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Wizard Of Oz

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NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 1999
JOIN DOROTHY and her little dog, Toto, on their adventures down the Yellow Brick Road as the Chesapeake High School Theatre Group and Choral Music Department present the musical "The Wizard of Oz" at 7: 30 p.m. tonight, tomorrow and March 26 and 27 in the school auditorium.Matinees will be given at 1 p.m. tomorrow and March 27.General admission is $7. Children younger than 12 and senior citizens pay $5.This production of the L. Frank Baum tale involves one of the largest casts the drama group has ever put on the boards, said Linda Hall, group spokeswoman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2014
Dorothy is clicking her heels into town. Andrew Lloyd Webber's stage adaptation of the film "The Wizard of Oz" comes to the Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric today through June 1, and Julia McLellan will be front and center as the girl who realizes there's no place like home. The Toronto resident received the role after auditioning while a senior studying music theater at Sheridan College in Wyoming. "I auditioned for the director and thought it was just a pipe dream," said McLellan, 23. "I was so surprised to hear that I would actually be doing the show.
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NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 1996
MOUNT AIRY Middle School's Drama Club will present the musical "The Wizard of Oz" tonight and tomorrow evening in the school's gymnasium.The classic fantasy, performed with upbeat '90s music, will feature a cast of more than 60 students, a professional sound system, costumes and elaborate scenery and stage props.Under the direction of teacher Bill Price, the students have been in production since September.Mr. Price cast different actors for the two shows, giving club members more opportunity to perform before an audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
One of Santa's helpers, a man who tilts at windmills, and Toto, too, will be part of the 2013-2014 season of the Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric. One of the country's most distinguished dance companies, the Joffrey Ballet, is also scheduled. Based on the hit film of the same name, "Elf" is a musical with a score by Matthew Sklar and Chad Beguelin, a book by Thomas Meehan (his credits include "Hairspray") and Bob Martin. The family show, which has been a presence at holiday time on Broadway, will play the Lyric Nov. 22 to Nov. 24. The plot follows the adventures of an orphan who winds up working with the other elves at the North Pole, figures out he's human, and heads to New York to find his father and, of course, what is invariably called the true spirit of Christmas.
NEWS
By Liz Lean and Liz Lean,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1996
EVERYBODY'S favorite twister will touch down on the stage of Clemens Crossing Elementary School next week when nearly 100 students present the musical "The Wizard of Oz."The children have been practicing twice a week since January and are managing the sound, lighting, scenery and props, as well as singing, dancing and acting. Assistant Principal Tony Yount directs.Performances are at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tuesday and June 12.Some of the major roles include Dorothy, Erin Ferguson; Scarecrow, Jennifer Weinreich; Tin Man, Daniel Bergin; Cowardly Lion, Rebecca Sachs; Wicked Witch of the West, Laura Tyler; Glinda, the Good Witch, Tierra Brown; Wizard of Oz, Evan Cooper; Toto, Erica Finkel; guard, Patrick Nairn; mayor of Munchkinland, Mark Seifter; and lead Munchkins Jackie DesRoches and Maria Martirano.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 1998
CHILDREN CAN get into the act during the children's theater performance of "The Wizard of Oz" this weekend at North Carroll High School.Performances are at 7 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. and 7 p.m Saturday. Tickets cost $3 for adults and $2 for children under 12."This is an audience-participation version," said Roberta Gore, a drama instructor at the school. "It doesn't have a cast of thousands, so there are lots of opportunities for children. They're asked to be Toto watchers by holding the leash of the dog. The kids stand up to be the trees.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 10, 1990
"The Dreamer of Oz: The L. Frank Baum Story" is an old-fashioned, frothy concoction of Horatio Alger dreams, Hollywood values, Day-glo sets, soft focus, childlike innocence and calculated filmmaking.The made-for-TV biography of the author of "The Wizard of Oz" gets a little tedious in its constant exhortations about "dreaming dreams," "believing in dreams" and "following dreams." In fact, the film, which airs at 9 tonight on WMAR-TV (Channel 2), has a lot more to say about dreams and imagination than it does about Baum's real life.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
River Hill High School may need to widen the Yellow Brick Road when it presents The Wizard of Oz this week with a cast of more than 80 young actors. Director Pam Land said her drama department is excited to reach out to the community by using 36 elementary and middle school pupils alongside 52 River Hill students. The children will play munchkins who direct Kansas girl Dorothy to seek out the Wizard of Oz after a cyclone carries her, her house and her dog, Toto, to that magical land over the rainbow.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 1996
And how goes the Annapolis Summer Garden's production of "The Wizard of Oz," which will be playing at the hospitable outdoor theater across from the City Dock Thursday through Sunday evenings until Aug. 31?Well, it doesn't have Toto, flying monkeys or sleep-inducing poppies, which I can live without. And it has a vapid, ineffectual tornado sequence, which I could make do with.But it is utterly devoid of the sense of magical fun that should pervade every second of the Frank L. Baum classic.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 8, 1998
Test screenings. A huge marketing campaign with endless commercial tie-ins. A major release onto 1,000-plus screens nationwide.All this for a 60-year-old film that is already one of the best-known, best-loved and most-seen of all time: "The Wizard of Oz."It's the latest and most spectacular example of Hollywood studios rummaging through their vaults and re-releasing classics - or what they think might be classics. Along with 1939's "Oz," 1983's "The Big Chill," the comedy-drama about a reunion of '60s radicals turned yuppies, returned to theaters this past weekend.
FEATURES
By Sarai Brinker | March 21, 2013
Lions and tigers and Oz movies, oh my! With the recent release of Disney's “Oz the Great and Powerful” and the expected release this year from Summertime Entertainment of the animated “Dorothy of Oz,” we think it's the perfect time to plan a birthday party down the yellow brick road. Click your heels three times, and follow us to Oz for step-by-step instructions on how to throw a DIY birthday party that will have your child and his or her guests over-the-rainbow. The Big Surprise Some of the best advice we can pass on for party planning is this: Always plan an element of surprise that no one will be able to stop talking about.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Every fan of the 1939 classic film "The Wizard of Oz" should plan to travel to Columbia during the next two months to visit the magical land of Oz at Toby's Dinner Theatre. Toby's production brings the beloved screen characters — Dorothy and friends Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion — live and up close to us so we feel we are traveling with them along the Yellow Brick Road. Director David James moves this film classic to 2012 with increased magic created by his fabulous cast and by using special effects including swirling tornadoes, fearsome thunderclaps and lightning flashes along with billowing smoke.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Everyone who has ever sat before a television or movie screen to enjoy the fantasy of "The Wizard of Oz" should plan to see how magical this family favorite becomes onstage at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. The production brings the beloved characters live and up-close, so that we feel we are traveling the Yellow Brick Road with Dorothy and her newfound friends, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion. Director David James transfers this 1939 film classic — which was based on the book by L. Frank Baum — to 2012, and dazzles us with a fabulous cast and exciting special effects that include swirling tornadoes that whisk us away from Kansas.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | April 18, 2012
Watching the classic movie "The Wizard of Oz" always makes you feel like you're not in Kansas anymore. The theatrical version of this immortal musical at Toby's Dinner Theatre does a pretty good job of making you feel like you're not in Columbia anymore. This is a challenging musical to adapt for the stage. Let's start with the special effects. There is the twister that spins Dorothy's Kansas farmhouse around and then deposits it in Oz. There is the water-soaked witch who must shrink until she disappears.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2011
The exterior of the Anne Arundel County home of Mark Rucci and his partner, Randall Franklin, provides few clues to the storybook world visitors will find inside. At street level, a Victorian wrought-iron gate stands between two large urns containing trimmed topiary. While the gate opens to the front walk, its placement and its arched carving are purely an ornamental touch — there is no fencing to keep people from the yard. At the end of the walk, four artificial pink trees sit on pedestals in front of the bi-level home with its light yellow siding and vivid, cadet blue shutters on each window.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
Pat-pat here, pat-pat there, And a couple of brand-new straws; That's how we keep you young and fair In the Merry Old Land of Oz! - E.Y. Harburg, lyricist The notice for tryouts was like nothing Vicki Smith had seen, and she has been in the theater a long time. Bring 12 performers, it said. Be sure they can sing and dance, that they show enthusiasm and that they're willing to commit a lot of time. Oh, and be sure none is taller than 5 feet or weighs more than 100 pounds - otherwise, they'd never fit into their Munchkin togs.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 3, 1996
If the hustle of the holidays is getting you down, take a break this weekend and visit the magical Land of Oz. All you have to do is travel to Eldersburg, where Liberty High School is staging "The Wizard of Oz.""The story is the same as in the movie, except the play is pure fantasy -- there's no moral ending or message," said Bill Lizor, a Liberty junior who is making his directorial debut."You can sit back and have fun for two hours. That's what we'd like you to do."In Liberty's production, Dorothy is still an innocent dreamer, the Scarecrow can't think, the Tin Man has no heart and the Cowardly Lion is still cowardly.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 14, 1997
Ever wonder what Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" would have looked like as a music video?If you're a dedicated Pink Floyd fan, you already know -- it looks like "The Wizard of Oz." Exactly like "Oz," in fact. According to the cognoscenti, if you cue up both the album and the film, "Dark Side of the Moon" turns out to be the perfect soundtrack for "The Wizard of Oz."In fact, so many things sync up that it's hard to believe it's a coincidence.For instance, in the song "Breathe," the lyric "balanced on the biggest wave" is heard just as Dorothy balances atop the fence to the hog pens.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
Vaudeville never died - it just went over the rainbow, where it became immortal. That's the bracing comic message of "The 70th Anniversary Edition of The Wizard of Oz." This tender yet also tingling high-definition restoration provides a Munchkin City, an Emerald City and Wicked Witch's castle that announce themselves as brilliantly colored stage sets - make that soundstage sets. Then they burst into unruly life with the singing and dancing of Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr, Jack Haley Jr., Margaret Hamilton, and, of course, the Munchkins - who on a flight of mass inspiration turn wildly different schticks into compelling characters and cohesive, overwhelming magic.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Taking a shower has never felt truly safe ever since Janet Leigh stepped under the spray in the bathroom of nondescript Cabin 1 at the Bates Motel, during the most famous scene of Alfred Hitchcock's stylish horror film from 1960, Psycho. It's chilling enough to see the mysterious assailant's knife come slashing through the air at the unfortunate woman. What really makes the scene click is the accompanying sound of Bernard Herrmann's music, with its piercing strings underlining every jab of the violence.
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