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BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | December 23, 1991
A chart on page E1 of yesterday's Evening Sun incorrectly listed the amounts of withholding taxes due the federal government from businesses nationally. The chart should have indicated that businesses owed the federal government $5 billion in 1991, $4.6 billion in 1990 and $4.7 billion in 1989. The Evening Sun regrets the error.When cash is tight and getting a bank loan impossible, some business owners can't resist the temptation to dip into the money they withhold from employee paychecks to pay taxes.
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NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
It wasn't long after Ashley Overbey won approval for a $63,000 settlement from Baltimore's government that anonymous critics began their assault against her on the Internet. Commenting on news accounts of the settlement - which ended her lawsuit alleging police brutality - they accused the 27-year-old of initiating her arrest to get a big payout. She responded, defending herself and recounting details of the incident - a move that led the city to withhold $31,500 from Overbey's payout this week.
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BUSINESS
December 19, 1997
The Maryland State Comptroller's Office has mailed more than 121,000 employers in the state a tax withholding guide for 1998 that explains the latest changes to the law.The guide provides both instructions and tables stating how much employers should withhold from weekly, biweekly and monthly pay checks.It also reminds employers that the tax deduction applies only to the state income tax.The state income tax rate drops to 4.95 percent from 5 percent next year, and the personal exemption increases to $1,400 from $1,200.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Officials at People's Community Health Centers said Friday they remains committed to opening a health center in Severn, despite Anne Arundel County holding back funding after learning of an IRS judgement against the nonprofit. Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman said Thursday the county was ending two grants promised to People's related to a planned health and community center after discovering financial problems. According to Neuman, People's owes $463,925.65 in a federal judgment.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1997
Representatives of the state comptroller's office met yesterday in Rockville with supervisors of high school guidance counselors, as part of an effort to get the word out about a new withholding exemption form.Students and other part-time workers earning less than $6,800 do not need to have taxes withheld from their paychecks, but must file a new form to be exempted from withholding.Those filing by Dec. 31 will avoid withholding in the new year and may not have to file a 1998 state return at all, said Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | August 16, 1992
CHICAGO -- Anyone with a nest egg growing securely in a company pension plan should keep an eye on the new fox patrolling the henhouse: U.S. lawmakers.Under legislation effective Jan. 1, 1993, any lump-sum distribution from a company pension plan -- generally made to someone who retires, resigns or is fired -- will be subject to a 20 percent withholding tax if the check is paid directly to the employee. The result of what critics call a trap built into the new withholding law could be more taxes owed on April 15, 1993.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1993
QUESTION: I soon will buy my first house and will have a huge deduction to take off my taxes. But I don't want to pay out so much for withholding taxes during the year and only get the money back next year when I file my taxes. What should I do?ANSWER: One of the primary financial advantages of homeownership is the tax deduction allowed to the homeowner. Typically, a homeowner can deduct from income all mortgage interest plus all real estate taxes.Therefore, the amount of interest and taxes to be paid in the coming year should be added together and divided by 12 -- this equals the monthly tax deduction the home will provide.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
MILWAUKEE -- Orioles players and owner Peter Angelos agree on at least one thing: The owners should not have withheld the $7.8 million All-Star Game payment to the players' pension fund, a move that caused the players to discuss pushing up the strike date to yesterday, before they decided to keep it at Aug. 12.They disagree on the intent of the move.Orioles player representatives Mike Mussina and Jim Poole were on a conference call with union officials and player representatives from other clubs yesterday.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | March 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's effort to stimulate the economy by cutting the amount of federal taxes withheld from paychecks each week may be both an economic and political fiasco.People across the country are rejecting Mr. Bush's decision to unilaterally lower their refund checks from the Internal Revenue Service or put them in the position where they could owe the government money.They are deluging corporate and government personnel offices to undo what the president did. And many are angry that they have to go to the trouble because of what they see as an election-year ploy.
BUSINESS
By Bill Barnhart and Bill Barnhart,Chicago Tribune | March 2, 1992
The 1992 election campaign has barely begun, but every wage and salary earner in America now has a chance to vote on part of President Bush's economic recovery package, a key campaign issue.Instead of asking for a ballot, they can ask their employer for a W-4 form and decline the lower tax withholding rate in the Bush plan. Or they can take home a bit more cash with each paycheck.New tax withholding schedules are to be implemented by employers starting today. The new schedules, which Mr. Bush called for in his State of the Union speech, are intended to cut tax withholding rates slightly and put a maximum this year of $345 -- for married people filing jointly -- into the pockets of low- and middle-income workers.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The Senate unanimously passed bills Thursday allowing Baltimore City and Washington County to adopt a program launched in Anne Arundel County under which people with open warrants can have their state income tax refunds withheld, The legislation builds on an initiative launched by Anne Arundel Sheriff Ron Bateman under which 446 letters were sent out to people who had outstanding warrants warning that the Comptroller's Office would not send them...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
An Anne Arundel County program that withholds tax refunds from people with outstanding warrants - and last year enticed hundreds of people to turn themselves in - could be expanded to Baltimore and possibly even statewide. The idea, tried by county Sheriff Ron Bateman, has produced impressive results. Last year, his office sent letters to 446 people with warrants, saying refunds wouldn't be mailed until they settled their legal issues. The result: 345 people - 77 percent of those notified - turned themselves in, including some who faced criminal charges for assault, drugs and prostitution.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Government watchdog group Common Cause Maryland and other transparency advocates say they're enthusiastic about proposed General Assembly legislation that would create a panel to oversee public information requests. Baltimore Del. Jill P. Carter's bill would create an oversight board to which citizens and the media could appeal heavily redacted or denied requests. State law outlines the information available to the public; some items such as personnel reports can be withheld. Currently, citizens must sue the government in Circuit Court to seek documents if state or local officials do not provide the requested information.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
As Maryland officials touted their implementation of the Affordable Care Act, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown was front and center - proudly describing the state as a national leader in preparing for the overhaul. But even though Brown was helping to lead the health care effort, he wrote no emails to the state workers overseeing development of the state's online health insurance marketplace - at least none that his office deemed fit for public release. The Baltimore Sun investigated the botched Oct. 1 rollout of the Maryland health insurance exchange, and reporters requested emails sent to and from Brown on the issue.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
An attorney representing the University of Maryland argued Thursday that the Atlantic Coast Conference has left the college's athletic department with a vast budget "hole" by improperly withholding millions of dollars in shared conference revenues after the school decided to join the Big Ten. "They're taking it out of our pocket, and we don't have it," Maryland Assistant Attorney General John Kuchno said during a nearly three-hour hearing in...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
When Anne Arundel County Sheriff Ron Bateman first suggested withholding state tax refunds from people who have open warrants nearly three years ago, critics said it was a foolish pursuit. "One of the criticisms I got was, 'How many criminals have jobs where they are going to get a tax refund?'" he recalled. He couldn't say. Now he can. "There were 396," he told the County Council during a recent budget hearing. This past tax season - the first with the program fully in effect - that's the number of letters the state comptroller's office sent, telling people if they wanted their money, they'd have to clear their open Anne Arundel County warrants.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
President Bush might have thought he was doing taxpayers a favor by reducing the amount of taxes withheld from paychecks, but a lot of Baltimore-area workers apparently wish he hadn't gone to the trouble.Big employers say workers are streaming into payroll offices to submit new W-4 forms to counteract the new federal withholding requirements that went into effect March 1.The new withholding rates, which were implemented by executive order, were seen as a way to pump as much as $2 billion a month into the flagging economy.
NEWS
By Bloomberg News Service | November 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Some congressional Republicans may push to end one of the most despised items in the United States -- the withholding tax.They propose to replace it with something Americans may hate even more: a monthly tax payment to the government.The Republicans' rage to enrage has a purpose. If every American had to write a monthly check to pay taxes, he or she "would curse the government every month," said Andrew Laperriere, legislative assistant to Rep. Dick Armey of Texas, the likely House majority leader in the Congress that will convene in January.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Baltimore officials are refusing to pay the city's former speed and red-light camera operator $2 million for its final three months of work, a period that preceded the troubled start for the new contractor in January. The city stopped issuing tickets from the cameras for weeks because of the rocky transition from the old vendor, Xerox State and Local Solutions, to Brekford Corp. Xerox says it's owed money for services provided in October, November and December, according to Solicitor George Nilson, the city's chief lawyer.
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