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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
An undercover federal agent in Maryland played a key role in the shutdown Wednesday of what authorities describe as a massive online drug marketplace called the Silk Road, whose owner allegedly began scheming to kill perceived rivals. Authorities say Ross William Ulbricht, a 29-year-old San Francisco engineer with a physics degree, built his site into the Amazon of illegal narcotics. He is accused of serving “several thousand drug dealers” since January 2011, with sales exceeding $1 billion and transactions occurring with a virtual currency called Bitcoin.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Awaiting trial on charges that he and his crew arranged seven shootings to avenge the death of a family member, Robert G. Moore plotted from prison to kill two Baltimore prosecutors working to keep him behind bars for life, according to court arguments and filings in the case. Moore, 45, told people he had taken steps to carry out the plan, which he hoped would scare off witnesses, according to court documents. He even knew that one of the prosecutors was pregnant and threatened to send an associate to the hospital when she gave birth, Assistant State's Attorney LaRai Everett said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The Colonial Players troupe is opening its 65th season with an invitation for audiences to embark on an adventure of new voices and broad horizons — namely a time travel adventure written by prolific British master of farce, Alan Ayckbourn. "Communicating Doors" is a daring departure from Ayckbourn's comedy, "Taking Steps," which closed Colonial Players' previous season. The show asks us to suspend disbelief — or at least stretch it to accept what may be possible through time travel.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
A Baltimore City Paper reporter testified in a federal murder-for-hire trial Thursday, drawn into the story of a man whose career as a builder and petty criminal he has covered for more than half a decade. Edward Ericson Jr., a staff writer for the alternative weekly, first wrote about defendant Jose Morales in 2006 in an article questioning his building practices. Morales was later convicted on federal drug charges. He's now on trial in the death of Robert Long, a man who had been working with authorities against Morales in a theft case.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
State and federal prosecutors have had two explanations for how Robert Long ended up dead. In the first, he was killed over a dispute with a drug dealer. In the second, he was killed because he agreed to testify against one of his co-conspirators in a scheme to steal construction equipment. The first explanation — backed up by two eyewitnesses — proved good enough for a Baltimore jury to convict Demetrius Smith of murder in 2010. But authorities now acknowledge that account was wrong, and Smith has been freed.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 18, 2013
A Tilghman Island commercial fisherman has been charged with witness tampering and intimidation in a federal investigation into alleged poaching of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay, prosecutors announced Wednesday. Michael D. Hayden, Jr., 41,was arrested Tuesday, according to a news release issued by U.S. attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. Prosecutors say agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Maryland Natural Resources Police learned while investigating alleged striped bass poaching that Hayden had allegedly tried to manipulate some witnesses' testimony to a grand jury while trying to prevent others from testifying at all.  The criminal complaint against Hayden also alleges he threatened to retaliate against a potential witness he believed to be cooperating with investigators.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
After Baltimore police officers fatally shot a man in the Douglass Homes housing project last week, the accounts of what happened were nearly as great in number as the people who said they saw it. Police said 25-year-old Donte Bennett took out a gun before officers shot him. One resident said she saw the man's hands in the air; another said he was on his back with officers holding his wrists. Bennett's mother called for an outside review of the incident, and police say they have opened an internal investigation.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
— Anne Arundel County Executive Laura A. Neuman and the head of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation sparred Tuesday over the storm water fees enacted this year on homeowners and businesses in Maryland's most populous localities. Testifying at a Senate subcommittee hearing presided over by Sen. Ben Cardin, Neuman reiterated her opposition to the state-mandated fee, which she and other critics deride as a "rain tax. " The storm water fee requirement imposed by state lawmakers on Baltimore and the state's nine largest counties generated substantial debate this spring, as all faced a July 1 deadline for imposing some kind of charge on property owners to cover costs of reducing polluted runoff.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
Friends of the woman at the center of a sexual assault investigation involving three members of the Naval Academy football team testified Monday that she appeared intoxicated on the night of the alleged attacks. But none of the witnesses at a preliminary hearing Monday said the female midshipman was so drunk at an off-campus party that it became necessary to intervene, to stop her from drinking or to take her home. The woman has said she remembers little of the April 2012 night during which the three fellow midshipmen are alleged to have engaged in sexual acts with her while she was incapacitated.
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