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By RICHARD BOUDREAUX and RICHARD BOUDREAUX,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Saddam Hussein took the witness stand at his trial for the first time yesterday and openly incited insurgents to continue resisting the U.S. military presence in Iraq, prompting the chief judge to close the session to journalists and the public. Rather than answer capital charges that he orchestrated the torture and killing of Shiite Muslims in the 1980s, the deposed president delivered a rambling 49-minute harangue, his longest and most inflammatory of the five-month-old trial.
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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
The embattled former campaign manager for Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. took the witness stand in his own defense Friday, denying that he planned a last-minute Election Day effort last year to suppress the black vote in Baltimore and Prince George's County in a desperate push for Ehrlich to regain the governorship. Paul Schurick, 55, testified that Ehrlich needed more — not fewer — crossover African-American voters to boost his 2010 candidacy. He said that during a July meeting, he rejected political consultant Julius Henson's strategy — laid out in what Henson called the "Schurick Doctrine" — to keep those votes down.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
A young father took the witness stand yesterday to defend himself against accusations that he beat his toddler son to death in a walloping so harsh that the child's liver was nearly split in half. But under intense cross-examination, Rodney Lamar Dickerson, 22, of Laurel, a former Navy cryptology technician, admitted lying to Anne Arundel County police investigating the death of 3-year-old Rodney Jr. and to punishing the boy he felt had been coddled in his teen-age mother's home. In testimony this week in the child-abuse murder trial, Dickerson and his former live-in girlfriend - the mother of his second child but not of Rodney Jr. - blamed each other for Rodney Jr.'s death, each saying the other had reasons and opportunity to harm the child Aug. 13. The death of Rodney Jr., who court testimony said missed his mother and barely knew the father who brought him to Maryland, has drawn criminal defense lawyers and prosecutors to the trial.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Taking the stand to challenge a first-degree murder charge against him, a 31-year-old used-car salesman suggested to a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury Thursday that detectives had tried to strengthen their case by erasing part of a taped interview with the defendant before his arrest in March 2010. "There's a lot of stuff missing" from the tape played in court, said the defendant, Frederick A. Christian, the only witness for the defense before both sides in his trial rested their cases.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 24, 1993
NEW YORK -- Woody Allen was the only one to take th witness stand yesterday. But it was the voice of a child that seemed to resonate loudest in the packed courtroom.A letter that Moses Farrow Allen, 14, wrote to his adoptive father was read by Mia Farrow's attorney, revealing a child's-eye view of the heartbreak that this nasty custody battle has apparently wrought."You've done a horrible, unforgivable, needy, ugly, stupid thing," Moses wrote to Mr. Allen, 57, after his affair with Ms. Farrow's adopted daughter, Soon-Yi Farrow Previn, 22, became public last year.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2003
Former Carroll County schools Superintendent William H. Hyde took the witness stand yesterday in a pretrial hearing on charges that he raped and molested an elementary school-age girl, describing a verbal and emotional "beating" he said he took before saying in an apology letter that he had inappropriately touched the girl. "My sense was they were dictating what needed to be said," Hyde, 61, testified, referring to the girl's mother and to the investigators who interrogated him in the hours before he was arrested in August at the Maryland State Police barracks in Westminster.
NEWS
October 13, 2002
ANNAPOLIS - Testimony that will determine how much a Pasadena woman has to pay her former boss, one of the biggest landlords in Annapolis, will resume Dec. 17 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, when the defendant takes the witness stand for a third time. Bookkeeper Heather Myers, 30, admitted stealing from Ronald B. Hollander's business, but maintains that she took less than $20,000, not the $171,000 prosecutors say she took in cash and money orders. Friday, in the second day of the hearing before Judge Pamela L. North, Myers denied taking expensive trips, including trips to the Super Bowl and to football playoff games.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | October 31, 1991
Jerry Paul Cooper, a small, timid-looking man with thin, graying hair, took the witness stand yesterday for the first time since his conviction for attempted rape 33 years ago.He wore a rust-colored leisure suit. His feet were chained.When Cooper hobbled to the stand-- moving with a painfully slow shuffle with hunched shoulders and clasped hands-- everyone in the silent courtroom watched him with sympathy.When the court clerk asked him to raise his right hand for the oath, he raised his left instead.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
William "Tippa" Thomas III, He didn't know who shot him. He didn't know how many bullets were fired that day. And he didn't know why anyone would open fire on a crowd of students at his high school on a sunny Friday afternoon in the midst of graduation preparations and prom season. So for six days, William "Tippa" Thomas III, who was left partially paralyzed by the May 7 shootings at Randallstown High School, wheeled himself into courtroom No. 2 in Baltimore County Circuit Court and listened.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
A Virginia man convicted in the shooting death of his then ex-wife's boyfriend at a Jessup hotel in June 1991 asked for a new trial in Howard Circuit Court yesterday.Adel George Hagez, 46, of Richmond could be sentenced to life in prison if Judge Cornelius Sybert Jr. denies his request and upholds his conviction for first-degree murder and a weapons violation.At yesterday's hearing, Baltimore attorney William H. Murphy Jr. told Judge Sybert that he erred in ordering the defendant's wife to the witness stand even though he knew she would not testify.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
A 37-year-old man took the witness stand Thursday to deny charges that he had sexually abused his own son. The boy, now 8, testified a day earlier in Baltimore County Circuit Court that his father had sought certain acts as "punishment" when the boy misbehaved. Prosecutors say the abuse took place between August 2008 and June 2009, and led to an indictment against the suspect after the boy told his mother about the allegations. The man was charged with sexual abuse of a minor, assault and two sexual-offense counts.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella , jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
Did it happen as early as jury selection, or as late as the closing arguments? Or was it at some point in between when the trial of Mayor Sheila Dixon started heading down a path that led jurors to find her guilty Tuesday on one of five criminal counts? In a trial that took surprising turns over its 14-day course, no one incident alone propelled the action; rather it was a pileup of factors that eventually resulted in her conviction on a charge of misappropriation. Going into trial, conventional wisdom seemed to favor Dixon - her seven-member legal team would seem to outgun State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh and his three lawyers in sheer numbers alone, if not reputation.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Tommy Sanders III was born in Baltimore and grew up in Park Heights, near Virginia Avenue, "a high drug- infested area." He had friends "who sold and who indulged in drugs" and, he said, he was rousted by city cops for no reason. It is an often-told tale of inner-city life. But while some of his friends grew up and went to prison, Tommy Sanders grew up and became a Baltimore police officer. Then the biases he had against cops were turned on him. "I have had more people disgusted with police than people who liked me," Sanders said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
The only surviving eyewitness to have claimed to see Patrick Byers kill a man on a Baltimore street corner in 2006 recanted his story before a federal jury Wednesday as Byers, who is on trial in the killing of another witness, looked on. Joseph D. Parham Jr., 37, was arrested at his grandmother's home and forced to testify, after he failed to apear Tuesday. He was granted a promise of immunity if he told the truth. Parham said Wednesday that he had lied about seeing Byers to avoid punishment in a 2006 drug arrest.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
After three days of deliberations, a Baltimore jury deadlocked yesterday in the murder trial of a man prosecutors accused of doing what the criminal justice system failed to do: punish the murderer of his little brother. After retired Circuit Judge Thomas J.S. Waxter declared a mistrial, Assistant State's Attorney James Francomano said that he would retry Darnell Edmonds, 25, in the killing of Kenneth Worrell, 28, of the 800 block of Bethune Road in Cherry Hill. Worrell was found dead in that block with multiple gunshot wounds to his upper body in December 2006.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
In a move that could force prosecutors to drop hundreds of cases, Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy has asked city police to give her files on officers who are being investigated for lying or other offenses that could damage their credibility on the witness stand. In a letter to Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, Jessamy points to a case in which a detective continued to testify in criminal cases four years after the department began investigating him for deceiving emergency dispatchers in a domestic violence case.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
The long, bitter feud between one Watergate figure who went to prison protecting Richard M. Nixon and another who helped topple the president came down yesterday to this point-blank question: Does G. Gordon Liddy want John W. Dean III dead? "I wouldn't consider him worth a quarter to buy the cartridge that would propel the bullet to kill him with," Liddy said in court. "He just isn't worth it." Liddy's salty testimony came as he spent a second day on the witness stand in a $5.1 million defamation case against him in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Today, lawyers for I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby will begin their defense of the indicted former White House aide with a parade of witnesses, including prominent journalists, former co-workers and maybe even his old boss, Vice President Dick Cheney. But will Libby testify? Libby and his lawyers face a tough choice about what is normally the make-or-break decision in criminal trials. His unusual defense to perjury charges in the CIA leak case - that he misspoke because he was having to juggle so many other duties as Cheney's chief of staff - would seem to require that he personally take the witness stand to explain it. But if he does testify, Libby risks exposing himself to serious questions about his credibility and a grilling by a prosecutor with a reputation for doggedness.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Sitting in a booster seat on the witness stand, 6-year-old Dana leaned forward to answer a prosecutor's question: "Why don't you live with your mom anymore?" "Because Neef shot her," the boy said. He pointed to the defendant, in a chair just a few feet away. "He shot her and then he left." In another Baltimore courtroom days later, a prosecutor asked 10-year-old Jose, tidily dressed in a silver shirt and tie, "Do you know why you came to court today?" "I was there when my dad was killed," he answered.
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