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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik | November 27, 2003
The November ratings period that helps to set advertising rates is all but complete. And both of the Titans of Television Hill are busy bragging. For the "sweeps" period ending tonight, WBAL-TV seems highly likely to take top ratings for its 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. newscasts, and for the 11 p.m. news programs on Monday through Friday. The NBC affiliate also has the highest-rated weekend morning shows as of the figures available early yesterday morning. Yet it is possible that WJZ, a CBS station with the No. 1 prime-time lineup in the market, will snare highest ratings for the 11 p.m. newscasts when the full week is considered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Weijia Jiang, who came to WJZ-TV in June of 2008 as a reporter, is leaving to join WCBS-TV in New York City. Both stations are owned by CBS. New York is the top market in the country. Jiang came to WJZ from WOBC-TV in Salisbury. She has a bachelor's degree from the College of William & Mary and a master's in broadcast news from the University of Syracuse. Born in China, Jiang grew up in West Virginia where her parents immigrated when she was 2. Jiang, whose last day at WJZ is May 31, will be replaced by Rochelle Ritchie, a multimedia reporter from WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 25, 2008
After 33 years of Baltimore television, Richard Sher says he's finally ready to move on. And this time, he means it. "I had done this a few times before," says Sher, whose announced retirement in 2004 lasted less than a month before he asked station management to take him back. "It was tough each time, but I thought this was the time to really do it." Sher, 67, says he made his decision to retire early this month. Although lean economic times have forced newsrooms throughout the country to cut costs, he insists the decision to leave now was his alone, and that he was not forced out by WJZ management.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
John Lanahan Jr. was spending Sunday afternoon at St. Agnes Hospital with his father, who was recovering from an allergic reaction. The two Orioles fans planned to watch the game against perennial favorite Boston Red Sox. Then disaster struck. As the game went into extra innings - ultimately, 17 in all - WJZ interrupted the broadcast at 7 p.m. to show "60 Minutes. " The hospital did not offer the cable station MASN, which carried the remainder of the game. The father and son missed out on the culmination of what is arguably the most memorable game of the O's season so far - in which designated hitter Chris Davis pitched two scoreless innings and the Orioles won, 9-6. "We were both pretty disappointed that we couldn't watch the end of the game," the 36-year-old accountant said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
WJZ-TV, which angered many fans in May when it cut away from a dramatic 17th inning win by the Baltimore Orioles to go to "60 Minutes," found itself in the same kind of programming crunch Monday. The CBS-owned station cut away from the men's finals of the U.S Open tennis championship at 6:30 Monday night to go to its Baltimore Ravens pre-game show. The station started running a crawl about 6:10 p.m. telling viewers they could follow the men's finals by going online to the station's website, wjz.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
An audience of 849,000 area viewers tuned into WJZ-TV Sunday to see the Baltimore Ravens beat the Houston Texans in the divisional playoff game, station managment said Monday. That is 3,000 viewers more than the audience that saw the the Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers in a regular season game on Nov. 6 in prime time on WBAL, Baltimore's NBC affiliate. But that game, which the Ravens won 23-20, was in Pittsbugh. And that means most of the 70,000 people who were at M&T Stadium Sunday were at home in front of TV's in the Baltimore area for the Steelers game.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
The Baltimore Sun and WJZ-TV, Channel 13, will share content and promote each other, representatives from two of Baltimore's leading media companies announced yesterday. Under the agreement, details of which were made available to employees at both WJZ and The Baltimore Sun yesterday afternoon, video shot for the TV station will be made available on the paper's Web site, baltimoresun.com. In addition, the TV and print newsrooms will share information and work together on future projects.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | November 30, 2007
Baltimore's long-running tug-of-war continues, as WBAL, Channel 11, and WJZ, Channel 13, once again staked competing claims for TV dominance in November. For the November sweeps period, which ended Wednesday, WJZ emerged as the region's top-rated TV station for total viewers, thanks in no small part to the large number of football fans who continue watching the Ravens, in spite of the team's five-game losing streak. Measured from 6 a.m.-2 a.m., the average rankings for each quarter-hour were: 1. WJZ: 5.7 rating, 13.3 share 2. WBAL: 4.7 rating, 10.9 share 3. WMAR, Channel 2: 2.5 rating, 5.9 share 4. WBFF, Channel 45: 2.3 rating, 5.4 share.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | August 3, 2007
For WJZ, Baltimore's CBS affiliate, the July "sweeps" were cause for celebration yesterday, the station said. New ratings numbers showed that its 4 p.m. newscast had beaten powerhouse The Oprah Winfrey Show, aired by its chief competitor, WBAL, for the first time since February 2003. WJZ, Channel 13, said the viewership of the newscast had grown last month by 14 percent over July a year ago, for a total of 55,000 households, 2,000 more than were watching Oprah on WBAL, Channel 11. WJZ said Oprah lost 27 percent of its ratings from the corresponding period last year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 26, 2008
The Hollywood writers' strike safely behind them, Baltimore's TV watchers are flocking back to the network affiliates, with viewing levels up 2.3 percent over last year, according to figures released this week by A.C. Nielsen, a national ratings firm. The increase marked the first time since May of last year that overall ratings had gone up during the "sweeps" months of February, May and November, when stations traditionally put on their best programming and set advertising rates. In February, for instance, the overall audience was down 3 percent from a year ago. In November, the audience was down 5 percent.
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