Monday night to go to its Baltimore Ravens pre-game show. The station started running a crawl about 6:10 p.m. telling viewers they could follow the men's finals by going online to the station's website, wjz.com.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1998
Baltimore was just supposed to be a brief stop on the way to big-time TV success.Some brief stop. Two decades later, Marty Bass is still plugging away on WJZ, Channel 13, doing the weather, playing Costello to Don Scott's Abbott, firming up his reputation as one of the most irrepressible (some might prefer incorrigible) talents on Baltimore's airwaves.A native of Kentucky, Bass has spent the past 16 years as co-host of WJZ's morning show, a ratings champion that outdraws the competition by a greater margin than any other local weekday news show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Oprah Winfrey is one great storyteller. So let her set the stage for the story of her years in Baltimore - seven and a half years starting in 1976 that would profoundly shape not only the life of the young anchorwoman, but also give birth to the media phenomenon known as Oprah. "I came to Baltimore when I was 22 years old. Drove my red Cutlass up from Nashville, Tenn., arrived and was as close to 'The Beverly Hillbillies' as I could be," Winfrey says in that rich, inviting voice that millions have tuned in to for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Weijia Jiang, who came to WJZ-TV in June of 2008 as a reporter, is leaving to join WCBS-TV in New York City. Both stations are owned by CBS. New York is the top market in the country. Jiang came to WJZ from WOBC-TV in Salisbury. She has a bachelor's degree from the College of William & Mary and a master's in broadcast news from the University of Syracuse. Born in China, Jiang grew up in West Virginia where her parents immigrated when she was 2. Jiang, whose last day at WJZ is May 31, will be replaced by Rochelle Ritchie, a multimedia reporter from WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida.
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