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NEWS
November 28, 2004
On November 21, 2004, GEORGETHOMAS WITHERS; loving friend of Carrie L. Thompson. On Wednesday, the family will receive friends from 12:30 to 1 P.M. at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road, with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 655-0015.
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NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | June 14, 2011
Were he not a politician with White House ambitions, I might actually feel sorry for Mitt Romney. In an era sadly defined by the likes of Bernie Madoff and Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mr. Romney stands apart as an exemplary businessman, family man and public official. And by standing apart, I mean precisely the opposite: The former Massachusetts governor blends almost unnoticeably into the background. Mr. Romney doesn't attract major headlines because the carnivorous beast known as the 24-hour news cycle feeds not on the lean scraps of policy or intellectual debate, but the red meat of scandal.
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NEWS
March 31, 2005
Quietly, on Easter Sunday evening, March 27, 2005, MILDRED MORRIS SYDNOR, 97, beloved wife of the late Giles Sydnor, former Superintendent of the Sheet & Tin Division of the Bethlehem Steel Company at Sparrows Point, mother of two children: Giles C. Sydnor and Mildred Sydnor Walger, who died before her, and two children who survive her, Rochette Sydnor Withers and James Morris Sydnor, a daughter-in-law Margaret Hartley Sydnor, and a son-in-law Harry Melvin...
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
The fallout from the recession is apparent in empty storefronts at shopping centers and strip malls throughout the region as retailers shut their doors to cut costs amid a steep slowdown in consumer spending. The closings could have a wide impact on the local economy, hurting developers and retail brokers and leaving consumers with fewer shopping choices. Struggling shopping centers and malls, such as Owings Mills Mall, could face further hardships. Vacancies could hurt other businesses in retail centers that rely on a variety of shopping choices to attract customers.
NEWS
By Jim Remsen and Jim Remsen,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 28, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - In a curious moment for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua recently elevated a free-lance urban hermit to be its first "canonical hermit." The chosen one is a gentle soul named Richard Withers, 46. A convert to Roman Catholicism, Withers has lived alone since 1984, the last 10 years in North Philadelphia, under his own private vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. Withers had petitioned the church for the official status, citing 1983 canon-law changes that restored the ancient category of lay hermit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 25, 2007
Growing up, I remember the old folks saying, "Whatever it is, child, take it to the Lord in prayer. Prayer changes things." Elisabeth Withers heard the same as a church girl in Joliet, Ill. She knew early on that she wanted to sing, that there was nothing else she'd rather do. So for years she prayed as she formally studied her craft, eventually earning music degrees from Boston's Berklee College of Music and New York University. In just the past two years, Withers has experienced the manifestation of her prayers.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee Z | May 10, 1991
Honor Grades was the only one of the seven Preakness hopefuls stabled at Pimlico Race Course to undertake any serious work yesterday morning.The Danzig colt, trained by Carroll County native Rodney Rash, went six furlongs in 1 minute, 13 2/5 seconds with Danny Sorenson up.Rash said Chris McCarron will ride the colt in the May 18 Preakness.Honor Grades, owned by the Summa Stable of Bruce McNall and partners, finished second in the Derby Trial in his most recent start.Rash, 31, resigned as a longtime assistant to Charlie Whittingham several weeks ago to begin training on his own. When he saddled Honor Grades for the Derby Trial, it was his first official starter.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | July 8, 1992
Horse books were important to me as a child. When I headed off to school, I stocked up on books that would keep alive my love for my horses.One of the books that was most important to me as a child, though, wasn't about horses at all -- it was about words.In this book, a kingdom of little creatures was about to meet its doom. They could be saved only by finding two words that meant exactly the same thing.The little creatures brought many pairs of words to their king, who patiently explained the nuances that distinguished them.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 15, 1991
IT HAS BEEN almost 30 years since a young pianist rode the Liszt E flat concerto to national fame, his long fingers flashing over the keys, body hunched or upright, foot stomping the pedal and his 16 years pouring out the exuberance of youth.On national television three weeks later as a substitute with the New York Philharmonic under Leonard Bernstein, Andre Watts was an overnight sensation in 1963, off on an international career that begged some skepticism: Would he fade away like so many others?
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In his first inaugural address President Clinton packed into his 40-word peroration a congestion of cliches. There was ''a call,'' issued from a ''mountaintop,'' to ''service in the valley.'' There were ''trumpets,'' too, and an assurance that ''we have changed the guard.''Still, style isn't everything and if such an address is supposed to set the tone of the president's term, the address was a success.At the beginning of the address: ''Each generation of Americans must define what it means to be an American.
FEATURES
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy-Tribune | April 5, 2008
The Ruins is, with one major caveat, about as good an adaptation of Scott Smith's best-selling novel as Hollywood was ever going to make. Smith's book - about a group of college kids who stumble onto a hill in the Mexican jungle where a flesh-eating vine dwells - was the kind of relentless beach read that seemed tailor-made for the movies, at least until you realized you were dealing with a story about a talking plant that drinks blood. That would be fine if you were making Little Shop of Horrors.
NEWS
November 27, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- An old tree is dying and in danger of falling. THE BACKSTORY -- James Brooks said the tree in front of his house in the 2500 block of Riggs Ave. is about a half-century old, has split and appears to be pulling away from its roots. He said he and family members have contacted the city several times. "We are fearful that it may fall on the cars that are parked on the street," they said in an e-mail to Watchdog. Brooks lives in Rosemont, next to Calverton Middle School. "Not only is it hazardous for the community, it presents a very dreadful appearance," the e-mail said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | September 23, 2007
A week after Gov. Martin O'Malley came to Harford County and promised residents they would not have to endure increased traffic without new roads and improvements to existing highways, state transportation officials brought sobering news on transportation projects during an annual visit to Bel Air. John D. Porcari, state transportation secretary, said the state budget crisis is impeding new projects and a 10-year-old backlog of unfunded road improvements statewide...
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Sailing is supposed to be fun. Linking you with a simpler past, the wind becomes your best friend, making a large sailboat move, at times, as swiftly as the gulls that nest nearby. Yesterday, as the warm wind bore down like a high-octane heater on students at the Annapolis Sailing School and the sun's rays reflected off the water, the heat index of 107 felt, unbelievably enough, hotter, and the age-old pastime was a little less fun. Withering is more like it. But it could have been worse.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Frank D. Roylance and Andrew A. Green and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporters | July 27, 2007
LA PLATA -- As Maryland's drought continues to deepen, Gov. Martin O'Malley acted yesterday to seek federal assistance for farmers facing severe crop losses. The governor officially requested that the federal Department of Agriculture declare a disaster area in Maryland counties hurt by the drought, which has been particularly severe in Southern Maryland and the Lower Eastern Shore. "This disaster designation, if the federal government comes through with it ... will make low-interest loans available to provide relief to our farmers so they don't lose their farms due to the loss of their crops," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2007
Earl F. "Buddy" Hance, a fifth-generation Calvert County farmer, says he hasn't seen a drought like this in almost a quarter-century. "My corn crop, I figure I've lost 80 to 90 percent," he said yesterday. "And soy, I have very limited potential for making a crop. We haven't had significant rainfall where I live for two months." Hance, who is also Maryland's deputy secretary of agriculture, says the grim news is echoing across Maryland. Scant rainfall during the prime growing season has damaged as much as 60 percent of the corn crop and 50 percent of the soybeans, hay and pasture grass in Southern Maryland and the lower Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By Mary Carroll and Mary Carroll,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | August 2, 2000
To my mind, the best part of this time of year is garden-ripe tomatoes. Even when the rest of the garden has succumbed to the heat, the ruby globes still expand beneath their canopy of furry leaves. Just brushing up against the waist-high tomato bushes releases the pungent scent of salads into the hot air. Come winter, I know I'm going to wish for this scent, this heady flavor. But I'll have packed memories of it into jars of sun-dried tomatoes. I first sun-dried fresh tomato slices on my back porch in Palo Alto, Calif.
NEWS
May 13, 1995
Savings bonds have been a part of the American tradition for more than 50 years. A popular birthday gift, a payroll-deduction habit, a prudent nest egg for the future.Beginning in 1941 as war bonds, and then as part of the national effort to build U.S. strength during the Cold War, saving bonds came to be accepted as a safe and productive way for the average person to invest. "Help yourself by helping Uncle Sam" was a longtime slogan.But this month, Uncle Sam decided not to be so grateful.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 1, 2007
Let us speak of the sorrows of fame. You are a hot young thing on a promotional tour for your book or movie or perfume and the limo brings you to the small luxury hotel and the celebrity suite where you step into the bathroom and notice a wad of snot protruding from your left nostril. How long has this been hanging there? You've spent all day mingling with people ecstatic at the sight of you you you, and yet not one of them dared mention this mucus ballooning from your nasal cavity. Nor did your publicist Stephanie, nor the reporters at the press opportunity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 25, 2007
Growing up, I remember the old folks saying, "Whatever it is, child, take it to the Lord in prayer. Prayer changes things." Elisabeth Withers heard the same as a church girl in Joliet, Ill. She knew early on that she wanted to sing, that there was nothing else she'd rather do. So for years she prayed as she formally studied her craft, eventually earning music degrees from Boston's Berklee College of Music and New York University. In just the past two years, Withers has experienced the manifestation of her prayers.
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