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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
The boyfriend of a woman who was found fatally shot along with her 4-year-old daughter in a Parkville apartment has been arrested in the killings. Brian Lamont Eggleston Jr., 28, was charged Wednesday with two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Alicia Avery, 25, and her daughter, Darry'el, whose bodies were found Monday afternoon. Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson said detectives suspected by early Tuesday that the slayings were the result of a domestic dispute.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2014
The recent editorial on strengthening domestic violence restraining orders documents the effectiveness of such orders ("End the abuse," Feb. 2). Here are some ways that also could prevent/end abuse. •Strengthen the laws in states that consider tissue damage such as severe bruises misdemeanors and only issue restraining orders if there is damage to organs such as the spleen, a green light to abusers. •Create laws to stop people such as some judges from holding victims responsible as having provoked the abuse.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
A campaign commercial being aired by the challenger in the state's attorney's race is reviving a debate over one of the darkest chapters in the city's struggle with violence — the 2002 killing of seven people in an East Baltimore arson. A group of politicians and community members held a news conference Wednesday afternoon at a neighborhood church, demanding that defense attorney Gregg Bernstein immediately pull the commercial. In the ad, the former witness protection coordinator for the state's attorney's office reiterates contentions that the Dawson family perished because of mismanagement in the state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
The boyfriend of a woman who was found fatally shot along with her 4-year-old daughter in a Parkville apartment has been arrested in the killings. Brian Lamont Eggleston Jr., 28, was charged Wednesday with two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Alicia Avery, 25, and her daughter, Darry'el, whose bodies were found Monday afternoon. Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson said detectives suspected by early Tuesday that the slayings were the result of a domestic dispute.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
The recent editorial on strengthening domestic violence restraining orders documents the effectiveness of such orders ("End the abuse," Feb. 2). Here are some ways that also could prevent/end abuse. •Strengthen the laws in states that consider tissue damage such as severe bruises misdemeanors and only issue restraining orders if there is damage to organs such as the spleen, a green light to abusers. •Create laws to stop people such as some judges from holding victims responsible as having provoked the abuse.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
A new bill may make more federal money available to protect witnesses in state and local cases around the country, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said Thursday morning. He made the announcement in Baltimore, where witness intimidation has been a persistent problem. This week, a federal jury is hearing testimony about the murder of Carl Stanley Lackl, who was killed before he testified in a homicide case. Retaliation against witnesses has escalated to the point where "it basically can destroy your criminal justice system," Cummings said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
The defense attorney vying to be the city's top prosecutor released a television ad Monday in which a former state's attorney's office employee says "people are getting away with murder and it's because Patricia Jessamy fails to convict them. " The commercial also links Jessamy's office with the deaths of seven people in a 2002 firebombing. In addition, the ad features an image of an off-duty city police spokesman speaking to defense attorney Gregg Bernstein, which could raise more questions about the link between Bernstein's campaign and the police department.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 12, 2000
A family in Baltimore's witness protection program was turned out yesterday morning from the suburban motel where they had been living for three months. James and Toyquan Matthews, along with their six children, had moved out of their West Baltimore home after the family was twice threatened by friends of a man facing an attempted murder trial. The case, for which Toyquan Matthews had been called as a witness. was shelved June 27 because of insufficient evidence, but the family's troubles have continued.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
BOSTON - As trial began in November for two men accused of killing a 10-year-old girl at a park, a pair of the defendants' suspected gang members slipped into the courtroom wearing "stop snitching" T-shirts. In August, police stumbled across a street documentary as it was being filmed outside a school south of the city. The props: "stop snitching" T-shirts, grand jury transcripts listing witness' names and a loaded gun. And the lyrics on a CD made by a murder suspect and his amateur rap group, Full Blooded, condemn people who cooperate with police and prosecutors, even naming "rats" in their housing project.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | May 10, 2008
The state's second-highest court yesterday solidified judges' abilities to protect witnesses from intimidation and bar defense attorneys from sharing information about witnesses with their clients. The case arose in 2005 after Jovon Brian Lancaster's girlfriend received a counterfeit $100 bill in a drug deal. Lancaster and his brother, Pablo Guillermo Lancaster, retaliated by robbing the people who had used the counterfeit money, according to the court ruling. At the request of Montgomery County prosecutors, the trial judge placed witnesses to the crime under a protective order, which barred Jovon Lancaster's lawyer from sharing their names, criminal records, statements and grand jury testimony before trial.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
A campaign commercial being aired by the challenger in the state's attorney's race is reviving a debate over one of the darkest chapters in the city's struggle with violence — the 2002 killing of seven people in an East Baltimore arson. A group of politicians and community members held a news conference Wednesday afternoon at a neighborhood church, demanding that defense attorney Gregg Bernstein immediately pull the commercial. In the ad, the former witness protection coordinator for the state's attorney's office reiterates contentions that the Dawson family perished because of mismanagement in the state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
The defense attorney vying to be the city's top prosecutor released a television ad Monday in which a former state's attorney's office employee says "people are getting away with murder and it's because Patricia Jessamy fails to convict them. " The commercial also links Jessamy's office with the deaths of seven people in a 2002 firebombing. In addition, the ad features an image of an off-duty city police spokesman speaking to defense attorney Gregg Bernstein, which could raise more questions about the link between Bernstein's campaign and the police department.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
A new bill may make more federal money available to protect witnesses in state and local cases around the country, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said Thursday morning. He made the announcement in Baltimore, where witness intimidation has been a persistent problem. This week, a federal jury is hearing testimony about the murder of Carl Stanley Lackl, who was killed before he testified in a homicide case. Retaliation against witnesses has escalated to the point where "it basically can destroy your criminal justice system," Cummings said.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | May 10, 2008
The state's second-highest court yesterday solidified judges' abilities to protect witnesses from intimidation and bar defense attorneys from sharing information about witnesses with their clients. The case arose in 2005 after Jovon Brian Lancaster's girlfriend received a counterfeit $100 bill in a drug deal. Lancaster and his brother, Pablo Guillermo Lancaster, retaliated by robbing the people who had used the counterfeit money, according to the court ruling. At the request of Montgomery County prosecutors, the trial judge placed witnesses to the crime under a protective order, which barred Jovon Lancaster's lawyer from sharing their names, criminal records, statements and grand jury testimony before trial.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
John P. Dowery Jr. couldn't stay away from the family he loved and the East Baltimore neighborhood he called home. Angela and Carnell Dawson Jr. couldn't bear the thought of moving their five children out of their family home on Preston Street. As payback for their repeated calls to the police, local drug dealers firebombed the Dawson house in 2002, killing the entire family. Dowery, 38, was shot to death near his old home on Thanksgiving, and police and the FBI are investigating whether he was killed because he was to be a witness in a federal drug case.
FEATURES
By GEORGE RUSH AND JOANNA MOLLOY and GEORGE RUSH AND JOANNA MOLLOY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 13, 2006
You've seen the breakups and makeups of Tony and Carmela Soprano. But, when it comes to romantic fury, the TV mob couple has nothing on Joe and Nancy Defede. The Defedes are the real deal. For four years, Joe was acting boss of the Lucchese crime family -- until 1998, when he pleaded guilty to shaking down garment businesses. He and Nancy have been married for 35 years (the last three in the federal witness protection program). Living in close quarters under assumed names in a state far from Howard Beach, N.Y., has been the kiss of death for their romance.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 2, 2005
THERE GOES that darned Constitution getting in the way again. Don't you hate it when that happens? So just when we thought a bill in the state legislature that would increase the penalty for witness intimidation might pass, along come those picky defense attorneys talking about how one part of the bill might be -- I hate to used the dreaded "u" word here -- unconstitutional. At issue is the clause of the bill that would have Maryland adopt the "hearsay exception" -- which sounds like one of those lawyer terms that are meant to, and often do, confuse laymen.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
Fearful witnesses to violent crimes in Baltimore will be eligible for travel expenses to and from court, stepped-up police protection and money to relocate under a new program to be launched by the Schmoke administration next month.The $500,000 witness security program is designed to encourage witnesses who might be afraid to come forward to cooperate with police and prosecutors, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said at a news briefing yesterday."I think this is going to help us a great deal with our ability to effectively prosecute some of the violent offenders who have been preying upon our community," the mayor said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2005
Testifying at a congressional field hearing to address Baltimore's pervasive witness intimidation problem, Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that reforming the criminal justice system would be the best way to help people who cooperate with police feel safe. The mayor called recent state and federal legislative efforts "a vital component" but said that "more effective prosecution and more effective law enforcement" would be a powerful deterrent to witness intimidation. O'Malley was one of the speakers at the hearing sponsored by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat who was seeking local input on his proposals to pump federal dollars into fighting witness intimidation and encouraging local cooperation with authorities.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
BOSTON - As trial began in November for two men accused of killing a 10-year-old girl at a park, a pair of the defendants' suspected gang members slipped into the courtroom wearing "stop snitching" T-shirts. In August, police stumbled across a street documentary as it was being filmed outside a school south of the city. The props: "stop snitching" T-shirts, grand jury transcripts listing witness' names and a loaded gun. And the lyrics on a CD made by a murder suspect and his amateur rap group, Full Blooded, condemn people who cooperate with police and prosecutors, even naming "rats" in their housing project.
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